Talk down to no one...please!

  1. 25
    This may be more of a rant or maybe a suggestion or a reminder, but hopefully it doesn't offend.

    I am currently a CNA working full time+, going to nursing school, and raising 3 children. In my past life I managed very large construction projects in the commercial HVAC and plumbing industry. Shortly after the housing market plummeted, so did the commercial market, so here I am switching careers in my 30's. I was devastated when I was first laid off, but looking back now it's the best thing that could have happened. I'll soon have my RN and I love the healthcare field.

    Here is my issue. So many nurses, mostly new nurses have such swelled egos. I get it. You just finished nursing school. You should be proud. Unfortunately, after trying to help new nurses at work, I've found that they become argumentative and exclaim, "I went to nursing school, I should know!". Now, I'm not telling them how to do their job. It's usually just reminding them to wear proper PPE per our hospital policy. I'm not nasty. I'm just looking out for them, because I know they are new.

    The other issue I have is that some of them tell me that I won't make it and that it will be the hardest thing I've ever done. Some of this has to do with the fact that I have a pituitary tumor (not life-threatening) and look like I'm fresh out of high school! Listen. I'm not discrediting anyone here, but nursing school is not close to the hardest thing I've done and I believe before anyone tells someone that, they need to realize that not everyone had an easy upbringing. I won't go into detail, but I've been through enough that there is no schooling that will scare me. Now, I don't mind if they tell me it will be tough and are being helpful and offering assistance. It's just the nurses that tell me that I cannot do it and act as though I am beneath them. I'm old enough (technically) to be a father to a few of them haha.

    Anway, I think my point is that anyone working in the medical field has a lot to be proud of, but this world does not move without every single person doing their part. You should thank your housekeeper, your garbage man, your plumber, and whomever else makes life easier for you. I respect everyone who wears blue (or whatever color your job makes you wear), I'm just looking for a little in return.
    Emergent, HikingEDRN, VickyRN, and 22 others like this.

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  2. 19 Comments...

  3. 18
    Quote from jasonj880
    I respect everyone who wears blue (or whatever color your job makes you wear), I'm just looking for a little in return.
    Well-said! Each and every person in existence has intrinsic value, and therefore, should be treated as if they matter (because they do).
    Lola Lou, VickyRN, Twinmom06, and 15 others like this.
  4. 2
    As a student, I went out of my way to thank the CNA's and anyone else who was giving me guidance/words/assistance and I vowed to do that when I got my first job too. I've seen how some people are treated and I don't want to be that person.
    Mr Sacdiff and nandosport like this.
  5. 1
    "I respect everyone who wears blue (or whatever color your job makes you wear), I'm just looking for a little in return."

    You deserve every bit of it too. I went to school as a "non traditional" student and it wasn't easy. It can be challenging doing the "work, school, kids" juggling act. And I had a few "naysayers" tell me I probably won;t make it. Luckily- they weren't people who mattered (just like these people aren't people who matter!)

    That being said- nursing school was easily the best decision I've ever made and KUDOS to you for doing it!
    Mr Sacdiff likes this.
  6. 1
    Well said. This is why I am glad I became a CNA first. I've had so many nurses more than willing to help me with CNA tasks…I've also had some nurses who wouldn't dare help and if the patient wanted cold water, they would call me. This has taught me to thank EVERY individual for their help, you don't realize how much of a help they are until you don't have them anymore. (Volunteers to help walk patients out of the hospital when you are super busy, radiology tech that transfers each patient to and from an exam, dietary whom bring the patients dinners to the unit..I couldn't imagine having to go to the cafeteria to pick up everyone's dinner).
    jennifer_app likes this.
  7. 4
    Just keep on keeping on and ignore the haters. Some people feel threatened when they see a good CNA who knows *gasp* something about life, and even something about nursing! Many are quick to dismiss us as unintelligent.


    There is a reason not all nurses are CNA's first, and sometimes that reason is because they could never do it in a million years. Don't forget that!

    You'll graduate and work along side these people soon enough. When you're way better at your job than they are they'll shut up ;-)
    emmylue72, jadelpn, bristolrover, and 1 other like this.
  8. 4
    Quote from Glycerine82


    There is a reason not all nurses are CNA's first, and sometimes that reason is because they could never do it in a million years. Don't forget that!

    I think nursing schools should require all applicants to work as a CNA for at least 6 months before they are admitted.
    poppycat, nursejoed, Qteapi, and 1 other like this.
  9. 5
    One thing I learned many years ago, long before my career change to Nursing, was to always be nice and show respect to everybody, because one of those people may, at a later time and place, be in a position to make your life a living hell.

    Example: a guy I knew who worked in sales walked into a business and asked a person in the warehouse to see "the boss" (he was looking for the purchasing agent). The person directed him to the purchasing agent, who retired a few months later. The warehouse guy was then promoted to purchasing agent. When the sales rep returned the next time around, the former warehouse guy turned purchasing agent remembered what he interpreted as arrogance on the part of the sales rep and refused to buy anything from him. That rep lost a ton of business; had he addressed the warehouse guy in a friendly way and asked for the purchasing agent, he would not have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of business. Yeah, some people hold grudges.

    In a hospital setting, bear in mind that the CNA or cafeteria clerk may be attending college for a degree in Hospital Administration (or similar). The best people do not bear a grudge, but those people are (sadly) rare.
    nandosport, Emergent, canigraduate, and 2 others like this.
  10. 6
    Quote from Overland1
    One thing I learned many years ago, long before my career change to Nursing, was to always be nice and show respect to everybody, because one of those people may, at a later time and place, be in a position to make your life a living hell.
    I really did LOL at this, because I was expecting one of those lines like, "... be nice to everybody because you never know what they're going through..." The actual line was superb.
  11. 2
    They'll soon learn that looking out for your CNA, will keep your day running smooth.
    I know a CNA that's probably not as nice as you. And she would ignore the nurses that treated her badly.
    I've always took time to thank and help my CNA's. These poor new nurses better get it together, and soon!
    nandosport and bristolrover like this.


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