NYC MTA Strike

  1. How is everyone coping with the NYC MTA Strike? How did you manage to get to work today? Let the world know how NYC Nurses are feeling!

    :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire

    On my behalf I didn't go to work today. With no Subways or buses running it was extremely hard getting to work. Walking/bicycling/rollarblading from the Bronx to Lower Manhattan isn't doable especially with the temperature in the 20's. Besides it's difficult finding a cab or finding complete strangers to carpool with. :angryfire :imbar :uhoh21:

    Please share your stories of Day 1 (MTA Strike)

    Ari RN
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  2. 36 Comments

  3. by   BunnyRN
    I hate it, I had a FINAL today, and I am so UPSET!!! They postponed the EXAM, now I have to take the exam at a later date. Maybe, I should be happy, I have more time to study, but then again I don't know if I want to spend my holidays thinking about my Final exam.
  4. by   loricatus
    Does anyone know of any carpools, commuter services, etc going from Astoria to NY Presbyterian-Cornell MC for the 7 AM shift? If so, please PM or email me. Any advise for someone without a car or bike would be very much appreciated .
    :icon_cry:
  5. by   LadyT618
    Quote from |LORICATUS|
    Does anyone know of any carpools, commuter services, etc going from Astoria to NY Presbyterian-Cornell MC for the 7 AM shift? If so, please PM or email me. Any advise for someone without a car or bike would be very much appreciated .
    :icon_cry:
    http://www.nyc.gov/html/transitinfo/...12120_0600.pdf
    You could check this site/map out. I noticed there is a car pooling area in Astoria Park. I don't know if that's near you or not. You can certainly try. I'm from Brooklyn myself, but work in Long Island, but hoping to get a new job in the city, despite the strike.

    Good Luck
    Last edit by LadyT618 on Dec 21, '05
  6. by   loricatus
    [FONT="Book Antiqua"]Thank You-you're an Angel :angel2:
  7. by   Jessy_RN
    I can see why you are mad, but can also see the transit people's side. They have been disrespected and treated not so well. At least they are doing something about it and trying to get their point across. This is what saving a dollar caused. I hope they come to an agreement soon for everyones sake and peace of mind. Bottom line is that you can't blame them. You would probably do the same in your profession.

    Good luck and enjoy your holiday.
  8. by   loricatus
    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    I can see why you are mad, but can also see the transit people's side. They have been disrespected and treated not so well. At least they are doing something about it and trying to get their point across. This is what saving a dollar caused. I hope they come to an agreement soon for everyones sake and peace of mind. Bottom line is that you can't blame them. You would probably do the same in your profession.

    Good luck and enjoy your holiday.
    I think the anger is more directed at the city's corporate approach to a necessary public service "saving a dollar" and it's just a frustration directed at the strikers because of the inconvience. My father was a retired MTA worker & I recall him working his butt off for pay that could barely support our family & a pension that that payed less than SS. From what I'm hearing/reading, things haven't changed much. If the mayor is stating that the city is losing 400 million dollars a day because of the strike, doesn't that prove the point of the value that should be placed on the MTA workers; &, shouldn't they be compensated according to their value/contribution to the economy of the city? What a radical idea, pay based on contributory value !
  9. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from |LORICATUS|
    I think the anger is more directed at the city's corporate approach to a necessary public service "saving a dollar" and it's just a frustration directed at the strikers because of the inconvience. My father was a retired MTA worker & I recall him working his butt off for pay that could barely support our family & a pension that that payed less than SS. From what I'm hearing/reading, things haven't changed much. If the mayor is stating that the city is losing 400 million dollars a day because of the strike, doesn't that prove the point of the value that should be placed on the MTA workers; &, shouldn't they be compensated according to their value/contribution to the economy of the city? What a radical idea, pay based on contributory value !
    Absolutely! Now for sure, everyone will value their hardwork and importance. It's just such a shame that things have to get to the extreme.
  10. by   BunnyRN
    Quote from |LORICATUS|
    I think the anger is more directed at the city's corporate approach to a necessary public service "saving a dollar" and it's just a frustration directed at the strikers because of the inconvience. My father was a retired MTA worker & I recall him working his butt off for pay that could barely support our family & a pension that that payed less than SS. From what I'm hearing/reading, things haven't changed much. If the mayor is stating that the city is losing 400 million dollars a day because of the strike, doesn't that prove the point of the value that should be placed on the MTA workers; &, shouldn't they be compensated according to their value/contribution to the economy of the city? What a radical idea, pay based on contributory value !
    I, so agree with you. This transportation system is not for the PEOPLE. I can't believe that they would rather see the city lose so much $$$, than give those workers an increase. On NY1, I heard that the union TWU would be fined $1,000,000.00 for each STRIKE DAY. Are they kidding me???:angryfire The rich keeps getting richer, and the poor --> poorer!!!
  11. by   lindarn
    I no longer live in NYC. I left in 1979 and moved to California, and now live in Spokane, WA. We have a poor public transportation system here, as in most areas of the country.

    To put this strike in perspective, my Dad worked for the Post Office when the Post Office was the lowest paid of the Federal Workers. In March of 1970, the Postal Office workers were fed up with the poor pay and disrespect from the Government, took the big plunge, and went on strike. That right folks. The ENTIRE US POST OFFICE, FROM COAST TO COAST, WENT ON STRIKE IN MARCH ON 1970. They brought this country to its knees in THREE days. They got what they wanted, and they never stuck again.

    Just think what nurses could accomplish if they finally got together and did the same thing. Just food for thought. Oh I forgot, the Martyr Marys of nursing woud not allow that,would they? Its better that nurses remain at he bottom of the food chain, with HS drop out wages and benefits, and that "respect" is never felt to be needed in how nurses are treated. It is expected that we will take all abuse with a smile because, "customer satisfaction" is more important than us. JMHO.

    Anyway, my thoughts are with you in this strike. I will watch it on my TV, and renew my vow to never again live in NY.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, WA
  12. by   LadyT618
    Quote from |LORICATUS|
    [FONT="Book Antiqua"]Thank You-you're an Angel :angel2:

    No problem. Sent a PM. Good Luck!!!
  13. by   LadyT618
    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    I can see why you are mad, but can also see the transit people's side. They have been disrespected and treated not so well. At least they are doing something about it and trying to get their point across. This is what saving a dollar caused. I hope they come to an agreement soon for everyones sake and peace of mind. Bottom line is that you can't blame them. You would probably do the same in your profession.

    Good luck and enjoy your holiday.

    Well said!!! Couldn't agree more!!
  14. by   hondurena
    First off let me commend all nurses who are making it to work during these difficult times as essential as you are New York City's patients need you!!!! I worked in the city hospitals when I lived there and we were short enough but dedicated professionals such as yourselves made it to work ---- despite 911, despite the snowstorms, remember the blackout summer 2003? I've walked across the Brooklyn bridge, Madison Ave bridge, 135th street bridge ---- Tappan Zee (maybe not)
    From what I see on the news nothing can paralyze NYC, not even the tranit authority-----it can only slow NYC down.
    As far as strikes go let us not forget--- the many strikes nurses have had to strike and walk out of hospitals demanding better pay, better patient ratios, I remember a particular strike where agencies were offering nurses $$$$$$ to cross hospital picket lines. With MTA who can replace them--- sure there are people who can probably drive a bus up and down 7th avenue but who knows how to open and close those subway doors:angryfire

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