NYC MTA Strike - page 3

How is everyone coping with the NYC MTA Strike? How did you manage to get to work today? Let the world know how NYC Nurses are feeling! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire... Read More

  1. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from wanna-be-nurse
    lol....funny loricactus....Rock its not about feeling sorry for anyone, its about injustice within the system. Why is it so difficult to approve a small raise to its workers, the workers who actually keep the MTA running so difficult when there is a surplus and why was it so easy to approve a 22% raise increase and benefit to its top MTA directors when they already were making a nice salary back in 2002-2003 while there was a defecit. Its not fair, I don't know why Toussaint didn't bring that up. It just reminds me of how the rich is so greedy and live to live off its workers and the poor and in the end takes all the credit for the work.

    Thank you
  2. by   wanna-be-nurse
    To: Grannynurse - The city as a whole did not have the surplus, the MTA did. The MTA (Metro. Transit System) pays its workers to run the system, not the city as a whole. Its workers are part of the union (Transit Workers Union) which provide its benefits and workers rights issues, etc. you know what I'm talking about. The city had nothing to do with this which is why Bloomberg had stepped out of this until they threaten to strike. Public workers are not allowed to strike and that is when Bloomberg and the judge came in threatening to fine the TWU. So, although MTA is part of the city's resources, its not the city we are dealing with but the MTA as a seperate entity. So I would have to disagree with your comment.

    To:Lorictus, Marie - Did you know that Pataki approved those raises back in 2002-2003 and was reluctant to do so for the TWU this time, seems like alot of beurocracy to me.
    And you know what makes me sad, that we as nurses are gonna have to deal with this too.
  3. by   wanna-be-nurse
    Ooops, sorry I meant Future RN Jess not Marie....don't know why I said Marie...lol:chuckle
  4. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from wanna-be-nurse
    To: Grannynurse - The city as a whole did not have the surplus, the MTA did. The MTA (Metro. Transit System) pays its workers to run the system, not the city as a whole. Its workers are part of the union (Transit Workers Union) which provide its benefits and workers rights issues, etc. you know what I'm talking about. The city had nothing to do with this which is why Bloomberg had stepped out of this until they threaten to strike. Public workers are not allowed to strike and that is when Bloomberg and the judge came in threatening to fine the TWU. So, although MTA is part of the city's resources, its not the city we are dealing with but the MTA as a seperate entity. So I would have to disagree with your comment.

    To:Lorictus, Marie - Did you know that Pataki approved those raises back in 2002-2003 and was reluctant to do so for the TWU this time, seems like alot of beurocracy to me.
    And you know what makes me sad, that we as nurses are gonna have to deal with this too.
    Unless the MTA, Bloomberg and Rudy did something to change their status, the MTA is still consider under the control of NYC. And Bloomberg did not 'step out' of it at all. And if he maintains that he did, prior to the strike, be thankful that he is out after this term (term limits remember).
    As members of 1199, who work for the H & HC, they too are not allowed to strike and, using your supposition, not workers employed by the city, I wish someone had told them that, when one of them hit me over the head with a placard, during a strike. Different divisions and departments may 'maintain' a separate identity but they are still considered part of the city government and more importantly part of the city budget. And as part of that budge and government, governed by the rules and laws covering any city entity. You are most likely to young to remember the hard times, of the 70s, of the MTA. And their lobbying to get a bigger piece of the budget pie. And their bag of surplus funds is not really that great when one considers the high cost of health care benefits and pensions, now coming due. And will continue to come due. And the MTA will face what the car industry and airline industry and their inability to meet their pension and health care needs. Unless they learn from others mistakes.

    I am not and never have been anti-union. I have suffered through an elven day transit strike, a five day R.N. strike, a three day LPN strike and a three day 1199 strike. I now live in a right to work state where employees are afraid to say boo to their employers. One of my nurses, during a recent hospitalization, was told the she would not receive double time and half, despite having worked her forty hours. This is in clear violation of federal laws regarding overtime pay. She went home after working three hours. I felt sorry that she was that afraid to stand up to her employer but I could understand her position.

    Grannynurse
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Rock
    Don't feel sorry for them. They make a very good salary. I never earned as much as them with a Master of Science degree.
    What's your definition of "a very good salary"? Factoring in the cost of living with that, of course.
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from lindarn
    Just think what nurses could accomplish if they finally got together and did the same thing. Just food for thought. Oh I forgot, the Martyr Marys of nursing woud not allow that,would they? Its better that nurses remain at he bottom of the food chain, with HS drop out wages and benefits, and that "respect" is never felt to be needed in how nurses are treated. It is expected that we will take all abuse with a smile because, "customer satisfaction" is more important than us. JMHO.

    (Sigh)

    Phrases "Martyr Marys" does not command any respect whatsoever. You describe the lack of respect, yet use such a phrase.

    Sorry about the derailment, people, but that line just struck a chord, as usual lol.
  7. by   wanna-be-nurse
    I do not disagree as MTA part of the city but if MTA has surplus, it belongs to MTA not the city as a whole, money can not be moved around simply as that. My disagreement is the wide gap between the MTA's top and fellow workers. You should read this article by Sewell Chan of the New York Times when he wrote regarding that 22% increase to top MTA officials while facing a defecit. That angers me so much because these people weren't asking for much and not at time of deficit. Yes other companies are facing health care and pension cuts but is that right in itself? Wouldn't you agree with me that everyone deserves a decent health care and pension? It seems that now in days its cooler to have an iPod than decent healthcare! It should be a right not a priveledge (sp?)[ I commend the TWU for standing up for their rights and hopefully will open others to do the same.
    As far as a placecard during the strike striking you, that is def. an individual case and not to blame the whole TWU but I am sorry to hear that that happened to you. Get me next time and I'll show them...lol. I do agree that back in the 70's, city was horrible, remember Hell's Kitchen, Harlem was a shooting range and 42nd St. was, well you get my gist. I'm 29 and I do not remember any of that but I have to say that the city has improved significantly and that is why its workers should be compensated appropriately. I feel sorry for your coworker. I can feel her pain cause she probably has a family to feed and afraid to speak up. That is so unfair it breaks my heart. I hope everyone can find the strenght to stand up, even a little, to injustices like these.
  8. by   lindarn
    And this is better than working with a union? I don't think so. I too, grew up in the NYC area, and my father worked for the Post Office. In 1970, the Post Office went on strike due to pauper wages, and benefits. The entire Post Office went on strike across the whole country, and brought this country to its knees. It lasted three days, before the Government gave in. It was a strike that was born of, as I said, pauper wages, disrespect, and frustration from years of being the "step chidren", of the federal employees. It was brought on by management, and the President, who refused to give decent wages to an important branch of the government. In other words, the government asked for it. The strike gave the Post Office workers respect, and credibility, because they stood up for themselves, and demanded what they knew they deserved. No one respects a woos. It has been not needed to repeat the same step.

    Compare that to the nursing profession, and the weak kneed, wishy washy, members, and the lousy pay, benefits, and disrespect that we endure due to "martyr marys" that seem to rule the profession. And have been the downfall of all of us.

    It takes alot of guts to stand up for yourself, and demand what you are worth. Caving in to management, to abusive policies, and dangerous staffing levels, only empowers, and encourages them to continue their conduct. There is nothing wrong with wanting more pay, and benefits. Low pay, just shows how little we are thought of, and how really scared they are of nursing finally flexling their muscle against the abuse that we endure on a daily basis.

    It sickens me when I read, on this listserve, when nurses are wrongfully terminated, etc, and the nurse involved does not take legal action against the hospital. Nurses have to practice "defensive nursing and employment", and make it a habit of making notes, copies of incident reports, writing letters to administration, Boards of Medicine and Nursing, JCAHO, sent registered mail with a return receipt, etc. You get the picture. It is ammunition against the campaign that they will do to discredit you. Unions are not the problem. Just MHO, and $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  9. by   wanna-be-nurse
    I totally agree with you....nurses should take the initiative and stand up for themselves and sometimes it means sacraficing yourself for a cause. I think it is why it is so difficult to do because alot of nurses might have their jobs taken away from them and that is a big sacrafice, especially when they have a family to feed. But I have to agree that no one respects a wuz and one MUST stand up for one's rights in the work place in order to get the respect that not only do they deserve but have earned.


    Quote from lindarn
    And this is better than working with a union? I don't think so. I too, grew up in the NYC area, and my father worked for the Post Office. In 1970, the Post Office went on strike due to pauper wages, and benefits. The entire Post Office went on strike across the whole country, and brought this country to its knees. It lasted three days, before the Government gave in. It was a strike that was born of, as I said, pauper wages, disrespect, and frustration from years of being the "step chidren", of the federal employees. It was brought on by management, and the President, who refused to give decent wages to an important branch of the government. In other words, the government asked for it. The strike gave the Post Office workers respect, and credibility, because they stood up for themselves, and demanded what they knew they deserved. No one respects a woos. It has been not needed to repeat the same step.

    Compare that to the nursing profession, and the weak kneed, wishy washy, members, and the lousy pay, benefits, and disrespect that we endure due to "martyr marys" that seem to rule the profession. And have been the downfall of all of us.

    It takes alot of guts to stand up for yourself, and demand what you are worth. Caving in to management, to abusive policies, and dangerous staffing levels, only empowers, and encourages them to continue their conduct. There is nothing wrong with wanting more pay, and benefits. Low pay, just shows how little we are thought of, and how really scared they are of nursing finally flexling their muscle against the abuse that we endure on a daily basis.

    It sickens me when I read, on this listserve, when nurses are wrongfully terminated, etc, and the nurse involved does not take legal action against the hospital. Nurses have to practice "defensive nursing and employment", and make it a habit of making notes, copies of incident reports, writing letters to administration, Boards of Medicine and Nursing, JCAHO, sent registered mail with a return receipt, etc. You get the picture. It is ammunition against the campaign that they will do to discredit you. Unions are not the problem. Just MHO, and $0.02.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  10. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from wanna-be-nurse
    I do not disagree as MTA part of the city but if MTA has surplus, it belongs to MTA not the city as a whole, money can not be moved around simply as that. My disagreement is the wide gap between the MTA's top and fellow workers. You should read this article by Sewell Chan of the New York Times when he wrote regarding that 22% increase to top MTA officials while facing a defecit. That angers me so much because these people weren't asking for much and not at time of deficit. Yes other companies are facing health care and pension cuts but is that right in itself? Wouldn't you agree with me that everyone deserves a decent health care and pension? It seems that now in days its cooler to have an iPod than decent healthcare! It should be a right not a priveledge (sp?)[ I commend the TWU for standing up for their rights and hopefully will open others to do the same.
    As far as a placecard during the strike striking you, that is def. an individual case and not to blame the whole TWU but I am sorry to hear that that happened to you. Get me next time and I'll show them...lol. I do agree that back in the 70's, city was horrible, remember Hell's Kitchen, Harlem was a shooting range and 42nd St. was, well you get my gist. I'm 29 and I do not remember any of that but I have to say that the city has improved significantly and that is why its workers should be compensated appropriately. I feel sorry for your coworker. I can feel her pain cause she probably has a family to feed and afraid to speak up. That is so unfair it breaks my heart. I hope everyone can find the strenght to stand up, even a little, to injustices like these.
    I'm afraid it is up to the union workers to decide the salaries of their leaders. And not us, members of the general public. And the hit on the head I suffered, as well as the general pushing and shoving, was because they thought I was a strike beaker, which I was not. I was an observer, from the NYSDOH, who was sent in to observe and determine that no patient suffered from lack of care. I held the power to shut Bellvue down and order all the remaining patients transfered. Fortunately, I didn't have to use my power and the strike was over in three days. And no patient suffered. The nurse I spoke of, was not a co-worker but one who was taking care of me. And her position is quite common, here in Florida, and many other right to work states. Fear of being black listed out weighs the unfairness of ones employer, And without a strong union, you are at the mercy of your employer. It is one of the main reasons I left bedside nursing, except for seasonal staff relief, and went to work as a case manager. That and my income greatly improved as did the respect from physicians.

    Grannynurse
  11. by   cammy429
    Hey I work at NYP cornell too. I know that the strike is over but The hospital's website (the infonet) had carpool info and a lot of people were volunteering to carpool.

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