When patients keep calling 911 - page 5

Acute care hospital. Patient doesn't get what she wants from the kitchen: calls 911. Doesn't get a snack because we have to save them for diabetic urgencies: calls 911. Pain med is late or the doctor... Read More

  1. by   NurseCard
    I actually got in trouble over a resident that called 911, once.
    Long story.
    So, this is a sore/sensitive subject for me.
  2. by   hopefulRN'17
    We have legislation for this in Massachusetts but it is never dealt with: 2 1/2 years - fines of up to $5,000. My husband gets frequent fliers... "Can you change the channel", "can you turn my heat up" - I am not joking.... its sad.
  3. by   StellarLeigh
    This is only slightly related to the post... like 5% related.

    In North Carolina, a man was sentenced to 11 to 21 years in prison for making 400+/- bomb threats. Over the summer, this man called numerous businesses in 3 counties with these threats. It was a lot of wal-marts I remember. That is insane, all these places having to shut down and then all the time from the police force!

    But wow, I hope he gets treatment in prison, because he obviously has a psychological problem. I wish prison's would focus on mental health more.

    Ehh, I thought it was an interesting story any-hoo!
  4. by   DaniV.
    Back in my good old days of being a midnight charge (of the WHOLE building), I had a sweet confused lady who insisted she wanted CPR. Attempted to explain multiple times that if she can ASK for CPR, she does not need it. She ended up finding her cell phone and calling 911, so they could give her CPR... fun times on midnight shift!
  5. by   capa
    If the patient is strong enough to ambulate out of room can probably qualify for outpatient care
  6. by   marcos9999
    Quote from JJ the crit RN
    Acute care hospital. Patient doesn't get what she wants from the kitchen: calls 911. Doesn't get a snack because we have to save them for diabetic urgencies: calls 911. Pain med is late or the doctor DCs it: calls 911. OK so what do you do? Confiscate the phone, she comes out to the hall screaming and cursing, follows staff around. Security can't do anything and police can't touch them unless it's a threat. This isn't unusual unfortunately with some of our patients. My guess is we have to put up with it forever. Thoughts?
    You just illustrated how absurd and pathetic our health care system is. It is a travesty to say the least. Where the people with the most responsibility have the least authority. And the people with no responsibility have the power to change things.
  7. by   DNTcode
    Omg, didn't you get my patient???
    What do you do? Discharge them as quickly as possible :0)
  8. by   DJSexton
    I completely understand your frustration. I work on an acute psych unit and it does happen. As RN's we do not tell patients they cannot call 911. But we do tell them in a supportive, structured, and suggestive way that the RN's are the answer and they have to work with us for their concerns. Does the patient really want the police looking for them upon discharge for excessive 911 calls r/t non-criminal matters and abuse of services??? Get them to understand it isn't the option to pursue. I typically build a picture that we've improved their wellbeing while they have been there and that we are committed to continuing to same. There is always the unit manager to call. Have the manager establish a relationship for unit accountability. Good luck!
  9. by   cam55
    Staff will have case manager speak with resident and family, nursing notifies physician. We usually rule out a UTI first, and if negative and calls to 911 persist then we recommend the psychologist to see resident or a Geri social worker for talk therapy. And yes, we have had family members remove phones from room when this problem has persisted.

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