Dozens of nurses at Northern California hospital balk at wearing locators - page 4

About two dozen nurses at Eden Medical Center near San Jose, Calif., have turned in the personal locator devices the hospital had required them to wear. The hospital contends the devices help provide... Read More

  1. by   cindyln
    We have those locators at the hospital I work at.They are good for one thing,finding a coworker when they have a phone call or visitor.Most of us just leave them in our lockers.
  2. by   RNCCHERYL
    Originally posted by Glad2behere
    Exactly correct Erdiane,

    Then it will tell over a period of time just how long it takes to:

    Change dressings

    Set up IVs

    Pass other meds

    Chart

    Take medical histories

    Every specific function a nurse can do will have an allotment time.

    Patients will now be grouped into task/time criteria and the number of nurses required.

    Final product...allnurses have to perform at the level of the super
    nurses. No allowances for age, experience, and or things that go wrong.

    It would have been a lot cheaper if they just make everyone wear NEON SWAZTIKAS, magnetically coded and strategically placed as well.

    I sure the devil am not going to wear one of those, and nursing ain't so cool that I would wear a dog collar either...don't believe I need either of them that badly.

    Imagine, administration maybe cutting their noses off to spite their face. They will see how much we do and how hard we work. They will also see bathroom breaks are not one of our options on really bad days.....
    :roll
  3. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas


    Location devices ehh, sounds neat will they help me find myself when I get lost. I sometimes do get lost, particularly now that Im getting older.
    If things get hairy can I tap on it and say, " Beam me up, Scottie" those things just might be helpfull.
    Then also the person I feel sorry for, is the person the hire to correlate, and categorize, and assess all that data they obtain from their little locator/ tracker device.
    My hospital has been talking about getting cellphones, for communication. I refuse to have one of those brain tumor causing devices.


    doo wah ditty
  4. by   l.rae
    Originally posted by teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas


    Location devices ehh, sounds neat will they help me find myself when I get lost. I sometimes do get lost, particularly now that Im getting older.
    If things get hairy can I tap on it and say, " Beam me up, Scottie" those things just might be helpfull.
    Then also the person I feel sorry for, is the person the hire to correlate, and categorize, and assess all that data they obtain from their little locator/ tracker device.
    My hospital has been talking about getting cellphones, for communication. I refuse to have one of those brain tumor causing devices.


    doo wah ditty
    ....Hey Tom...try putting those locaters on your golf balls!..LOL:roll ....LR
  5. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    Heya I.rae with a 5 handicap, I generally dont need to.




    doo wah ditty
  6. by   rebelwaclause
    Originally posted by shavsha
    If I need my charge nurse for anything I just punch a dial and I know the where I can find her for help. That saves me a lot of time asking around "Have you seen ___________". They also have a sensor that automatically turns off the call bell when I enter the room. We too have the ability to audibly page someone in another room but out of courtesy we hardly ever do it. (I may have been paged maybe once in the last year). I don't know if our management is "tracking"...it wouldn't surprise me. But it has never been brought up in any way. And to my great relief there are no sensors in the bathrooms!
    EXACTLY! And management tracking people? , they don't have the savvy to download all the information and put it in a file!

    I'm thinking here. Is there a fear that nurses can no longer hide, disappear and offer mediocre nursing because the device could "catch you?". Hmmmmm.
    Last edit by rebelwaclause on Sep 19, '02
  7. by   RNCCHERYL
    A cell phone for the charge nurse works just as well. I wear a phone all the time and it works just great.....I wouldn't want to wear a tracking device! I think it is punch in the face to the nursing profession.
  8. by   KC CHICK
    We have cell phones and portable tele monitors. If we need to be reached, then we can be reached. No one needs to know my bathroom patterns or my private conversations when I'm on my break. If I care to vent to a co-worker on my own time (i.e. breaks), then I'm entitiled to do so without possible punishment/backlash from Admin that "overhears" such conversation.

    Anne

    PS: I noticed that NMAs profile indicates that he's both a writer and an 'RN Student'. Are you still a student at this time, or have you walked in the shoes of those that you're giving advice to?? Having said that....I have a question. Do writers have to wear a tracking device to track productivity??? How about listening in on your private conversations with co-workers, etc.? How many times per day do you pee? Care to share THAT with your boss?
    "Stop. Study. Analyze. Respond." (NMA)
    Last edit by KC CHICK on Sep 19, '02
  9. by   NMAguiar
    Last edit by NMAguiar on Sep 20, '02
  10. by   l.rae
    Originally posted by teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from deep in the heat of texas

    Heya I.rae with a 5 handicap, I generally dont need to.




    doo wah ditty
    OK!!OK!!...YOU WIN!
  11. by   NMAguiar
    Last edit by NMAguiar on Sep 20, '02
  12. by   KC CHICK
    I feel that the arguement here is a valid one...although somewhat skewed from the original statement that started this thread.
    I am a nurse. I am not a newspaper writer. I couldn't begin to understand issues a newspaper writer must face. Therefore, I am not qualified to give advice to a newspaper writer in regards to issues they encounter on the job. I am certainly NOT qualified to judge a newspaper writer "paranoid" because of a response he/she has to a change, potential or real, implemented on the job.

    'Nuff said,
    Anne

    PS: I don't think the rest of us went to RN school to "blow a couple of years".
    Last edit by KC CHICK on Sep 20, '02
  13. by   jani
    Have tracking system at my hospital. Hated idea at first, but is very convenient. Can locate staff and help quickly, don't spend time trying to locate CNA. Can call for emergency aid with the push of a button. Tracking system not wired for BR!!!

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