Are we tyrants? - page 4

The other night, our RT was orienting a new guy to help cover NICU. He was taking him from bed to bed, showing him around and explaining things. I heard one of the nurses on that side of the room... Read More

  1. by   Bortaz, RN
    Quote from SoldierNurse22

    May I get you your crown, Bortaz?
    Sure, with a splash of diet Coke and a few cubes of ice.
  2. by   Glycerine82
    I would say when it comes to babies there is no such thing as being a tyrant. You are advocating for them and are pretty much their protector while they are in your care. I totally think you're awesome!
  3. by   ArgentumRN
    SaoirseRN: You missed the point and the sarcasm that went with it. The basic point is that being territorial does not help anyone... we are suppose to care for these patients as a team and that we dont own these patients... do you see it now? what is the "protective" nurse going to do on his/her day off? you see?

    just dont forget who is the nurse and who is the family. The "territorial" attitude screams unhealthy behaviour......

    The initial post seemed more like the nurse did not like that particular RT at a personal level perhaps not sure...and the RN's way was the only way..... that was the point. Again that is an unhealthy behaviour. It does not matter how much you choose to ignore it or look at it is very unprofesional.
    Last edit by ArgentumRN on Sep 17, '13
  4. by   lub dub
    Quote from Glycerine82
    I would say when it comes to babies there is no such thing as being a tyrant.
    There's no such thing as being a tyrant? Blanket statements like that concern me. Working in a NICU (or any unit, for that matter) does not give anyone the right to act in an unprofessional manner. Just remember this: whatever marvelous acts of nursing you have done during your shift can be completely undone by the next shift, or on your next day off. Be humble, and recognize that fact that you are a cog in the wheel of patient care.
  5. by   NicuGal
    Sure I act like a tryannt at times....my little friends can't speak for themselves and if someone is going to do something that could potentially harm my kid then yea, I will say something. Do it again, I will not be so nice. Especially about normal saline down a tube...not cool. Increase your VAP rates, give the kid a bug that is colonized in the tube....not okay.

    And if I am ever a patient in an ICU I hope Inhave a mean nurse to stick up for me!
  6. by   HyperSaurus, RN
    I think I understand the territorial-ness better now thanks to this thread. WHen I was a student interning in NICU, it really put me off, but this make a lot of sense. (I was going to look at an alarm to let the baby's nurse know, she saw me approaching and whisper-roared, "Get away from my baby!")
    Last edit by HyperSaurus, RN on Sep 17, '13 : Reason: Clarification
  7. by   ak2190
    I'm in the middle on this one. On one hand nurses should be assertive and prevent anyone from doing harm to the patient. However, you aren't doing your profession any favors by acting like you are the only one who is there for the patient or by embarrassing the RT in front of other staff. That could and should be handled in a professional manner. Being on top of things or being assertive does not give you the license to act like you own the patient. It only causes teamwork to break down among the staff and gives nursing an unprofessional reputation.
  8. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from Glycerine82
    I would say when it comes to babies there is no such thing as being a tyrant. You are advocating for them and are pretty much their protector while they are in your care. I totally think you're awesome!
    This

    I'm on team tyrant...too many risks.


    Advocating is NEVER pretty, rosy, or like a sappy classic movie. Sometimes during the advicoting process, too many "reeducations" to a team member, to me equates they don't respect the patient; it ultimately MY responsibility to intervene and make sure that MY patient is not further compromised...adult IS different than Peds...or any one fragile needs to be properly cared for WITHOUT preventable complications....what's MORE unprofessional, IMHO, are the "automatons" (LOVE this, Bortaz, btw! )that go roughshod over ANY patient.

    Oh, guess I'm unprofessional...I've had nickname for each of MY patients...
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Sep 17, '13
  9. by   SaoirseRN
    Quote from ArgentumRN
    SaoirseRN: You missed the point and the sarcasm that went with it. The basic point is that being territorial does not help anyone... we are suppose to care for these patients as a team and that we dont own these patients... do you see it now? what is the "protective" nurse going to do on his/her day off? you see?

    just dont forget who is the nurse and who is the family. The "territorial" attitude screams unhealthy behaviour......

    The initial post seemed more like the nurse did not like that particular RT at a personal level perhaps not sure...and the RN's way was the only way..... that was the point. Again that is an unhealthy behaviour. It does not matter how much you choose to ignore it or look at it is very unprofesional.
    I disagree. I think you have missed the point and are looking at this the wrong way.
  10. by   Amnesty
    Quote from ArgentumRN
    what is the "protective" nurse going to do on his/her day off? you see?
    Just because you can't always ensure that your patient is getting the best care (because you can't always be there) doesn't mean you should allow others to give sub-standard care while it's your shift. Ultimately, NICU nurses have very vulnerable patients who most other people in the hospital haven't the foggiest idea how to take care of and any small mistake could end up with that nurse packing the baby into the cooler downstairs. Not only do these nurses take such heavy protective measures out of a bond with their patients, but they SHOULD do it because it's their professional duty.

    Quote from ArgentumRN
    just dont forget who is the nurse and who is the family. The "territorial" attitude screams unhealthy behaviour......

    The initial post seemed more like the nurse did not like that particular RT at a personal level perhaps not sure...and the RN's way was the only way..... that was the point. Again that is an unhealthy behaviour. It does not matter how much you choose to ignore it or look at it is very unprofesional.
    You keep accusing these people of trying to claim unhealthy ownership of these babies they watch over and I don't think you understand that this has absolutely nothing to do with that. If you read the thread, you know that they are perfectly willing to allow other people to care for the infants when those other people have been properly trained. The RT the OP has a problem with? He's been addressed personally as well as by his management. It's been handled professionally and yet he still doesn't comply with this basic rule. You are the one continually blinding yourself to the reality that in cases like this, untrained outsiders, no matter how well educated in general or well-meaning they may be, cannot and do not always know how to handle a specialized patient population.

    These babies need protection from all the people who don't know how to handle them, and I'm pretty glad there are tough watchdog nurses to make sure they get that protection when they are at their most vulnerable and have no way to stand up for themselves.
  11. by   Esme12
    No one is saying that the nurse who is protective of her patients is participating in unprofessional behavior. No one said they exclude the family (who should NOT be touching ANYTHING)...but if at any point the family is causing instability to the patient they will be asked to leave. My job, at least while I am at the bedside, is to protect that patient and if I make a few people offended in that process then so be it.

    Bortaz is a long term member here at AN and an excellent NICU nurse. These fragile micro premies need intense scrutiny and care at all times. If that means restricting certain personnel from the room then so be it. I had made my own changes, drawn my own labs, done my own ABG's because I knew the tech covering wasn't the brightest bulb in the bunch.....it makes my night less stressful.

    All ICU nurses like things "just so" in their rooms and they want it their way when they are in charge of that patient. Physicians want these nurses to care for their patients because they know they will receive top notch care and some semblance of stability for tht shift. I have had surgeons call me at home when they have a particularly unstable patient with certain equipment because they don't want screw ups of a barrage of phone calls all night long. I always wold bring another nurse with me (in the days they allowed that sort of thing) to train and teach the tricks of the trade. If that makes me a tyrant...then I am proud to be a tyrant.

    The critical nature of these patients makes ICU nurses be compulsive about their care....in that compulsiveness is organization and in that organization is safety for the patient. I am perfectly capable, as are most ICU nurses, to turn it off when we leave so that we can come back tomorrow and do it again.

    I think this kind of nurse, the one who controls her environment in chaos, is what makes a good critical care nurse. Unfortunately one of my flaws is that I expect those around me to adhere to the same standards...fortunately I have worked in environments where we all felt the same way.

    We each have our own opinions and I respect others opinions....even when I disagree.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Sep 17, '13
  12. by   wooh
    How does "my baby" differ from "my patient"? I've heard we should call our patients clients, but can we no longer express possession either? Bortaz, from now on, you must refer to your mini-gerbils as "the client receiving care from me on this shift."
  13. by   lub dub
    Quote from Esme12
    No one is saying that the nurse who is protective of her patients is participating in unprofessional behavior.
    When did being a tyrant become considered to be professional behavior?

    Also, shouldn't it be "...the nurse who is protective of his or her patients..."?

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