"Shift goes to the lowest bidder..." - page 2

This is NOT an advertisement; it is a copy of an article. Maybe it's just me, but I find it disgusting: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Online... Read More

  1. by   liberalrn
    Y'all don't see this as unprofessional? I am not a day laborer--hired out because I undercut my colleague. If someone is desperate enough and needs the $$--they will work for under the "base" and where does that leave the rest of the pool? With a new lower starting point in salsry negotiation.
    Let's do slippery slope--what is to stop the hospital from firing their staff and just using this system? No bennys to worry about, just workman's comp. No vacations to schedule, no short term dis. etc. And also, no "coporate ambience" or culture (every hospital's got one, for good or ill). Work is more than $$$--it's the people and the atmosphere, the trust built up between co-workers and decent administrators. I feel this approach is a band aid on a hemmorrhage that will ultimately hurt nursing, big time.
  2. by   Going80INA55
    I too, think it is not a bad idea. It may give people the option of picking up some extra shifts and hopefully cut down on us being called at home and BEGGED to come in.
  3. by   sjoe
    How about adding the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System CEO position to that web site and offering the job to the lowest bidder?
    Last edit by sjoe on Apr 19, '03
  4. by   kitty=^..^=cat
    Actually, "salary requirements" disclosed by CEO and other executive position candidates are considered during the hiring process, so really the same thing does happen.
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by liberalrn
    Y'all don't see this as unprofessional? I am not a day laborer--hired out because I undercut my colleague. If someone is desperate enough and needs the $$--they will work for under the "base" and where does that leave the rest of the pool? With a new lower starting point in salsry negotiation. I feel this approach is a band aid on a hemmorrhage that will ultimately hurt nursing, big time.
    I don't agree with any practice that results in lower wage...we are still fighting to have a wage on par with our responsibilities, IMO. Trouble is there will be nurses who need to work and WILL undercut. I agree this will hurt us all in the long run.

    But I have a union mentality....and feel we should think of the welfare of nurses in general . Going down is never a good idea when it comes to wages...it ultimately reduces our power and worth. :stone
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Originally posted by mattsmom81
    I don't agree with any practice that results in lower wage...we are still fighting to have a wage on par with our responsibilities, IMO. Trouble is there will be nurses who need to work and WILL undercut. I agree this will hurt us all in the long run.

    But I have a union mentality....and feel we should think of the welfare of nurses in general . Going down is never a good idea when it comes to wages...it ultimately reduces our power and worth. :stone

    Agree.

    And, I know I don't want a nurse who may be there just because she's in desperate financial straits caring for me!
  7. by   liberalrn
    I think this is the scariest thing to come along in a long time in nursing. But it isn't coming from nurses--it's coming from hospitals. It pits nurses against one another and the winner is the hospital's bottom line. I fell it's unethical and unconscionable. Agency is traditionally more expensive then staff--we are given too many opportunities to work OT w/o agency, so don't understand the previous poster re: can't get OT slots d/t agency. There are plenty of people who will have to work this bidding system and end up shorting themselves. This is not a way for professionals to make money, imho. This is not against IC's--they have a contract for shifts extending over a period of time (if I understand their system correctly)--this is per diem work AKA day laboring.......no thank you.
  8. by   JNJ
    Just to offer a little comparison - airline steward 'bid' for their shifts a month in advance - not in $ terms, but in terms of what routes and class of passenger they prefer to work.

    If the hospital starts the bidding at about what an agency nurse gets paid (but not what the agency gets paid) I don't see the problem. One smart HR person, I believe, and goodness knows we could do with a few of those people thinking outside the box.

    As with most things, the market (and the nurses) will decide if this system works or not.
  9. by   liberalrn
    LOt of ifs there. I am leery of any system that pits nurse against nurse. This does not benefit the nurses. I wonder if it's even in liine with labor laws. Time and 1/2 after 40 hs worked, right? Not w/ this system--lowest bidder wins. Period. Banking on a communal minimum is naive. I feel this is unprofessional.
  10. by   jadednurse
    I suppose it's not the idea that bothers me so much as the mentality. What next, they'll carry this over into the actual delivery of care. Imagine starting off your shift sitting in the report room with the charge nurse bellowing "and now we have Bed 4, the isolation patient with multiple draining stage 4 decubiti, an exploding colostomy bag and a very needy entourage of visitng family members...last one inthe door gets this patient assignment!"
  11. by   liberalrn
    oh, LOL!!! People would be showing up early! Think this whole system is demeaning--and fear that it is the way of the future--no bennys, precious little job security, but we can bid our talent and skill away online! Awful!
  12. by   sjoe
    Kitty writes: "Actually, "salary requirements" disclosed by CEO and other executive position candidates are considered during the hiring process, so really the same thing does happen."

    If it is the same thing, then I presume the present CEO was the lowest bidder?
  13. by   babs_rn
    You're sh***ing me, right?

    HO-ly COW!

Must Read Topics


close