Male nurses dominate b/c they are Male?

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    i work in an area where there are more male nurses then any other place I have worked. Don't get me wrong, this is not a bad thing. I just noticed recently, that the men are being chosen to supervise more often then females. Several months after being hired on nocs, a new male charge was hired. I didn't think anything of it as he did have many years of varied experience. And in the beginning he was good, then it turned. It turned out he had a Problem and was removed from the facility. So now his position was vacant. And even though there were at least three females qualified to do his position, the other male working this area(1/3rd the exp of his female counterparts) has taken over. Then as I look out further to other areas in my facility, i notice the same trend. Males with less experience are placed as leaders above their female counterparts with many more years experience. What gives? Do females need a male to lead? I wonder as the males were placed there by management that were mostly female. Just curious. What are your experiences?
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  3. 23 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Generally, I find women in positions of charge and middle management. I suspect this is related to the fact that more women are nurses.
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    Personally, I think that being a man makes you hypervisible in the healthcare field....as a tech, many patients go to say...."oh, that one CNA, he was good/bad/etc..." and management usually asks them if it was me (as there's only one on days, and one on nights....)
    We talked about this in theory one day, and it works on the priciple that men are usually leaders, and supposedly have the "natural ability" to be in charge....so they are promoted...it's the old glass ceiling debate. When you are hypervisible, you are considered and remembered over the other 3-4 women who were all similar....just a HR kind of thing, I guess....so that's part of the rationle...
    x_coastie likes this.
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    Well, sorry to say, many times I have seen a lesser qualified male get a promotion or even have one hired from the outside before a woman gets the "leadership" role. Once, being young and prickly, :uhoh21:I asked my supervisor why a male nurse with 0 experience in psych got the charge position when I, with 6 or so years, did not. She said it was common because men had to raise their children, and thus had a greater need for more money. That explanation sucked in this situation, because, while both of us were gay, my sister, niece and unemployed bro-in-law lived with me, and I sure as sunrise needed the money more than he and his MD partner!!!:angryfire:angryfire
    lindarn likes this.
  7. 4
    Ummmm...

    She said it was common because men had to raise their children, and thus had a greater need for more money. That explanation sucked in this situation
    No, it didn't 'suck'. It is illegal.

    http://www.eeoc.gov/abouteeo/overview_practices.html
    jlcole45, Plagueis, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  8. 4
    In my experience, when a position vacated, whether management or clinical, no one can just "take over." The posting is sent to HR, which posts the position publicly for a set # of days. After the deadline, HR reviews the applicants and sends them to the manager, who is ultimately deciding who's hired. I've seen my share of male as well as female charge nurses, managers, educators, etc. Years of experience don't necessarily qualify you for the job. I'm sure there were other factors taken into consideration. I would have to know more of the story before judging anyone, especially based on gender.
    RNSC, theatredork, ramonmalino, and 1 other like this.
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    Ok first question how many of you asked or applied for the position? I'm a male nurse
    working for almost 2years. I have been asked to be a charge nurse which I turned down. Why was I ask? I think for speaking up about issues, not afraid to question people and being fair with all the people I work with. Some of the nurse I work with male and female have 20+ years and have no idea whats going on day to day and ***** about work and wounder why they can't be charge nurse.
    On a upnote a fellow classmate from day one has been in charge of the hospitals med tech teaching all the nurse on the computer system and she is a female.
    I think it comes down to Marketing yourself for the position nothing is free..
    RNSC, Mexarican, x_coastie, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Ummmm...

    No, it didn't 'suck'. It is illegal.

    http://www.eeoc.gov/abouteeo/overview_practices.html
    probably not, when it happened, now-yes....and a manager wouldnt say it....
  11. 0
    In many male-dominated fields, the men sit around wondering why a woman was promoted over a male, too. Sometimes a male is the right person for the job, and sometimes, it is a woman.
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    I'm the charge nurse of my unit on days. When the last charge nurse vacated it, I was the most qualified...end of discussion.

    The highest ranking chief of my facility is female, however, all other other VP positions under her (which over the last decade she's hired) are held by males, including the VP of patient care that covers nursing. So you might be onto something.

    I have heard stories of favoritism for male nurses, but honestly I haven't seen it, as most of the males in charge have earned it. All the managers, but for one, and all the directors where I work are females (it's their bosses who are all male, like I stated above). So men haven't made many strides there.

    But male favoritism in leadership positions obviously isn't unheard of.


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