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FMF Corpsman

FMF Corpsman

RETIRED RN
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  1. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    Jlm1206, It sounds to me as if you have put together an excellent plan for your nursing education as well as for the months in between classes. I'm willing to bet you will be a superior Nurse once you have completed your studies. Good luck in all of your future endeavors.
  2. FMF Corpsman

    What draws non-nurses to AN.com?

    My post was meant tongue in cheek, if it was not recieved that way, excuse me, but truth be told, this is yet another reason I count my blessing every day that I am retired from Nursing and no longer have to deal with... Have blessed day, I know I sure will.
  3. FMF Corpsman

    What draws non-nurses to AN.com?

    SAY WHAT? All of that sounds sexist to me. Seriously, I'm not overly concerned with the American Psychological Association; there's is merely a guideline and not necessarily a standard. It's funny how everyone is concerned with political correctness until political correctness isn't in their favor. I personally abhor PC and generally don't practice it's principles as I believe it's simply a reason to skirt the truth or outright lie. I made my point in my post irregardless.
  4. FMF Corpsman

    What draws non-nurses to AN.com?

    I'm not attempting to start a big issue here, but I'm going to turn this around on you dansamy. Knowing that when you joined the group you too were a Patient Care Tech and a Nursing Student, what exactly did you have to offer to the group? Should we all go back to the archives and see what the conversations were like back then? I do understand what you are saying about strictly wanting another's professional opinion and perhaps when we are the OP we need to spell that out in the first draft and ask that replies be limited to practicing Nurses only please. Otherwise, anyone is going to feel free to comment, it is only human nature to want to comfort or offer advice. Either that or we need to close off certain areas such as the Nurses Lounge and utilize it for professionals only.
  5. FMF Corpsman

    What draws non-nurses to AN.com?

    Well dansamy, I am a nurse and probably have been for most of your life and I see your Profile still list you as a Patient Care Tech and a Student Nurse. I would imagine you just haven't bothered to update your profile, so I will give you that, mainly because that isn't what irritates me the most. What is are those who presume that ONLY FEMALES WORK IN NURSING, hence your quote, if a nurse is seeking a nurse's perspective, that's HER choice. I have worked long and hard in this profession and started out in the rice paddies in Viet Nam, as I said, likely before you were even born. It may seem like such a small thing to you and maybe others as well, but I am a Nurse and I'm damn proud of it, and I am a man who has faced the down obstacles in a female dominated profession. I've lived with the jokes and the put downs and put up with being used like a pack animal when males in the profession were few and far between. So please next time you make a statement such as that kindly say, "If a Nurse is seeking a Nurse’s perspective, that's their choice.” Thank you.
  6. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    I couldn't agree more and I can't help thinking if it were a male dominated profession, how different it would be. I just don't understand why it is that a group of educated women can't set down together and eventually form a consensus. But you're right, I've been around the block a time or two myself and heavily involved in several organizations attempting to get people to get more involved and take control of their own future and it was like asking them to stick their hand in a garbage disposal or something. They just didn't seem to grasp the importance of it all. I don't know. It was all very frustrating. Hoping maybe that the passage of time has brought with it a new awareness and a willingness to actually take the reins so to speak, and instead of just going where the horse takes you, go where you want to go.
  7. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    Unfortunately, the State is usually going to side with the business interest over that of the employees, as they tend to share a mutual interest. Which was the point of my previous post. The more Nurses that can join together to make a collective voice, the stronger and more powerful they become. This can be accomplished in the form of a Lobbyist in the State Capital, Unionization, a strong Nursing Organization, anything that can form a cohesive voting block with huge numbers, can effect change. Sitting around and wishing for it, will get you nowhere.
  8. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    Please, excuse me if my comments offend you, they aren't intended that way. I am certain things are much improved from the way they were many years ago and attitudes have changed significantly for the better and after a great deal of hard work. Years ago when I first joined the nursing force, men were few and far between back then and I was often treated as if I were a work horse, only around to lift patients in and out of bed or for much needed brawn if a patient were to get rowdy and out of control, handy to do the male caths, you get the picture. All of this on top of having my own patients to care for. This was a female dominated career field and if I wanted to get along with any hope of progressing, I needed to go along to get along. I was also in school and working full time. One thing I noticed was that the nurses usually got the short end of the stick as far as pay, benefits and other enticements were concerned, such as weekend differentials, uniform allowances, tuition reimbursements, paid ceu's. Yet know one was willing to speak up about it or if they did, they were threatened with termination. No one was willing to listen to a female. They didn't respect the voice at the time. There were very few Nursing Organizations with any clout and if any tried to establish themselves they were shut down by Administration and the instigators were terminated and blackballed. Sadly, today the Nursing field is still way behind where it should be because of it's late start, and male dominated professions enjoy salaries, benefits and other perks nurses won't come to enjoy for another 20 years. All because women aren't/weren't willing to speak up and demand what should rightfully be theirs. The old saying that "women should be kept barefoot and pregnant," has been utilized by male chauvinist for years to keep women down and "keep them in their place." I love one of the signatures that Esme12 uses on her posts, "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent".... Eleanor Roosevelt. I love it because it is so very true and it is a great affirmation, whether it is someone on your unit, a Physician who does rounds on the unit and always bust your chops, your Unit Manager or even just another team member, you have to let them put you down and only you have the power to stop them. As far as your career goes, only you can make it go better too. I made the changes in my own career path that I needed to make and ended up where I called the shots on the very units where I once worked lugging people out of bed, guess what, I still had to help get people in and out of bed. Nursing is nursing and some things never change. Lol. But, there are things that we can change if we work together to change them, they'll never change if we simply set around and say we need for change to come about and let it go at that. It's like the Chinese Proverb. "Give a basket to two people, Which do you think will get full faster, One who sits and merely wishes or One who gets up, goes and fishes? Lesson being, you have to act.
  9. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    Actually, I beg to differ with you. The State Legislatures could play a pivotal role in the number of students that the indivual schools allow to graduate each year. The State Legislatures would then simply pass on to the Board of Education the new GUIDELINES, and fewer students would utter forth onto the job markets.
  10. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    I'm not exactly certain where to start, but since you decided to unload on my particular specialty with both barrels, start I will. I'm interested in what exactly you might consider your own personality, since everyone else in the ICU were deemed to be so hostile, especially since you later go on to include yourself in "their typical actions as Charge Nurses," like assigning the heaviest load to nurses who brag so much, just to see if they can back up their mouth's. You also state/complain that everyone there is trying to get into CRNA and yet you can't tell them anything because they already know so much, yet you come back later in your post to tell us that YOU ARE GLAD TO BE IN CRNA school. I'm glad you are as well. Hopefully, that will be a good fit for you. But I have a question, What is so wrong about teaching someone how to use the "Balloon Pump?" it doesn't matter if s/he is oriented to the Heart Team, Trauma Team, or the Olympic Team. You may or may not remember this, but they use to say the same thing about the Defibrillator. It was a highly specialized piece of equipment and only Medical Doctors could ever be taught to use them. Teaching someone how to use something doesn't take anything away from you, in fact, it might actually help you one day, you never know. It doesn't mean that they are now certified in its use, or even oriented to the Heart Team. It simply means he might have basic knowledge on how the machine works. As far as personalities in the ICU, I'll grant you most of them are type A, but that's exactly the type of person that is needed to do the job. Anyone who has been there for a while is definitely a type A; otherwise, they wouldn't have been able to handle the stress. Other personality types simply cannot deal with the types of trauma they are continually bombarded with day after day and expected to treat them and move on, regardless of their own feelings. People whose brains are pouring out of the side of their crushed skulls from a MC vs. Tree, crash without a helmet, in the next bed may be a former coworker who has suffered a stroke. The Unit is filled with cases such as these day after day, week after week and the staff must grin and bear it. Is there any wonder they might not always have such rosy personalities all of the time or deal with people they aren't familiar with in more than a cursory shrug? Critical Care and Trauma Nurses tend to be guarded and aloof, they aren't always accustomed to having to deal with people who are perpendicular. Give them a coma patient or someone in need of a great deal of care and then you will see the love and compassion.
  11. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    The only problem with having an internship on nights is that there are far less procedures and therefore less learning opportunities in your average hospitals, then than there are on 3 to 11 and especially on 7 to 3. Or for those on 12's, 7a -7p. For those fortunate enough to be interning in Level One trauma Facilities, it might be a different story, but even then, chances of newbie's landing fresh traumas are few and far between there as well, and whoever does, isn't going to have the spare time to mentor a student or intern. However, the schedules may very just enough that they can get in more treatments and procedures on the other patients than those in lower status hospitals and LTC facilities. Schools' cranking out far too many students has been a problem throughout the ages or at least since I was in school and graduated. My graduating class numbered 92 and we started with 130. A few years later someone started the never ending rumor that there was a nursing shortage, and it was true for a while, but it soon abated, but the schools keep turning out student nurses like a mother rabbit turns out babies, please do not take offense at that anyone, as I mean it in the best possible way. But there is now a glut of nurses and the ability for nurses to negotiate with HR or Administration effectively is non-existent, which leaves us with fewer benefits and at lower salaries in many areas of the Country. I know most of the Country is going through dire straits right now, but we started out at a lower place on the grid to begin with, so when the economy rebounds we will still be lower than most. We need to lobby Congress to initiate bills which will limit the number of students churned out each commensurate with the number of expectant retirees and nurses expected to leave the field to pursue other interests, thereby lessening the glut instead of increasing it.
  12. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    It has been lingering in the conversation, but never really said out loud, those Nurses who try to fast track themselves and skip over as many steps as they possibly can, are doing THEMSELVES a grave disservice. They should be taking every opportunity they are offered or can find, to expound on their education and experience. Many nurses only take the CEU's that are required for re-licensure, and frequently at the last minute, while they should be finding educational offerings that are available in their particular fields of interest or practice, not because they need too, but because it makes them a better Nurse. This is a relatively inexpensive way to advance their knowledge and to network with other professionals who work in the same areas they do, but in different facilities. It is also a great idea to join professional organizations, depending on the situation; many of these things are tax deductable. This sort of goes back to the Nurse versus nurse conversation. If someone really wants to excel in their career, they need to be willing to work at it. You can only get out of it, what you are willing to invest of yourself. If you aren’t willing to put anything into it, you can’t expect to go far and trust me, if that is the case, you will live up to your expectations.
  13. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    LadyFree28, You almost made that sound as if it was something hard to believe. At any rate, I applaud your efforts to achieve your own goals in your own manner and not allowing roadblocks to be put in your way. As I said in another post, those in HR and Administration who design and set up these programs really don't have a clue as to what might be best for you, in fact they aren't working to make things better for you at all, they could even be working against you. Not even Career Counselors know everything that will benefit you in the end, and unless you are paying them yourself, they don't actually work for you so their fiduciary is with someone else first. Only you know what your goals are and it is up to you to figure out how best to achieve them. It sounds to me like you have done that, so good luck and you will do well in your career.
  14. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    As I said, I was hopeful I was mistaken as that is a very drastic mistake and one I wish Hospital HR's and even Nursing Agencies and LTC facilities, would learn not to make.
  15. FMF Corpsman

    New grads being rushed into "nursing maturity"

    I'm afraid this is turning into a discourse where some of us will simply have to agree to disagree. I will never agree that a new grad should be allowed to cut their teeth in an intensive care unit as counted staff. If they are working under a Preceptor, okay, but not as a staff member, they simply do not have the required skills or the mental acuity needed to work in that capacity. If you think they do, then I question your judgment as well. Do you think that Certified Orthopedic Surgeons grow on trees? Yes, there are Orthopods that function in the field, but to be Certified or even before you specialize as an Orthopedic Surgeon, you have to start out somewhere in General Medicine. You don't graduate from med school as an Orthopedic Surgeon. To be Certified as an Orthopedic Surgeon you have to take the specialty Boards as I'm sure you know.
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