Pornographic movies

  1. 0
    I'm wondering if anyone else has dealt with this and what the outcome was. We have a 59 year old quad (quad x 33 years) who likes to watch pornographic movies. Since he cannot put the movies on himself, employees have to assist if he's going to watch. Some staff do not mind this at all, but others are outraged that we would allow these movies in a hospital. I have set up a plan so that nobody who is uncomfortable with the movies has to go in to assist him, and a stop sign must be placed on the door whenever he is viewing to alert housekeeping, dietary, etc from walking in on this. The problem is that he is lewd and disrespectful toward the nurses anyway, and some of them feel that the pornography is contributing to his attitude. They are probably right, truth be known, but the bottom line is that he is an adult and what he is doing is not illegal. He has no family, so having a relative assist isn't an option. Any advice here?

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  2. 27 Comments...

  3. 0
    Wow!

    Maybe you can use the movies as a reward for "good" behavior. If he is lewd with the nurses, no porn movies that night. (And yes, I would probably want to limit the time of day these movies were being viewed out of consideration for other people.)

    I don't see not allowing it at all.
    Last edit by vashtee on Sep 1, '07
  4. 4
    I would ask if he would like a chaplain to visit him sometime just to talk, since he doesn't have family. I would not put in the movies for him...he IS an adult but so are the hired help he has been lewd to. This is an example of entitlement...I'm entitled to view what I want. My feeling is if it isn't on the hospital TV channel, then you are out of luck. This may sound harsh, but a hospital is a controlled environment, we don't allow everybody everything...the diabetic doesn't get an ice cream sundae delivered from staff because" he is an adult and made an informed decision"...the smoker doesn't get to smoke in a smoke-free hospital/campus.

    We use plastic utensils on the psych unit, no caffeine and no trash bags either, for safety of clients...and staff. Controlled environment.
    mommy2boysaz, FocusRN, Altra, and 1 other like this.
  5. 5
    When working LTC we had a 61 yr man with very severe Parkinson's. He too enjoyed watching porn movies. And like your staff, some had issues with putting it in the movies for him. (I personally didn't have an issue since all I was doing was putting the movie in for him and walking out the door. I never saw any of the movie)

    Our DON told us we didn't have to put in the movies if we had issues with it (there was always one person on the shifts who was willing to put it in for him). We, too, put up a big red STOP sign on it, so that all staff (housekeeping, dietary, nursing, recreation etc) knew the movie was on, if the person had a problem with seeing such a movie, they knew not to go in when that sign was up.

    He could watch it anytime he wanted, for any amount of time. His private room was his "home" and he was a consenting adult so we could not put any limits on the type of movies he watched, the amout of time he watched them, or what time of day/night he could view them. Our corporate lawyer informed the DON denying him his "rights" to watch the porn movies could land the facility in big trouble.

    I don't think the movies make your resident lewd and disrespectful to staff, he was most likely a rude, lewd and disrespectful person his whole life and it was probably compounded when he became a quad at the age of 26. (I can only imagine how nasty I'd probably get having to rely on someone to take care of my most basic of needs at that age..would probably change me into a very nasty and bitter woman)

    I think your ideas of the stop sign, and allowing your staff to choose if they want to put the movies in or not are good ones, and probably the only ones available.

    *I just realized this was LTC DON/ADON forum. I'm only a student and can only offer up my personal experiences to this subject. **
    Last edit by CT Pixie on Sep 1, '07
    BaByNuRsE07, catlvr, mercyteapot, and 2 others like this.
  6. 2
    A student you may be, but you are spot on when it comes to this topic. It sounds like you've had a lot of LTC experience.........you know your stuff!

    I don't have much to add, other than the fact that residents don't check their rights at the nursing-home doorstep. They are adults and should be treated as such--even if their choices aren't particularly attractive---as long as they don't affect other residents or staff. Whether we like it or not, residents have to be afforded appropriate opportunities (and privacy) to satisfy their sexual desires, just like any other need or want; to deny this man his porno movies could even be considered a form of abuse.

    After all, the LTC facility is his home, and behaviors like what Mrs. M has described don't really have much to do with what the law says. Yes, he needs to be discouraged from being lewd and crude with the staff, but treating him like a child by taking away a legal source of enjoyment is a violation of his rights. His care plan needs to include a behavior management agreement between him and the facility, and staff should be made aware of the care plan and how to report any unseemly behaviors on his part.

    It's good that there are a number of caregivers on the unit who are willing to put the movies in the DVD player for him and put them away when he's through. But even if they weren't, you just can't NOT provide this 'entertainment' for him, it is his right as a U.S. citizen over age 21 to view and possess pornography.

    I had to deal with this sort of thing as a resident-care manager on a "young-adult" ICF unit some years back; and even though I was rather revolted by some of what I saw there, I quickly learned there is no room for misinterpretation when it comes to resident rights.

    Good luck with this man, he certainly sounds like a handful.
    NRSKarenRN and michelle126 like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from psalm
    I would ask if he would like a chaplain to visit him sometime just to talk, since he doesn't have family. I would not put in the movies for him...he IS an adult but so are the hired help he has been lewd to. This is an example of entitlement...I'm entitled to view what I want. My feeling is if it isn't on the hospital TV channel, then you are out of luck. This may sound harsh, but a hospital is a controlled environment, we don't allow everybody everything...the diabetic doesn't get an ice cream sundae delivered from staff because" he is an adult and made an informed decision"...the smoker doesn't get to smoke in a smoke-free hospital/campus.

    We use plastic utensils on the psych unit, no caffeine and no trash bags either, for safety of clients...and staff. Controlled environment.
    I'm going to take a wild guess that you are not a Director in Long-Term Care. If a diabetic patient wants an ice cream, we educate, educate, educate - then give them their ice cream. Smoking is a different situation, because it puts others at risk.



    Thanks everyone, I appreciate the feedback. He is a very intelligent man, and usually pretty easy going. He knows his Civil Rights, and can quote chapter and verse to any person who questions him. He's actually fairly reasonable in that he readily accepts it when nobody is willing to put the movie on, and will even say "I've got a movie on" when people he doesn't know start to come through the door. My problem is more with my staff than with the resident. I am repulsed by pornography personally, but I can't deny the fact that it is legal and he has a right to view it in his home.
  8. 0
    Student here: Interesting thread. I understand the rationale behind allowing the movies to be screened: The patient has rights.

    But what about the rights of employees to be free from sexual harassment? Does the employer not have a legal obligation to warn the patient that his behavior toward employees is unacceptable? What recourse do nurses have against sexual harassment by a patient?

    It seems to me that there are two distinct issues here: screening the porn in the privacy of the patient's room and the harassment of employees. I don't see them as related.
  9. 0
    Quote from Freedom42
    Student here: Interesting thread. I understand the rationale behind allowing the movies to be screened: The patient has rights.

    But what about the rights of employees to be free from sexual harassment? Does the employer not have a legal obligation to warn the patient that his behavior toward employees is unacceptable? What recourse do nurses have against sexual harassment by a patient?

    It seems to me that there are two distinct issues here: screening the porn in the privacy of the patient's room and the harassment of employees. I don't see them as related.
    I was thinking along the same lines. Although the situation is OK now in that none of the employees have filed complaints etc., what happens when the next new employee is offended and decides to file a sexual harassment complaint because of being asked to put in the movie, or heard a bit of the movie outside the door etc.? Seems like you're between a rock and a hard place.
  10. 0
    Quote from danh3190
    I was thinking along the same lines. Although the situation is OK now in that none of the employees have filed complaints etc., what happens when the next new employee is offended and decides to file a sexual harassment complaint because of being asked to put in the movie, or heard a bit of the movie outside the door etc.? Seems like you're between a rock and a hard place.
    Sexual harassment laws don't protect employees from patients, they protect employees from other employees/authority figures. According to our attorney, the fact that I have informed them that they do not have to put the movie on for him will cover us. There is potential for all of us to overhear things that we don't want to hear, usually it's conversations between family members of the residents! My biggest challenge is trying to get the staff to understand that they aren't responsible for his soul, and moral judgments are just inappropriate in this setting.
  11. 0
    My former employer (at an industrial research lab) seemed to feel that the laws protected employees from sexual harassment by customers and not just other employees. I don't know if that was true or if they were just being paranoid. I was just viewing the patient as a customer in this situation. Of course it's possible that the laws are different in healthcare.


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