African Americans as nurses. - page 2

Hey everyone. I would just like to know if it is ok to work as a nurse as an african american and do many do it? Are there any drawbacks to this or will everything be alright? I thank you for all answers!... Read More

  1. 6
    A nurse is a nurse. race has nothing to do with it. it bugs me when people say "male nurse" or "black nurse" is there a difference????? no.

    go for your dreams and don't consider race as an issue
    Last edit by Moogie on Mar 10, '11 : Reason: Edited out unhelpful comment
    martinalpn, canoehead, GHGoonette, and 3 others like this.

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  2. 1
    As long as you have that Nurse after your name and are willing to work diligently it's OK. It's been OK everywhere I have worked and I hope it gets more OK when you graduate and join the best job in the whole world!!!
    SandraCVRN likes this.
  3. 11
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am not sure that I fully understand your question, but I will give it a shot. I am a black nurse, and yes, it is fully okay to work as an African-American nurse.

    Do many African-Americans do this job? Well, the answer to this question is dependent upon the region in which you live. Some areas are full of black nurses and other regions do not have any as the result of population trends.

    I would be telling a boldfaced lie if I said that there were no drawbacks and that 'everything is going to be alright' if you enter this profession. A small number of patients and families are bold enough to use the N-word and other racial slurs when referring to black staff members. A few patients will refuse caregivers based on racial/ethnic background, bluntly stating that "I don't want a black nurse." And, as always, you might even deal with demented elderly patients who will call you every name in the book because they have lost every ounce of tact.

    If you are a people-person, there are plenty of positive aspects to nursing. I'd much rather focus on the beneficial stuff, although I am not the type to put the rose-colored glasses on anyone's face when they ask a question that deserves an honest reply. Good luck to you!


    THE best response thus far. Mature and honest.
    ohioSICUrn, Katie5, Lil'mama, and 8 others like this.
  4. 2
    Eh, if anything, the nursing field could use more black nurses. Black nurses only constitute 4.2% of the Nursing field when blacks make up 13% of the population.

    I am black and I plan to be a nurse. If anyone has a problem with hiring or being treated by a black nurse, it is their lost and not mine. Besides, they'd have a law suits on their hands. And no one wants that...
    blackice82 and cna23 like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am not sure that I fully understand your question, but I will give it a shot. I am a black nurse, and yes, it is fully okay to work as an African-American nurse.

    Do many African-Americans do this job? Well, the answer to this question is dependent upon the region in which you live. Some areas are full of black nurses and other regions do not have any as the result of population trends.

    I would be telling a boldfaced lie if I said that there were no drawbacks and that 'everything is going to be alright' if you enter this profession. A small number of patients and families are bold enough to use the N-word and other racial slurs when referring to black staff members. A few patients will refuse caregivers based on racial/ethnic background, bluntly stating that "I don't want a black nurse." And, as always, you might even deal with demented elderly patients who will call you every name in the book because they have lost every ounce of tact.

    If you are a people-person, there are plenty of positive aspects to nursing. I'd much rather focus on the beneficial stuff, although I am not the type to put the rose-colored glasses on anyone's face when they ask a question that deserves an honest reply. Good luck to you!

    Well said .
    I think this poster is correct when a patient may ask to "not be with a black nurse"--you will get requests like this all the time even if you are not african american.
    I'm caucasian and i've gotten requests for patients asking for a different nurse because "I look too young to be a nurse" I'm 22 years old...i look maybe 17 or 18. It's not that i act 17 or dress like im 17, its just how i look. At first i was a little shocked at that request and a little hurt, but then i realized it's just how the patient is and i'll take it for what is was. We have a nurse who has an accent, from australia but has lived here since she was 16, and we had a patient request not to have her because she is "an australian nurse"

    So if you get requests like that, you really just can't take offense to them. Focus on the positive aspects and the patient's that you have made a difference to. That day i had a patient request not to have me...at the same time, i had a patient who absolutley adored me, and that made my day that much better. So if anything does get said (never by coworkers, occasionally maybe by patients) just stay focused on the positive, it outweighs the negative.
    martinalpn likes this.
  6. 2
    Ok, this guy's profile states he is in high school in Fort Lauderdale so we all know he didn't grow up under a rock.

    I am ASSUMING the poorly-worded question he is asking is, "Has the African-American community found the nursing profession to be very lucrative and welcoming? I am also African-American and am worried about the obstacles I might face due to my race."

    I am not African-American so I can't speak on it, but I will say the kindest, sweetest, smartest, best nurse I've ever had as a patient was black (not sure if her heritage was African-American, Haitian, from the Bahamas, other islands, Europe, the moon, I mean, really...). So yes, you will fare well in 2011 my friend.
    WindyhillBSN and MBARNBSN like this.
  7. 6
    "For those who are wondering where the question is coming from -- the OP is a 17 year old African American male who is considering nursing as a career (he started a thread yesterday about men in nursing)."

    A 17-year-old in 2011 America who believes that he must ask if it's OK for persons of a certain ethnic heritage to aspire to a nursing career?

    I don't know if I should be shocked, incredulous or outright frightened.

    On second thought, incredulous wins out. I don't believe that this is a serious question.
  8. 0
    i like what ROSER 13 said its 2011 not 1811 you put a smile on my face,you go for it and you will be one of a heck excellent nurse....
  9. 0
    Of course it's OK. There are a number of members here who are both African American and male - there is a Male Nurse forum and a Male Student Nurse forum where you might be able to get some good solid advice and experience.
  10. 6
    The poor guy probably feels intimidated!!!! I know I would feel a bit intimidated if I was going into a field where 90% of the workforce was African American males. Good for him if he has the determination to do something that may be frightening
    Last edit by ~Transplant Nurse~ on Mar 9, '11 : Reason: grammer
    martinalpn, SandraCVRN, blackice82, and 3 others like this.


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