NP's are okay to see if you have a cold, BUT... - page 2

I want to become a nurse practitioner. At least, I'm pretty sure I do. I can't say with 100% certainty but it is definitely something I am interested in. I think I would like having my own clinic... Read More

  1. by   CHATSDALE
    when my ex was in the military we had to go to af base for tx...they relied heavily on pa/np the tx would vary according to the attitude/capability of the individual
    op might benefit from working in an established clinic before opening own clinic exposing one to various degrees of interest and hands on experience is the best teacher
  2. by   gauge14iv
    Chicken pox don't always present as a text book case either.
  3. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    That seems unbelievable. Did that doctor get his medical degree out of a cereal box?
    Any doctor who is not able to recognize chicken pox should be reported to the medical board.
    He was and is an excellent MD. He was recently out of his internal medicine residency at that time. The NP just had more experience and knowledge. That happens. I had varicella pneumonia too.
  4. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    I assume, even though an NP can be a PCP, that an NP mostly treats colds, minor infections, gives physicals to truckers...but a NP certainly is not a doctor (even though the name on prescription bottles usually reads "Dr. so and so".)

    Another CNS checking in here.....

    I agree with the others who suggested you shadow an NP, you are in for a surprise about the scope of practice for an NP. If that is all you are expecting to learn how to do in school, then you are going to be overwhelmed so its important you get a better picture of what NPs actually do. It's good that you are asking.

    As for the PA's presumed misdiagnosis, surely you must know that even good physicians do not always make the correct diagnosis the first time, if at all?


    P.S. Also wanted to add, that you might want to check around and see if you can find an NP working in a nontraditional setting, i.e. clinic or doctor's office. There are many, many opportunities for NPs especially in an urban setting.
    Last edit by SharonH, RN on Oct 6, '06
  5. by   MS, APRN, BC, FNP
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Your experience with the PA and your childs neck lump wasnt a PA vs MD issue but a 1 provider vs another issue.

    One MD might have said the same thing the PA did. And another PA or NP might have said the same thing the MD did - depends on the person, their background, experience and exposure. Not the credentials. Give me a tenth year NP over a first year MD any day.
    You hit the nail on the head. It seems the OP has a very high opinion of MDs just because they have MD after their name. I would like to stress to the OP that having MD after your name means absolutely nothing. I place emphasis on the competence of the individual when I seek a consultation whether it be an MD or NP. There are some MDs that I would never consult with. It's obvious the OP hasn't been around many MDs.

    As far as the scope of what an FNP sees, I see everything that a MD sees and consult/refer when appropriate just as an MD should.

    ........and yes, give me a competent 10 or 5 year NP any day over a 1st or 2nd year MD.
    Last edit by MS, APRN, BC, FNP on Oct 7, '06
  6. by   marilynmom
    Wow, you have never had a MD/DO misdiagnos you? I sure have. I went to the ER a couple years ago when I work up one morning and the room was spinning. The MD at the ER said I was just dehydrated and gave me an IV and sent me home. The next day I was correctly diagnosed with benign positional vertigo by another MD in a different hospital. BIG difference in diagnoses.

    People make mistakes, they miss things at times. It happens. It is individual and it doesn't make them a bad practitioner, only human. I don't think any Dr alive has been correct 100% of the time.
  7. by   ERNP
    Quote from gauge14iv
    Chicken pox don't always present as a text book case either.
    I'll say... would you have a knee jerk suspicion of measles in a 50 year old woman?? I sent her home telling her I was having a hard time getting my head around it, but that was the thing it looked most like. Confirmed by lab.
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    Ok, I may be getting a bit off topic here. Why should a patient see any healthcare provider for a cold? This is the second time I've read on the forum in different places...'NPs are ok to see for a cold'. I don't understand why students or nurses would aspire to a profession which, it appears, they don't really hold in high esteem. Is it an unconscious lack of respect for a female-dominated profession by females themselves?
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Nov 19, '06
  9. by   prmenrs
    I used an NP as my PCP for ~ 5 years. She was absolutely awesome! I would have no problem w/having one again.

    When I worked in a Level 3 nursery, we would eventually shift any chronic to the NNPs because hte residents changed every month. So, the NNPs could give them more continuity of care. Often the NNPs were in charge of doc "work" rounds in the convalescing area of the nursery instead of one of the attendings.
  10. by   ERNP
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Ok, I may be getting a bit off topic here. Why should a patient see any healthcare provider for a cold? This is the second time I've read on the forum in different places...'NPs are ok to see for a cold'. I don't understand why nurses or students would aspire to a profession which, it appears, they don't really hold in high esteem. Is it the lack of respect for a female-dominated profession? Probably so?

    Oh come on... I know you know the drill. They see NPs and all kinds of healthcare providers for colds looking an instant fix for the ailment. They are never happy to find out there is "no magic bullet". There are days when I feel like using a magic bullet, but that wouldn't help the patient and I would be arrested, so I can only mention the lack of a magic bullet during my time with these persons.

    It doesn't seems to me that aspiring to be the best has been ingrained into many of the programs of higher learning. I remember when I was in undergrad we had an assessment competition with med students. We won hands down with flying colors. Having had that experience I really don't feel like they are getting any more out of an encounter than I am getting.

    Maybe if the schools teaching advanced practice nursing weren't so interested in everyone knowing where the walls of the box are and the inherent danger of passing beyond the scope of the walls, but were more interested in looking at what an NP has to offer outside the box, the attitudes of many would change.

    NPs have just gotten started exploring outside the box, I would encourage all to find at least one thing that is outside the box someone else wants you to be in, and incorporate into your day. Just one idea a week adds fifty new avenues per year per NP. THAT is a lot of new ways of thinking about NP practice.
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    ERNP, I was referring to NURSES saying 'NP's are ok to see for a cold'. I wasn't thinking about the general public.

    Good ideas about expanding thinking and perceptions.

    FYI I'm just a student. I plan on going on to grad school. I just pipe up in this forum occasionally because you all are so gracious w/me!
  12. by   ERNP
    I was talking about nurses and nursing faculty too. I won't move on to the general populace until we can come up with a semblance of a collective thought.

    Besides, my interactions with the public would leave me to think many of them have a higher opinion of NPs than the OP
  13. by   gauge14iv
    one thing I do NOT like about the ad campaigns for the minute clinics and redi clinics - is that they give the public the idea that the only things an NP is qualified to diagnose and treat is sore throats and sunburn. I dont think the retail clinics are doing NP's any favors at all in that regard.

    Drives me nuts.

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