Do FNP's really make 80k to 90k a year? - page 7

by mariposabella | 83,172 Views | 95 Comments

Hi everyone, I was talking to my aunt who is an FNP, but she mostly teaches and does research. She was telling me that FNP's make 80k-90k a year and that FNP's are going to be really in demand when health care reform kicks... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from juan de la cruz
    Yes, worked for HFHS in Detroit and moonlighted at HFHS in WB (I'm sure you know what the letters mean). You can easily find that goal salary in Michigan. Don't know what your interests are but when I left Michigan in late 2009, HFHS was still hiring NP's for in-patient positions with 3 twelve hour shifts a week and are paying well over 80K for NP's even those without NP experience which was upsetting to some experienced NP's who started at 70K just a few years ago but that's just how things go. Some of my colleagues worked for hospitals owned by DMC, OHS (Downriver), WBH, and SJMHS and are getting around the same pay scale. UMich pays really good and their salary ranges are in the public domain but it seems harder to get a job there. I feel there are a lot of in-patient positions in SE Michigan more so than clinic positions but that's almost 2 years ago now so I don't know what the current job outlook is.
    Thanks so much for the information. You confirmed some things that I suspected but didn't really know for sure.
  2. 2
    Going back to the question on FNP vs PNP/ NNP. I know several people from grad school who were in the NNP program and it was not a hard field to get into....and it generally pays very well. I'm an Acute Care PNP and most of the people in my graduating class have done well because we have gone on to specialities. That seems to pay quite a bit more than working in a general medicine area such as a pediatrician's office. I'm a cardiology PNP (1 year experience) with 3 years of RN pediatric cardiac ICU experience. I took a job right out of grad school in San Antonio, Tx for $77,600 year with malpractice covered, Mon-Fri, no holidays ect. I was just offered a job that I will most likely take for $106,000 year in Dallas.

    With the cutback on resident hours I think the demand for NPs is just going to increase.
    missvictoriat and mariposabella like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from miranda1200
    Going back to the question on FNP vs PNP/ NNP. I know several people from grad school who were in the NNP program and it was not a hard field to get into....and it generally pays very well. I'm an Acute Care PNP and most of the people in my graduating class have done well because we have gone on to specialities. That seems to pay quite a bit more than working in a general medicine area such as a pediatrician's office. I'm a cardiology PNP (1 year experience) with 3 years of RN pediatric cardiac ICU experience. I took a job right out of grad school in San Antonio, Tx for $77,600 year with malpractice covered, Mon-Fri, no holidays ect. I was just offered a job that I will most likely take for $106,000 year in Dallas.

    With the cutback on resident hours I think the demand for NPs is just going to increase.
    Sorry, I'm not entirely following your acronyms. Is PNP primary nurse practitioner? And what do you mean by NNP?
    scarcity21 likes this.
  4. 2
    I work in a rural area in what is considered one of the more poor states in the country, and it definitely isn't unheard of around here. I have friends making more than that in certain specialties, and almost every job offer that I received upon graduation (I graduated in December) was at least in that range. I work in an emergency department, and I will just say that the additional education was very much worth the investment. So, I highly recommend the nurse practitioner profession and I also recommend the family specialty as opposed to pediatric or any of the other specialties because you aren't limited to any one age group, so it opens doors to working in women's health, family practice, emerergency departments, hospitalist, etc.
    Lady11 and 1981RN like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from GM2RN
    Sorry, I'm not entirely following your acronyms. Is PNP primary nurse practitioner? And what do you mean by NNP?
    PNP = Pediatric NP
    NNP = Neonatal NP
    scarcity21 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    PNP = Pediatric NP
    NNP = Neonatal NP

    Thanks. That makes more sense.
  7. 0
    What about Adult NPs ? Anyone care to share info on salary for adult NPs and specialty types ?

    Thanks in advance.
  8. 0
    Anyone know the full pay value of being a new grad FNP in the military with less than 2 years experience as a O2 (1st LT)? I know you get base pay, but with the other stuff included, what's the estimated salary? I know the very first year, the pay is lower than the civilian sector.
  9. 0
    Quote from NurseW74
    Anyone know the full pay value of being a new grad FNP in the military with less than 2 years experience as a O2 (1st LT)? I know you get base pay, but with the other stuff included, what's the estimated salary? I know the very first year, the pay is lower than the civilian sector.
    *** Here you go:http://militarypay.defense.gov/mpcal...ators/RMC.aspx
  10. 0
    Quote from linearthinker
    Yes, this is why I said "Personally." As in, speaking only for myself. Not speaking for anyone else. My words apply only to me. My words do not apply to you. Personally. My person. No one else's. Do not infer from my statements, prefaced "personally," that I am implying anything about you. Or anyone else. I am only speaking of my perspective. I refer only to my experience. I am not assuming anything about anyone else's. I guess sometimes "personally" means YOU. I didn't not mean you, I meant me, personally. Sorry for the confusion. :lol:


    TO FUNNY!!!


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