Angry Nurse - page 10

I am wondering if this has happened to any of you.... I got "talked to" by my Assistant Nurse Manager (charge nurse) because of an incident with a patient. My patient asked for some water, and I went... Read More

  1. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    Originally posted by oramar
    There was one poster here on another thread that said the joint commission informed her that telling patients that staffing was short was a form of intimidation.
    How is that intimidation? Puhleez.

    I will NEVER intentionally mislead a patient about anything and safety being one of the major ones.

    Let the Joint Commission strip me of my license then. I refuse to cover up a problem like this.
  2. Visit  Gromit profile page
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    Originally posted by Jay-Jay
    I really don't believe this!! What are we, for heaven's sake -- waitresses?? In most hospitals I've worked in, the ice machine is out in the corridor, and patients/family are encouraged to help themselves! If they need water, there's a bathroom right in the patient's room!! Also, fetching water is NOT a nursing responsibility...usually health care aides or other less skilled staff are expected to do this task.
    Uhm, I beg to differ, but this definately also falls within the bounds of nursing care. A good nurse will have good cna skills as well. But if you are too good to fetch water, or clean a patient, then you are way too good to be a nurse at my facility. Under ideal conditions, the CNAs, NTs and such will do these chores, but what happens when they are short, or overloaded? The patient goes without?
    When I was in EMS, and became a medic, I had no problem doing bls-level work. When I graduate and become an RN, I expect to follow in the examples of my bosses (the LPNs and RNs I work under) and do the 'menial tasks' as well, when possible. They know their patients, and their CNAs and NTs respect and prefer to work with them.

    As for your ice machines, I can only say that on my floor, we require strict I/O monitoring, so the patients do not have access to the ice machine or the 'kitchen'. True, they could use the faucet in their bathroom, but >I< wouldn't. (No real reason why. The facility is very clean, but just has bad connotations, I guess.)
    =Anyway, just my 2 cents worth.
    Last edit by Gromit on Dec 5, '02
  3. Visit  Tweety profile page
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    "I tend to think this son was unreasonable with the fact he called community relations instead of hearing an explanation on the whys the request was not done immediately."


    I agree with the above. People are selfish-pigs sometimes. This son probably hasn't done a thing for mom the last 15 years and now thinks he's doing mom a favor. Or he's just one of those selfish pigs who use intimidation to get what they want in the world.

    I've have been in a code situation and have had families get beligerent that we weren't available.


    Anyway, think of it as you would charting. You wouldn't chart that you couldn't do something do to short staffing because you are setting yourself up.

    A judge or the nursing board would ask you "why did you not report to management that your assignement was become unsafe". Agggghhh!
    Last edit by 3rdShiftGuy on Dec 6, '02
  4. Visit  Motivated, SN profile page
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    Wow! What a wonderful thread! All very valid points. It has prompted me to want to start asking the general public in my area what their perceptions are of being in the hospital; and their feelings about the shortage. I understand administrations point about not wanting to give patients ammunition for potential lawsuits, by using the shortage to blame for things which may not be related; but I also feel they have a right to know. Nothing
    says we can't talk to people and educate them before they are
    patients "customers" ugggh. So much politics and BS makes me
    sick. But not sick enough to want to be in a hospital. Florence
    Nightengale is probably turning over in her grave.
  5. Visit  K O'Malley profile page
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    3rd shift guy, I can't tell you how many times I have had to deal with families or patients who demanded immediate attention during a code situation. Explaining to them what is going on just doesn't seem to cut any ice. I have had a family member jump all over me after I had been tied up with an admission who was circling the drain. Just recently I received a pt. back from a cardiac procedure in critical condition. One of my other pt's reported me for neglecting her, even after explaining to her what was going on. She had wanted crackers and coke and noone brought them. Our manager fell all over herself apologizing for the neglect.
  6. Visit  l.rae profile page
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    once, on a particularly manic shift in ER, l was in triage. l was asked by a co-worker to hang a iv fluid for her...so o go and get lambasted about how its been 30 min, mom has to use the BR, the BR is in the exam room about 7ft away, mom is weak but ambulatory....full code and a Care Flight has just occurred. Dgt state, "yes, l know there was a code and blah blah blah...but that is no excuse."..Mom of course is very nice and understanding but dgtr just rales on and on..."uncaring nurses, unorganized"...more blah blah blah..so l say, l am sorry this happened, but at the time your mom had to go to the BR, there was a life threatening situation and unfortunately it just took priority."...then dgtr says, " know all about life threatening priorities, I AM A NURSE IN ICU!".....in fact, she worked at our main site hospital a few miles down the road. She proceeded to ask for the supervisor and told her under no circumstances was that "blond bytch" to enter her mom's room again....hey fine with me....ok and so dgtr is a nurse and can't walk mom to the BR?...give me a break.......LR
  7. Visit  sanakruz profile page
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    Amen Tiara! Sanshin 99- why would asking for water make the pt (or their family) a PIA? This is after all a legitimate reguest; And hollykate- lying to the patient is a better solution than stating a fact? Please tell me why it would be "unprofessional" to tell someone you a short staffed?
  8. Visit  abrenrn profile page
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    Wow, another great thread. I apologize for only reading some of the posts before posting myself but I did scan a lot.

    With patients, I find myself in a double bind. I really believe the patient needs to trust me, the physician and the hospital in order to heal. When I find myself blaming the physician or the hospital for something the patient should have recieved (e.g. a glass of water), I feel I have broken the patients trust.

    Problem is, hospitals and doctors don't seem to feel that about nurses. Something goes wrong? Quickest answer - blame the nurse. But it's a bad answer as the patient loses trust in the nurse. Best answer is always to validate patients concerns, damn right patient should have gotten the water, without blaming. This hospital let the patient blame the nurse.

    It goes on everywhere and I don't know how to stop it. I'm tired of being blamed yet I can't blame the hospital - not to the patient. So, I am on sabbatical. In the meantime I pass things on to people who are not sick in the hospital. Things like, "You hear about that shortage? Can't be too bad. I've spent four months applying for jobs and I still don't have one. You'd think they would take anyone with a license that's still breathing. I think they are too busy complaining about the nursing shortage to do anything about it."

    So far, best I can do because nobody seems to want to say it out loud. Not many people hear me, only a few, but, hey, you have to start somewhere.
  9. Visit  Q. profile page
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    Holy crap I didn't realize this thread was started nearly 2 years ago!!!
  10. Visit  abrenrn profile page
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    Susy - I started from the beginning but I didn't notice the date. Thanks for pointing it out. Things don't change fast, do they?
  11. Visit  Tweety profile page
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    Originally posted by K O'Malley
    3rd shift guy, I can't tell you how many times I have had to deal with families or patients who demanded immediate attention during a code situation. Explaining to them what is going on just doesn't seem to cut any ice. I have had a family member jump all over me after I had been tied up with an admission who was circling the drain. Just recently I received a pt. back from a cardiac procedure in critical condition. One of my other pt's reported me for neglecting her, even after explaining to her what was going on. She had wanted crackers and coke and noone brought them. Our manager fell all over herself apologizing for the neglect.
    It's getting a bit absurd the "patient is the customer" and the demands. It's a bad situation sometimes of sicker patients, less staff, a sue-happy demanding selfish society. Something's gotta give.
  12. Visit  bravegirlamy profile page
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    It looks like Nurse managers & DONs would wake up! With this nursing shortage, a nurse can find a job ANYWHERE. If they want to keep the nurses that they do have, they should start "backing them" when it's needed.
  13. Visit  sanakruz profile page
    0
    No wonder I cant find any thing about "million nurse"- somebody clue me in, please


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