Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 8

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey... Read More

  1. Visit  nguyency77} profile page
    1
    In Vietnam and China, ALL "female" jobs require you to have a certain look. It does not matter if you came up with the theory of relativity and revolutionized the world of science; if you are considered unattractive, you will lose the position to the ditzy teenager who slept with the HR manager. If by 'their' standards, you are slim and leggy with a cute face and a girly voice, you're hired. This is true whether you are a cashier at KFC or if you're a new nurse. Never mind logic.

    There is definitely a shift from Nursing by Merit & Experience to Nursing by Customer Service. It's kind of sad that healthcare is shifting to a customer service model.
    ColoradoRocky likes this.
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  3. Visit  Ruby Vee} profile page
    13
    Quote from Jenni811
    I don't think it is about looks. We too have hired alot of young, female, smaller build nurses. The turn over rate in hospital is huge, what nurse in their right mind would actually WANT to go back to bedside nursing?? A nurse in their 40-50's has probably figured it out and has been at the bedside and wants to be done at the bedside. So they leave it up to the young ones who need to figure that out, and need to gain experience before going anywhere else.

    Oh trust me, i've heard our experiened staff joke around with things and let me tell you, it actually hurts. They all crack jokes about how it should now be a requirement that "You are under 30 years old, slim with brown hair and a bubbly personality." I fall under that category of "Slim, young, brown hair"...im not an idiot. but the question i have for them is, do you ever think to look beyond that?? How about the fact i graduated with a 3.7GPA and made the deans list 4 years running. how about the fact i worked nights as a CNA while attending nursing school? How about the fact i have worked my butt off getting certifications in things you probably never heard of. How about the fact that my computer skills are far more superior than the 50 year old they just interviewed that can hardly even type? Look BEYOND the surface of these people.
    Yes, i think hospitals are hiring young, new grads because the are cheaper. It's a smart business move. if i were running a business and had to pick between a 55 year old with a great personality, 25+ years of experience and wanting $30.00 an hour and a 24 year old with 2 years experinece with a great personality and wanting $24.00 an hour...i would choose the 24 year old. The hosptial wants great satisfaction scores. A Patient really isn't going to care how much experience their nurse has (to a certain degree). Their satisfaction scores come from a smily face, a good personality, friendly nurses, good customer service etc. I've never heard a patient give a hospital a low satisfaction score because "My nurse only had 2 years of experience." So the way hospitals are shifting now days...experience really doesn't matter. I can do the same exact tasks as any nurse on my floor.

    Im 24 years old, and i am already training to be charge nurse...i have an orientee with me that has a daughter 1 year old than me. Sure, she has admitted to feeling a little uncomfortable with me being her superior. She has stated once she got to know me that has changed. She has taken me seriously.

    yea i do feel a little offended beause people judge all these newbies coming in. Look beyond that, get to know them. No i do NOT have my smart phone out all the time. I am professional when i am at work. yes ill pull it out on my break...because that is my BREAK, that is my time for me to be me and do want i want to do for 30 minutes. So yea...all in all, i have to say hospitals are making a smart BUSINESS move by hiring young, new and eager nurses to work the floors. They are cheaper and can do the same exact thing as any other nurse on the floor. I'm probably repeating myself a lot but think about it...
    I'm in my fifties, and been a nurse much longer than you've been alive. I still enjoy bedside nursing and so do many of my peers. You claim to be offended "because people judge all these newbies coming in" and because the experienced staff joke around about needing to be young, thin and brown haired to be hired. You implore those experienced nurses to look at you a little deeper. I might ask you to look a little deeper at your experienced colleagues. And please don't make judgements about whether or not we're interested in bedside nursing.

    The patients may not understand that more than two years of experience makes a more capable nurse, but you should. Two years is just about long enough to become comfortable in your job, and to think that you know everything, but not long enough to realize how very little you do know. It's a very dangerous time in a nurse's career. They're being asked to precept and to run charge, so they think they're all that. And they aren't yet. They've been identified as nurses who have potential to become great nurses, but not enough experience to be there yet.

    Agism is alive and well in nursing, and especially, it seems, on allnurses.
    LadyFree28, tnmarie, mazy, and 10 others like this.
  4. Visit  Ruby Vee} profile page
    6
    Quote from Jenni811
    it sucks, never said it didn't but its a smart business move because they are cheaper. Its kind of the same deal with ADN vs. BSN...a ADN can do the same, but more people want a BSN. Its the way it goes, tough deal.
    I will probably hate it in 25 years but its reality.
    It is never a smart business move to hire the cheaper, inexperienced employees exclusively without a mix of more experienced staff to train them.
    LadyFree28, prnqday, tnmarie, and 3 others like this.
  5. Visit  Ruby Vee} profile page
    5
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    I have a couple thoughts:

    I've never liked the equating of being thin or muscular or physically fit with being shallow or vapid. If anything, I think it should be associated with positive character traits. It requires self discipline, motivation and hard work.

    And, yes, of course any facility is in trouble if it doesn't have nurses with a wealth of experience. I don't care how bright and energetic or "up to date" new grads are. Experience trumps all. You don't know what you don't know 'cause you don't know it yet.
    At 50, being thin, muscular and/or physcially fit requires self-discipline, motivation and hard work. At 25 all it requires is good genes and a modicum of exercise.
    tnmarie, wooh, imintrouble, and 2 others like this.
  6. Visit  PureLifeRN} profile page
    5
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    At 50, being thin, muscular and/or physcially fit requires self-discipline, motivation and hard work. At 25 all it requires is good genes and a modicum of exercise.
    Yet another example of stereotyping based on age.
    KimberlyRN89, Luckyyou, prnqday, and 2 others like this.
  7. Visit  redhead_NURSE98!} profile page
    9
    Quote from Ruby Vee

    The patients may not understand that more than two years of experience makes a more capable nurse, but you should. Two years is just about long enough to become comfortable in your job, and to think that you know everything, but not long enough to realize how very little you do know. It's a very dangerous time in a nurse's career. They're being asked to precept and to run charge, so they think they're all that. And they aren't yet. They've been identified as nurses who have potential to become great nurses, but not enough experience to be there yet.
    I SO agree. I just hit two years of experience, am often charge on days, and I cringe every time another nurse asks me a "this is what my patient is doing, what would you do in this situation" question. Even people with YEARS of experience approach me with this stuff. I'm fortunate that I love to read things, have read most of our policies and know where to look for what I don't know,as far as policy goes. As far as questions re: "I'm afraid my patient is going downhill, I've called the doctor 3 times," I mean, I really can't help them. If they have that much experience, the only reason they're asking me is so they can add "charge nurse aware" to their notes. My only answer to them is usually to make sure calling the doctor 3 times is documented NOW, BEFORE the patient goes down the drain.

    I was also wanting to tell jenni811 that being a charge nurse makes you no one's "superior." Possibly the opposite, since you may not have realized yet that you're both a sucker and a potential scapegoat. WHY do these people think they're needed as charge? I've got nurses with 15-30 years of experience on my floor that REFUSE to be charge!! Think maybe they've been burnt already?
    LadyFree28, mazy, ColoradoRocky, and 6 others like this.
  8. Visit  prnqday} profile page
    6
    Been reading this thread and I must have to say that out of all the posters ESME12 hit the nail right on the head. ESME12, I think I love you. I'm 24 and ambitious. I have a couple certs but by no means am I just as competent as a nurse with 25 plus years of experience. I just wish employers realized that more experienced nurses are very well needed to train us newer nurses. Yes it is cheaper to hire a nurse with less experience however they will not last if not given adequate orientation.
    My heart breaks for middle aged nurses who are experienced and unexperienced in nursing because no matter what people are always going to sterotype.
  9. Visit  monkeybug} profile page
    5
    Quote from RNdynamic
    In that case, your OP is even worse than I imagined. No new grads? Sounds like a terrible, anti-education, anti-teaching facility to me. Is this in the boonies of Wyoming or something?

    At any rate, it sounds like your facility is going for the next best thing to new grads: young people with little experience and very open minds. Congratulations to them on doing something right.
    One of the best hospitals I ever had the privilege to work at was in the boonies of Wyoming. Amazing patient care, great committed nurses, supportive administration.
  10. Visit  RNdynamic} profile page
    2
    Quote from PureLifeRN
    But if a new, cute nurse writes a post about how she disagrees with her nursing unit hiring a bunch of older, ugly nurses, she would be crucified.

    Its rather immature to write a long post obviously biased against new nurses and then state afterward you weren't meaning to be offensive.

    Every nurse can bring something to the table that is new and exciting. Even 24 year olds.
    Very true. Just reverse the adjectives in the title of this silly thread: "Old, fat, and Ugly New Hires" and just watch the outrage explode from the nurses who identify with that. I think that tells us whom the bias (and jealousy) is truly against.
    KimberlyRN89 and PureLifeRN like this.
  11. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    3
    Quote from RNdynamic
    Very true. Just reverse the adjectives in the title of this silly thread: "Old, fat, and Ugly New Hires" and just watch the outrage explode from the nurses who identify with that. I think that tells us whom the bias (and jealousy) is truly against.
    It is silly of you to stereotype all 'older' nurses as fat and ugly. Please show more respect for the nurses who are old enough to be our mothers, for their life experiences are invaluable.
    LadyFree28, ColoradoRocky, and nursel56 like this.
  12. Visit  nursel56} profile page
    3
    Quote from joanna73
    Something to mention that many new grads (with the exception of second career nurses) have not developed is life skills. Not ALL, but many....before I get flamed....because this comes with living on your own for a while, working various jobs, and developing a solid sense of yourself. This occurs through time and experience. You just don't know at 23 what you know at 40. However, new grads bring an energy to the unit and they've learned the latest in EBP. We learn from each other, and if a unit hopes to thrive, a mix of new grads and seasoned nurses is beneficial. Quite honestly, all the infighting does nothing positive for the profession.
    This is so true. The thing is, it's a conundrum sort of like needing a year of experience to get a job when nobody will hire you without experience. Accepting the value of experience when you have none requires a leap of faith. I figure those who are discounting it because they have no experience themselves just aren't as astute as they proclaim they are. I'm just glad I had the good sense to keep eyes and ears open and mouth shut when I had no experience.

    It does not mean younger, newer people have nothing to contribute! Of course they do! Diversity in most things makes us a stronger whole. There are just times when it's prudent to defer hopping on your soapbox to tell experienced people what's what. For your sake. We've made our mistakes in that regard already.
    joanna73, wooh, and TheCommuter like this.
  13. Visit  imintrouble} profile page
    7
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It is silly of you to stereotype all 'older' nurses as fat and ugly. Please show more respect for the nurses who are old enough to be our mothers, for their life experiences are invaluable.
    I think RNdynamic simply thinks old is ugly, as does most of society. They can't see past the wrinkles, and the thinning hair, to view the depth, strength and character.
    Therein lies the problem
    Last edit by imintrouble on Mar 1, '13
    LadyFree28, Aviationurse, nursel56, and 4 others like this.
  14. Visit  RNdynamic} profile page
    0
    What are your basing your perception on?


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