Score one for standardized scrub colors - page 3

A year ago, I went to an Urgent Care clinic that my employer had just acquired. The treatment was OK, but I was disappointed to see Medical Assistants calling themselves "Nurses" and being referred to as such by coworkers - a... Read More

  1. 2
    Quote from Paco-RN
    I did my community health clinical @ a facility where medical assistants, LPNs and RNs alike were collectively referred to as nurses. I asked the acting director of nursing about this once and he said it fosters teamwork and avoids inferiority. I still think licensed nurses should be identified as such.
    Well, lovely for the MAs to get that little boost to their egos, but what about those who really did go to the trouble and effort of getting their nursing degress and licenses.
    SoldierNurse22 and Violach like this.

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  2. 1
    Quote from proud nurse
    Nametags showing a persons title should be enough to identify their role at the facility. I don't see the need to color code the staff, and if I were a patient I'm not sure if I'd even care.
    In my mind, I could care less if patients notice/care. As a staff member, I find it quite helpful to be able to identify a fellow staff member's "role" from a distance. Individuality is great, but save it for outside of the work place.
    Violach likes this.
  3. 5
    Quote from Paco-RN
    I did my community health clinical @ a facility where medical assistants, LPNs and RNs alike were collectively referred to as nurses. I asked the acting director of nursing about this once and he said it fosters teamwork and avoids inferiority. I still think licensed nurses should be identified as such.
    I dislike this "feeling of inferiority" that seems to be running around. People work darn hard for their titles and they are the ones who deserve to be called as such. You don't see the ARNP's and PA's demanding to be called MD just so they "feel better" about themselves. I am not an RN, I only work in the lab but when someone tries to call me a med. tech I always correct them. I didn't do that schooling I certainly don't deserve to be called an MT.
    There is nothing wrong with helping someone feel they could do better. Lifting people too high is more hurtful to them in the long run. Nothing fosters "complacency" (I think I'm looking for a stronger word here??) like being told you don't need to better yourself.
    SoldierNurse22, psu_213, Violach, and 2 others like this.
  4. 4
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    A year ago, I went to an Urgent Care clinic that my employer had just acquired. The treatment was OK, but I was disappointed to see Medical Assistants calling themselves "Nurses" and being referred to as such by coworkers - a common practice in clinics.

    Since then, my employer decreed all job functions would have standard uniform colors. I was fine with the change, but many coworkers sure raised a hue and cry.

    I went back to that same Urgent Care today. Since my last visit it had been expanded into a full 24 hour Emergency Department/Urgent Care clinic.

    I immediately noticed they had changed to the standard colors as I knew the role of every single person I interacted with. An RT checked me in and an RN took my vitals and information. After a fairly long wait (expected) an RN escorted me to the exam room where a Medical Assistant (who introduced herself as a Medical Assistant) verified my information.

    A tech arrived and set up the suction canister that had not been reset properly after the last visitor. A HUC then came in and verified my insurance, employment, and address information.

    The MD, in generic blue surgical scrubs, was the only person I ran into without a standard uniform - which was not a problem.

    As a patient, I greatly appreciated the changes - especially the ending of the non-nursing personnel calling themselves, "nurses." The standard uniform colors were also appreciated and I think did a lot to stamp out the "role confusion" of MAs/Nurses.

    Thanks!

    Seems to me you're saying the care was better because the caregivers were wearing a certain color of scrubs? You've been drinking the tea that management is serving.

    Most patients have no idea what color scrubs the nurse is wearing as opposed to the RT, the PT, the OT or the gal from the pharmacy that drops off our meds. They'll ask her for a boost up in bed, as the RT for a snack and the holler at the nurse about what time their medications are coming up from pharmacy. Even if you provide a color chart, most people still don't get it. ID badges work -- if people read them. Introducing yourself as an RN, RT or whatever works -- if the patient listens and has no memory issues.

    The color coded scrubs are a fad perpetuated from management on nursing . . . it'll go out of style eventually. I can't wait!
    samadams8, Altra, hiddencatRN, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from psu_213
    In my mind, I could care less if patients notice/care. As a staff member, I find it quite helpful to be able to identify a fellow staff member's "role" from a distance. Individuality is great, but save it for outside of the work place.
    Is there some reason you cannot identify a colleague's role from a distance just by identifying the colleague? Personally, I know my colleagues and remember their roles.
    samadams8 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Is there some reason you cannot identify a colleague's role from a distance just by identifying the colleague? Personally, I know my colleagues and remember their roles.
    In the ED, usually. When I take a pt to the ICU, I don't know the nurses from anyone else.
  7. 1
    Quote from hudabelle
    I dislike this "feeling of inferiority" that seems to be running around. People work darn hard for their titles and they are the ones who deserve to be called as such. You don't see the ARNP's and PA's demanding to be called MD just so they "feel better" about themselves. I am not an RN, I only work in the lab but when someone tries to call me a med. tech I always correct them. I didn't do that schooling I certainly don't deserve to be called an MT.
    There is nothing wrong with helping someone feel they could do better. Lifting people too high is more hurtful to them in the long run. Nothing fosters "complacency" (I think I'm looking for a stronger word here??) like being told you don't need to better yourself.
    I agree.

    Also, does this mean that MAs are on the same pay scale RNs? I would think making 1/3 the wage of someone else would certainly foster inferiority.
    hudabelle likes this.
  8. 1
    If I'm really sick, I'm not going to want to have to remember that the RN is navy, the aide is tan, the resp therapist is maroon, etc. Just let me look at the name tag and I'll be able to figure things out right away without having to grope for a key, then try to match what the person is wearing to what's on the key.
    samadams8 likes this.
  9. 0
    to heck with just laypersons! i am a new rn and new to my facility...i know that nurses wear navy. (ob/nurs folks can wear pink undershirts and their pink tag thats all)....but i didnt know the "colors" of my fellow employees, so when i had a question about a resp med and working with a venti mask in a model ive never seen, i looked for someone in purple, who is an RT at my place. i like it when i can see the green PT people walking down my hall and i can be happy that one patient will be occupied for a bit while i take a snack :-)
    Last edit by SNB1014 on Mar 18, '13 : Reason: misspelling
  10. 0
    I personally like the idea of color coded uniforms and here's why. I would appreciate being identified as a RN immediately when I enter a room. A hospital is a place of work and professionalism. Pt's respond to uniforms. Scrubs have become more like pajamas..or workout attire. What patient will take my patient teaching seriously if I am wearing spongebob scrubs? Can you blame them?


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