License Reinstatement After Revoke Is There Hope?

  1. 0 Hello, my name is Robi and I am new to this site and I'm not even sure if I deserve to be here, but I have a question that I hope someone can help me with. I was a licensed Practical Nurse in the state of Tennessee until 2004 when my license was revoked to due a prescription drug addiction. Due to the shame I felt and still feel to this day, I never tried fighting for my license at the time, but long to be able to practise again and have been sober for 5 years and working in an office outside of the medical field. I just don't know where to begin. I have researched the tennesse state board of health for answers, but it seems so complicated, I just don't know what step to take first and after all this time, I don't even know if I have a chance at getting my license reinstated. I guess what I'm trying to ask is there even a chance for me? I am willing to do whatever it takes no matter how expensive, time consuming, or shameful it may make me feel in order to get my license back, but I just wonder if I would even be considered and if so, would I be required to go back to school to refresh my skills and would it help for me to try to become certified as a nurse assistant in the meantime in order to at least have myself back in the field and even if that would be allowed. I'm sorry to make this so long and would welcome any advice or suggestions on this matter.

    Thank you so much,

    Robi
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  3. Visit  robigayle} profile page

    About robigayle

    From 'tennessee'; 52 Years Old; Joined Jan '09; Posts: 19; Likes: 19.

    72 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  deyo321} profile page
    4
    One suggestion...call your Board of Nursing and be totally honest. They will respect that. Then follow through on what they expect of you.
  5. Visit  robigayle} profile page
    0
    Thank you. You are absolutely right about that. I think talking to someone personally whether it's positive or negative news would be better than just floundering like I am right now.

    Thank you again

    Robi
  6. Visit  Batman24} profile page
    0
    I agree with the above...you need to call the BON and then do as they advise. I think there is a good chance you will be reinstated if you provide them the info they need and you are willing to check in, etc. as required.
  7. Visit  Jules A} profile page
    0
    Hi Robi,
    I know our BON tries whatever they can not to take a nurses license and they are pretty realistic with the fact that there will be nurses who have trouble with addiction. I'd agree to call them. I wish you all the best. Please keep us posted. Jules
  8. Visit  DebanamRN} profile page
    0
    Please call your BON. In NJ, the BON has a whole area devoted to helping nurses with addiction issues. It could be that your BON has the same.

    Good luck,

    Deb
  9. Visit  1stloveistobeanurse} profile page
    0
    I have a friend who is a LPN she is not going through the same thing as you, however, she has told me several times she has worked with nurses in your same situation. I say that to say this, Dont be so hard on yourself that you give up trying. Often times we will go through something in life and we feel as if we are all alone. This is not the case, when we feel like this we don't see a way out. You should contact your BON, but before you do that be honest with yourself, you had a problem and you did what you had to do to correct it, and 5 years is a great accomplishment Start there, if you have not join a support group and when you approach your BON show them your accomplishment not just your mistakes.

    You will be just fine, believe me, we are all praying for you and will see you when you enter the field of nursing once again.

    God Bless
  10. Visit  L&Dnurse2Be} profile page
    1
    First of all let me say how wonderful it is that you have been sober for 5 years! Good job! As far as your license...I agree with all the other posters, call your BON and be honest. Good luck!
    Jules A likes this.
  11. Visit  robigayle} profile page
    6
    Oh my goodness! I never expected such an overwhelming sweet and quick response. I think I've been filled with so much shame and quilt that I didn't feel like I deserved sympathy or compassion for what I did and you all just reminded me of why I wanted to be a nurse for so long and why I want to be one once again. So much love and compassion in the nursing community! Thank you so much. I can't describe the joy your words have filled me with and also a renewed sense that maybe I can do this after all. I have let fear and shame lead the way for so long that I'd forgotten that there can be forgiveness and redemption as well for me too. Thank you and bless you all and I will keep you informed of my progress.

    Robi
    Gold_SJ, KimberlyRN89, leslie :-D, and 3 others like this.
  12. Visit  Batman24} profile page
    1
    I'm sop glad we could all help. You should be proud of yourself that you have been clean for 5 years. I wish you tons of luck and really hope you will keep us posted on how things
    go. Hugs.
    leslie :-D likes this.
  13. Visit  nana23} profile page
    0
    I am a psych and rehab nurse, and you definitly need to contact the nursing board! We frequently have nurses in our hospital detoxing from various addictions. I worked with a nurse when I first started nursing, at a VERY famous hospital in MD, and she was caught with patients medications!! She was allowed to resign, and given a job in more of a long term facility only in managment, no direct patient care while she worked a program, all of this thru the board of Nursing in that state. Please don't give up, you have been clean for so long, and you have an insight that could really help alot of people.
  14. Visit  NRSKarenRN} profile page
    1
    TN: http://health.state.tn.us/boards/Nursing/complaints.htm (second tab is Peer Assistance)

    The Tennessee Professional Assistance Program is a voluntary program funded by nurses' licensure fees through the Tennessee Board of Nursing. The program offers consultation, referral, and monitoring for nurses whose practice is impaired, or potentially impaired, due to the use of drugs or alcohol, or psychological or physiological condition.
    A referral can be made confidentially by the employer, EAP, co-worker, family member, friend, or the nurse her/himself. If the nurse is willing to undergo a thorough evaluation to determine the extent of the problem and any treatment needed, all information is kept confidential from the Board of Nursing, and the nurse does not face disciplinary action against his/her nursing license.
    According to the Nurse Practice Act, any nurse who knows of any health care provider's incompetent, unethical or illegal practice MUST report that information through proper channels. The only two (2) proper channels to report nurses are:

    • The Board of Nursing, via Health Related Boards Investigations, or
    • The Tennessee Nurses Professional Assistance Program.

    Addiction is a significant problem among all health care professionals, in all areas of the country. It is a chronic, progressive illness that can be treated effectively. As with all chronic illnesses, the earlier the identification and treatment, the better the prognosis.
    Some signs of addiction in nurses are listed below:

    • Mood swings; inappropriate behavior at work; frequent days off for implausible reasons; non-compliance with acceptable policies and procedures; deteriorating appearance; deteriorating job performance; sloppy, illegible charting; errors in charting; alcohol on the breath; forgetfulness; poor judgment and concentration; lying; and volunteering to be the med nurse.
    • Other characteristics of addiction nurses include high achievement, both as a student and a nurse, volunteering for overtime and extra duties, no drug use until prescribed following surgery or a chronic illness, and family history of alcoholism or addiction.

    Of course, any of these characteristics may be symptoms of a number of other problems besides addiction.
    If you have questions or concerns, contact the Tennessee Professional Assistance Program. The staff is centrally located in Nashville, but will assist with a nurse in any part of the state. The Professional Assistance Program can also be utilized to provide educational presentations regarding addiction for institutions, professional organizations, and schools of nursing. Contact the office for more information or to schedule a presentation.
    Tennessee Professional Assistance Program
    545 Mainstream Drive, Suite 414
    Nashville, TN 37228-1201
    Phone: 615-726-4001 or
    Toll Free: 1-888-776-0786
    Fax: 615-467-6616
    Email:
    www.tnpap.org
    Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday
    robigayle likes this.
  15. Visit  rngolfer53} profile page
    1
    Quote from robigayle
    Hello, my name is Robi and I am new to this site and I'm not even sure if I deserve to be here, but I have a question that I hope someone can help me with. I was a licensed Practical Nurse in the state of Tennessee until 2004 when my license was revoked to due a prescription drug addiction. Due to the shame I felt and still feel to this day, I never tried fighting for my license at the time, but long to be able to practise again and have been sober for 5 years and working in an office outside of the medical field. I just don't know where to begin. I have researched the tennesse state board of health for answers, but it seems so complicated, I just don't know what step to take first and after all this time, I don't even know if I have a chance at getting my license reinstated. I guess what I'm trying to ask is there even a chance for me? I am willing to do whatever it takes no matter how expensive, time consuming, or shameful it may make me feel in order to get my license back, but I just wonder if I would even be considered and if so, would I be required to go back to school to refresh my skills and would it help for me to try to become certified as a nurse assistant in the meantime in order to at least have myself back in the field and even if that would be allowed. I'm sorry to make this so long and would welcome any advice or suggestions on this matter.

    Thank you so much,

    Robi
    Congratulations on 5 years of being clean and sober!!! To me, that shows you have what it takes to turn your desire to get your license back into reality.

    Like others have said, start with the BON. Check out their publications or web site to see if there in any material related to your situation. If so, you can likely come up with a checklist of things to do. If you completed any formal treatment programs for your substance abuse, have the records available. Get some strong references.

    It would probably not hurt to hire an attorney who practices regularly before the BON. Not that you want to turn this into an adversarial journey, but to guide you as far as what the law says, what the BON has done in the past, why some people succeeded and others didn't. If you do run into roadblocks, your attorney will already be familiar with your case, and can request formal hearings, etc, prn.

    Good luck to you.
    robigayle likes this.


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