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Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

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The management at my place of employment recently hired a group of nurses who are all youngish, slim, and physically attractive as a response to declining patient satisfaction scores. Is the solution working? We can only wait and see. You are reading page 6 of Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

RNdynamic has 5 years experience and specializes in Critical Care, Float Pool Nursing.

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Why are there so many negative theads by certain individuals on this board, aimed at lecturing new grads? It's always the same theme, the same people posting it.

Contrary to most of the sheepish comments here, I applaud the facility in the OP for being one of the few who are so willing to hire large numbers of new grads.

Are people afraid of their unit's power structure being threatened or something? Drop the complex already, guys. New grads are the future. The new graduate nurse's role today is more skilled, more technical, relies on a larger body of knowledge, and it is quite honestly way more difficult now than it ever has been. Here's for a change of pace: I applaud all the new graduate nurses who are starting fresh on their orientations. All of them rock, and the more young faces we have, the better off the profession will be, regardless of whether they are thin or not. I know some people resent hearing this, but the young, new nurses are the ones who bring about change to the profession and they are truly the heart of nursing. New grads shouldn't change to the stale culture of their workplace. Instead, they should be actively encouraged to make the workplace change more to their liking.

It is my belief that their young, vibrant personalities and skill with technology will make them far superior nurses than their predecessors have ever been, and I applaud them for that. To all the new grads out there: Holla. Rock on, and continue to show your confidence. You're doing great, and you are fine the way you are.

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A Patient really isn't going to care how much experience their nurse has (to a certain degree). Their satisfaction scores come from a smily face, a good personality, friendly nurses, good customer service etc. I've never heard a patient give a hospital a low satisfaction score because "My nurse only had 2 years of experience."

I take exception to this statement. I personally don't care if you smile all the time. I don't care if you don't say hello, good morning and all that jazz. I don't particularly care if you even remember my name.

What I care about is if you have the skill to make sure that I, or my loved one, will make it safely through the night and into the morning. I want to know that you have the experience and the balls to stand up to the doctor to advocate for our well-being and to tell them that they need to rethink their plan of action. I want you to have the experience to trust your gut when things start to go south.

So yes, I might give a low satisfaction score for lack of experience, because often, that lack of experience will shine like a beacon when it comes to patient care and low confidence in the ability to handle the curveballs.

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 316,451 Visitors; 27,607 Posts

Contrary to most of the sheepish comments here, I applaud the facility in the OP for being one of the few who are so willing to hire large numbers of new grads.

I am the OP. My facility hired no new grads.

None of the new hires are new grads, as my workplace would loathe having to spend staggering amounts of money on 3-month new grad orientations. They all have anywhere from one to six years of experience.

I also notice that my workplace hired no 45-year-old newer nurses, even though plenty of 'older' second-career new nurses are looking for work in the metro area where I live.

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Calabria is a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, OB/GYN.

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Well, I hope that some of you aren't my co-workers.

The vitriol directed at fellow nurses here based on their age, not what they can contribute to their workplace, is disturbing.

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I don't need a nurse who is a new hire who has 10-20 years of experience because they are just as new as i am to that unit. We are learnig the same things and at the same pace.

So you think the only thing you'll learn over the next 10-20 years is how to work on your unit? Not a single bit of experience that would carry over to being a better nurse somewhere else?

I better quit calling my mom for advice. After all, she's never lived in the state that I live in, so what would she know about life...

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Here is the deal.

You need a mix of experienced nurses and new nurses so the experienced nurses can train the new nurses to be good nurses so when the baby boomers retire, sh!t doesn't hit the fan.

Hospitals in my area will not hire new grads. Why?? When the older nurses retire who is going to be there that is experienced?

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I take exception to this statement. I personally don't care if you smile all the time. I don't care if you don't say hello, good morning and all that jazz. I don't particularly care if you even remember my name. What I care about is if you have the skill to make sure that I, or my loved one, will make it safely through the night and into the morning. I want to know that you have the experience and the balls to stand up to the doctor to advocate for our well-being and to tell them that they need to rethink their plan of action. I want you to have the experience to trust your gut when things start to go south. So yes, I might give a low satisfaction score for lack of experience, because often, that lack of experience will shine like a beacon when it comes to patient care and low confidence in the ability to handle the curveballs.
My thoughts exactly.

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Yes, but who is the 24 year old going to learn from, when the 50 year old isn't there? Another 24 yr old???

What's wrong with that, as long as they have plenty of certifications and computer skills?

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Haha, me too. With who? I worked for CAL...before they became UAL. :(

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I wonder, how often do you think this occurs, that a new nurse is hired instead of a nurse with many years of experience?

I would imagine that most nurses with 15, 20 plus years under their belt would not even desire a job that a new nurse is also qualified for. A lot of them have put in their time and moved on, maybe to admin, outpatient, or something else. They usually have the jobs I want but can't get. ;)

Edited by NickiJules

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1,781 Visitors; 18 Posts

I take exception to this statement. I personally don't care if you smile all the time. I don't care if you don't say hello, good morning and all that jazz. I don't particularly care if you even remember my name.

What I care about is if you have the skill to make sure that I, or my loved one, will make it safely through the night and into the morning. I want to know that you have the experience and the balls to stand up to the doctor to advocate for our well-being and to tell them that they need to rethink their plan of action. I want you to have the experience to trust your gut when things start to go south.

So yes, I might give a low satisfaction score for lack of experience, because often, that lack of experience will shine like a beacon when it comes to patient care and low confidence in the ability to handle the curveballs.

So true!

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 316,451 Visitors; 27,607 Posts

I would imagine that most nurses with 15, 20 plus years under their belt would not even desire a job that a new nurse is also qualified for. A lot of them have put in their time and moved on, maybe to admin, outpatient, or something else.
Some of my coworkers are floor nurses with 30+ years of experience. One graduated from nursing school in '79, another in '82, and so forth. And prior to recent changes in the site management team, the facility where I work used to hire very experienced nurses.

To all the new grads out there: Holla. Rock on, and continue to show your confidence. You're doing great, and you are fine the way you are.
They're doing great and everything, but they're not going to stay they way they are, at least physically. One day they'll be 55 years old, constantly skipped over for opportunities, and wondering why it has to be this way.

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