MD screaming at RN's in front of patients regularly - page 2

by AtivanIM | 7,185 Views | 48 Comments

I currently work with an Psych MD that is also the Medical Director of a psych unit. I've never met such a rude doctor in my life! I'm a pretty new nurse and have only been working at the hospital for less than 6 months. She... Read More


  1. 14
    I would document, tell managers, call labor union if needed, or contact medical board. As far as when it was happening:


    Doctor: "Yell yell yell like a rabid donkey"

    Me: "Excuse me? I am a person, a registered nurse, and your coworker, and you will lower your voice and treat me with respect, or this conversation is done."
    suiteums, SwansonRN, DizzyLizzyNurse, and 11 others like this.
  2. 15
    Advise from the hood : Raise your eyebrows, put one hand on your hip, slightly lower your head, curl your lips, put your hand up and say girl please and show Miss Thang who really runs the show.
    Think Nene form real housewives of atlanta. If you can pull it off (I have many a times), you will send a clear and resounding message.
    Of course, this is if all else fails and following all the "proper" ways to handle the situation dont work.
    ThePrincessBride, suiteums, SwansonRN, and 12 others like this.
  3. 6
    Sometimes, your first job in nursing is a complete bust. It's OK, it happens. Look for another job. In the meantime, document and file incident reports as others have advised. Tell HR in your exit interview that the doctor's behavior and the company's unwillingness to do anything about it is THE reason you're leaving.
  4. 5
    Sad. You know if everyone stood up for themselves people would actually respect nurses. I would never let anyone talk to me like that Dr. or otherwise just on a matter of principal I'd rather be fired than be disrespected.

    I have a hunch that she thinks she can yell at you just because she went to medical school and with her messed up logic that makes her better than you.
  5. 4
    I would look to find a new nursing job as soon as you can! Get the heck out of there! But before you do, you need to file incident reports and talk to HR and/or your manager and their manager about it. Write the doc up. They deserve it. You could also report it to the state agency that oversees your facility. And potentially to the state medical board.

    My first nursing job was a total bust - all kinds of horrible things my coworkers did but worse was, my manager (and her manager, and her manager's manager) cared more about staffing numbers than things that could be legal problems. Yah, okay. Pssh, I started looking for new jobs before I'd been there 8 weeks. I only stayed 13 weeks. Everyone who was guilty that I'd reported time and time again are no longer at that facility, including my former manager. My second job I stayed the rest of the year I've worked so far. It was a pay cut and neuro med surg tele, so some of our patients were brutal. But it was much better than the first job. I've switched jobs again to focus on a specialty, (I hope to stay with this healthcare system for a long time as things are great and employee satisfaction is good from year to year).

    It's not professional suicide. You just have to be smart about it. I made the choice at 7-8 weeks into my job that my license and well being were more important than what looked good for work history on a resume. I'm young, and I spent 4.5 years at one non-nursing job in high school and college so that proves I can and will do it, given the right circumstances. You have to frame the situation as positive as possible when looking for a new job.
    pyriticsilence, AtivanIM, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  6. 16
    This happens because the facilities allow it to happen.
    abbaking, dudette10, pyriticsilence, and 13 others like this.
  7. 3
    We have a lateral violence policy where I work. It says that things need to be handled in private. If anyone is rude to anyone for any reason in front of a third person, that's a voilation of policy and a write up. Not that doctor's still arent rude, they are. They just do it over the phone.
    AtivanIM, lindarn, and gonzo1 like this.
  8. 4
    Document, document, document. Note, day, time, witnesses, etc. I would not be above filming her with my camera phone.

    Please report this physician to the hospital, Risk Management, and don't forget the State Medical Board. I would go so far, as to contact the law firm who represents/defends, the hospital. And speak to the Senior Partner.

    I reported a physician to the State Medical Board a while back. The individual who I spoke to, told me that he wished that nurses would ALWAYS report physicians when they act like this, are incompentent, etc. It starts a paper trail on the physician. This way, in a couple of years, when the you know what hits the fan, and the physician is finally being held accountable for their incompetance, the physician's attorney cannot tell the Medical Board, that his/her, client has an immaculate record- no complaints whatsoever. And he would probably be right. No one ever files a complaint to the most important agency of all- the State Medical Board.

    Also, my usual mantra- make copies of every and all Incident Reports for everything. If/when the time comes, your documentation will still be in your possesion, and even if it, "disappears", you have the original copies. They can and will disappear and it will be your word against theirs- and theirs usually will win, and you will get thrown under the bus.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN,CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
  9. 1
    The ANA has a webpage just for workplace violence: Bullying and Workplace Violence

    You might contact your union rep.
    AtivanIM likes this.
  10. 5
    Many facilities have a physician reporting system. She has a boss, too... there is no reason she should be treating ANYONE like this!


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