Are too many certifications a bad thing? - page 12

As a new RN grad I've been working hard at attaining all kinds of certifications and course completions. ACLS, PALS, ATLS, Rapid STEMI identification, Stroke assessment, with NRP, TNCC, and CCRN... Read More

  1. by   RNOTODAY
    Quote from Ruger8mm
    Do my posts really stink of arrogance?
    They literally REEK of it... truly
  2. by   Ruger8mm
    So years later I'm finding a lot of the advice provided to me on this thread years ago is misguided if not even wrong. However it occurs to me many who responded are most likely large metro RNs who work on a specialized unit or have a are isolated to one type of patient. Here in Northern MN at critical access hospitals we RNs are pretty much a do-all RN and are expected to have the knowledge/background. Just tonight I assisted in a delivery (had to bone up on NRP prior to) then cared some SOB patients in the ED before working with a tweaked out druggie who had significant mental health issues. And let's not forget the trauma that came in. So with that said, don't assume a broad knowledge base vs a focused base is the way to go.
  3. by   pixierose
    Quote from Ruger8mm
    So years later I'm finding a lot of the advice provided to me on this thread years ago is misguided if not even wrong. However it occurs to me many who responded are most likely large metro RNs who work on a specialized unit or have a are isolated to one type of patient. Here in Northern MN at critical access hospitals we RNs are pretty much a do-all RN and are expected to have the knowledge/background. Just tonight I assisted in a delivery (had to bone up on NRP prior to) then cared some SOB patients in the ED before working with a tweaked out druggie who had significant mental health issues. And let's not forget the trauma that came in. So with that said, don't assume a broad knowledge base vs a focused base is the way to go.
    I didn't take part in the original thread but did read through it in its entirety ... So, a fresh pair of eyes if you will.

    Advice based on the information you provided at the time was not misinformed, nor was it "wrong."

    Now, as someone whose seen a lot in small town ED's ... RNs might need to be a jack of all trades, sure. But a master of none. For example, with the delivery, even with your NRP skills, I'd prefer you to immediately hand the kid over to someone more qualified (I find that to be competent in NRP, having regular exposure to healthy neonates is critical as they are their own little breed of their own with their own set of VS, etc).

    I guess what I'm saying is, you're still coming across in your posts as arrogant and as someone who may react carelessly as such. Whether you're like that in real life, who knows. The mere mention alone of "a lot of advice ... is misguided if not even wrong" ... well, that was based on info YOU alone provided. What, exactly, was wrong? You weren't in a specialty at the time of your OP, no? While education is a great thing, it's better at first to thrive in your area and branch out from there. If it's the adult ED, that's different from a PEDS ED. Why get PALS if your hired at the adult hospital and the children's hospital is across town? In your OP, you weren't in Northem MI. You weren't even hired in a specialty.

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