The Disrespect Of Nurses - page 8

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

22,986 Views | 81 Comments

I was at my workplace earlier this month when my supervisor told me about a volatile situation that was unfolding on a different floor between another nurse and a verbally abusive family member. This particular family member was... Read More


  1. 2
    Unions are the answer. Shout it from the rooftops.
    Esme12 and PMFB-RN like this.
  2. 0
    So many things can show up in a persons mind in regard to respect. Let's just say Jo is not a nurse. Jo works at the grocery as a cashier. Is Jo's life threatened because someone forgot to mark the green beans down a nickle? Probably not. But it all depends on the customer's perspective. So Jo's customer thinks that he's been made to over pay at her store on numerous occasions so now that Jo says the can of beans cost 79 cents instead of 74 cents he flips out! So it can be the same of care in a hospital. What I don't get (ER Nurse) is why the people who think we do such a Godawful job keep coming back? Why does the hospital allow people (not usually the patient) to come to the ER and disrupt not only one patient's care but just about everyone's care. Have someone go whacko in the ER we get our dander up! We got each other's back which means that if I'm dealing with the idiot in room 4 then I got 5 other nurses who need to be doing something else in there with me so I don't get killed or maimed. Big hospital downtown has a metal detector and a deputy sitting there when you come in. Little outlying hospital we got none of that. Having a metal detector and a guard make someone respect nurses more? Yes, in a around about way. I'll take any help I can get!
  3. 0
    I totally agree! I always wonder what will happen to me if there comes a time that I have to defend myself (physically) against a patient. I work in a very busy, small ER in a high crime area. We are required to maintain a competency in "non violent self-defense", which is the biggest joke ever! If someone is trying to hurt me, you bet your butt that I'm gonna defend myself any way I can.
  4. 0
    In 40 plus years in nursing, I have seen these scenarios happen many times.
    Same old story, management never backs the nurses and these loud mouth/rude/disresprctful/ threatening people are always sided with.
    Management is only concerned wit their pt. satisfaction surveys.
    And things are worse when there is no such thing as visiting hours.
  5. 0
    Quote from Deidra47
    And things are worse when there is no such thing as visiting hours.
    I totally agree. Policies such as 'open visitation' are more of a hindrance than a help, especially when visitors know they can act like public enemies and basically get away with it.

    Even though healthcare is a 24-hour business, some healthcare settings are totally inappropriate for 24 hour open visitation. Imagine the critical care nurse who has a TBI patient, and family members are camped out at the bedside 24 hours per day aggravating this same patient who desperately needs mininal stimulation plus lots of rest.
  6. 0
    Quote from Sacred eagle
    People disrespect nurses for manyreasons. From the early 70's toabout the 90's in my opinionmany nurses were evil and dida lot of nasty and disrespectfulthings to patients. Today's nursesare paying for the bad deeds theolder nurses committed.
    Sacred Eagle, Your post was too ______, to let it slip by. Would you please elaborate on what these "nasty and disrespectful" things the older nurses, might have done?
  7. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** In 1996 I was a patient in a VA hospital in California. I started in the ICU transfered to step down after 4 days in ICU. After 2 days on stepdown I want to surgical med-surg for another 3 days. My experience with the nurses was terrable. With only one exception I can say that all the nurses who took care of me where mean and nasty and very unfriendly, at least while they were in my room. It wasn't my family either since none came to see me.
    I fully realize they were the exception to the rule, or maybe that hospital was the exception since the physicians weren't any better. I never went back and never would. I do agree with your questioning of the broad brush of past nursing.
    Not to use that broad brush to besmirch ALL VA's, but my own experience hasn't been stellar and I use the largest VA Hospital in the system. The hospital itself is the only facility I never worked at either on staff or mercenary (agency, staff relief) because of the inherent problems with the system. Back when I was even considering it, in the 80's about half of the patient care was done by the patients themselves. They made their own beds with fresh linen, they emptied their own urinals and tracked their own I&O's, and they went to the desk and asked for their meds. I guess the system worked, but it wasn't anything I was used to and I don't like the idea of having to track my patients down or call out the National Guard, just to insure they are okay. This hospital and grounds are massive. Call me a control freak, but ... I couldn't work that way.

    As a patient, it is run very similar to the military, hurry up, and wait. Your time is in no way as valuable as theirs. You are expected to sign in at least a half an hour before your scheduled appointment, so you could get your vitals taken and be ready to see the Doc when your name is called, the problem with that was, the Doc was never ready when your appointment was scheduled. They did a study and found that many weren't adhering to there half hour guidelines, so they made it so the nursing intervention with the vitals and so on would be an appointment unto itself, so from then on if you had an appointment, say for the Pain Clinic at 1400 hrs you also had an appointment to see the Nurse at 1330 hrs for VS and what ever and ALSO, you were expected to show up at the LAB by NOON to insure and lab work was completed and in the chart before your appointment at 1400 hrs. SO, your 1400 hr appointment just turned into a full afternoon, because you aren't likely to see the Doc until at least 1500 and if he writes any scripts and you want to pick them up, you have to confirm them with the Pharmacy and then wait at least an hour, if the prescription is a narcotic, your wait time is increased to at least two hours for some reason, before you can pick them up, so that's 1600 or 1700, wait in line for another half hour and by then you're in afternoon traffic. Good luck with that.
    Last edit by FMF Corpsman on Nov 8, '12 : Reason: Additional text
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from FMF Corpsman
    . Good luck with that.
    That is no way to treat people who have served us. How sad!
  9. 1
    Quote from FMF Corpsman
    Not to use that broad brush to besmirch ALL VA's, but my own experience hasn't been stellar and I use the largest VA Hospital in the system. The hospital itself is the only facility I never worked at either on staff or mercenary (agency, staff relief) because of the inherent problems with the system. Back when I was even considering it, in the 80's about half of the patient care was done by the patients themselves. They made their own beds with fresh linen, they emptied their own urinals and tracked their own I&O's, and they went to the desk and asked for their meds. I guess the system worked, but it wasn't anything I was used to and I don't like the idea of having to track my patients down or call out the National Guard, just to insure they are okay. This hospital and grounds are massive. Call me a control freak, but ... I couldn't work that way.

    As a patient, it is run very similar to the military, hurry up, and wait. Your time is in no way as valuable as theirs. You are expected to sign in at least a half an hour before your scheduled appointment, so you could get your vitals taken and be ready to see the Doc when your name is called, the problem with that was, the Doc was never ready when your appointment was scheduled. They did a study and found that many weren't adhering to there half hour guidelines, so they made it so the nursing intervention with the vitals and so on would be an appointment unto itself, so from then on if you had an appointment, say for the Pain Clinic at 1400 hrs you also had an appointment to see the Nurse at 1330 hrs for VS and what ever and ALSO, you were expected to show up at the LAB by NOON to insure and lab work was completed and in the chart before your appointment at 1400 hrs. SO, your 1400 hr appointment just turned into a full afternoon, because you aren't likely to see the Doc until at least 1500 and if he writes any scripts and you want to pick them up, you have to confirm them with the Pharmacy and then wait at least an hour, if the prescription is a narcotic, your wait time is increased to at least two hours for some reason, before you can pick them up, so that's 1600 or 1700, wait in line for another half hour and by then you're in afternoon traffic. Good luck with that.
    FWIW for the last 5 or 6 years I have been getting my care, includig two sugical procedures accompanied by hospitalizations, at one of the largest VA hospitals in the system. The Mineapolis VA in Minneapolis, MN. I have found the level of care to be superb and the staff worderful.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  10. 0
    My bro in law was recently hospitalized near death at the VA in San Diego and he got amazing, life saving, respectful care.


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