Why do so many people insist that LPN'S AREN'T REAL NURSES!!?? - page 6

I mean, the title does have "Nurse" in it.So why are so many people insisting that LPN's arent real nurses? When I go to the hospital, I see these people giving medication , care, comfort and other... Read More

  1. by   VickyRN
    In the small rural community hospital in which I work part-time (job #2), LPN's do just about the same patient care as the RN's with a few exceptions (pushes and blood drawns from central lines). The LPN's are my colleagues. Their patient care and assessment skills are excellent and I would entrust the care of my family members to them any day of the week. I would also like to add that I have learned much from them (and so have my students on rotation).
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from ckben
    I think that kind of attitude is really sad. I have a bachelor's degree in nursing, and from my point of view, the ONLY thing that determines whether you are a good nurse or not is the kind of person you are. Not your education or your license, just your personality.

    I say this because several of the people I graduated with, who are now working RNs, I wouldn't trust with my own or my family's lives were we their patients. At the same time, there are several LVNs (that's what we call them here) who have the experience, knowledge, and determination that makes them some of the better nurses I've seen.

    I'm not sure what other places are like, but here LVNs get paid about half of an RN's pay for doing the same extremely tough, stressful job, except for admission assessments and care plans. Just doesn't seem right.
    I think I understand what you mean because many nursing assistants and medical student aids provide excellent patient care.
    It is incorrect though to claim it is the personality.
    In most states it is a crime to represent yourself or another as a nurse who is not licensed as an LPN, LVN, or RN.

    Some of the finest nurses I know are LVNs.
  3. by   ckben
    Quote from spacenurse
    I think I understand what you mean because many nursing assistants and medical student aids provide excellent patient care.
    It is incorrect though to claim it is the personality.
    In most states it is a crime to represent yourself or another as a nurse who is not licensed as an LPN, LVN, or RN.

    Some of the finest nurses I know are LVNs.
    I think you misunderstood. I didn't mean in the sense of misrepresentation. I meant that, on my floor, LVNs do the EXACT same job as RNs except for the occasional paperwork. That means they can hang blood, do central line care, push any and all meds, etc.

    What I meant is that being an RN doesn't make you better at assessments. It doesn't mean you check on your patients more often, or that your sterile technique is better. It doesn't mean you check the five rights more often than others. It doesn't mean that you're more knowledgeable. In my experience, if you are the type of person who takes pride in your work, if you are committed to providing the best care for your patient (instead of making sure you get your coffee/smoke breaks as often as you like), if you have the drive to look up information when you find gaps in your knowledge base instead of saying "huh" and moving on, then you are a better nurse. And I have seen, in my personal experience, that this comes down to what type of person you are, regardless of what particular license you happen to hold. RNs start out with an advantage, sure. You have an extra year's worth of knowledge under your belt. But, over time, that extra schooling doesn't account for as much as how much the nurse has done since graduation to grow within the profession.

    I suppose in places where LPNs and LVNs can't do some of these things that they can where I live that gap probably seems much wider. But from where I'm standing, there is a WORLD of difference between the nurse aide and the nurse tech, and a WORLD of difference between the nurse tech and the nurse. But the difference between LVNs and RNs? At least in my workplace, very minimal.
  4. by   LeahJet
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I wondered when you would come and put in your opinion.
    Sigh.

    If nothing else, she's predictable.

  5. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Why do so many people insist that LPNs aren't nurses? Because the ANA said so.

    It's 1965 “Educational preparation for nurse practitioners and assistants to nurses: a position paper,” stated that vocational education should be for the training of "assistants to nurses".

    That position paper advocated the complete elimination of diploma programs and the removal of the title, nurse, from vocational programs.

    And, it is widely taught in nursing schools. I myself was told, in 1991, that "The role of LPN/LVN as nurses would be eliminated within ten years."

    So, thank the ANA and the Ivory Tower for this jewel of propaganda.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  6. by   Brita01
    Quote from lindarn
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

  7. by   hogan4736
    Quote from TazziRN
    I face a similar attitude about "just being an ADN"....I am always being asked why I don't go after my BSN. Because I don't want it! It would get me absolutely nothing that I don't already have...

    Off topic, but one exception...in some states you can be a clinical instructor w/ a BSN...That is the only reason I am glad to have my BSN...Otherwise the same to me...(I belive ADNs should be allowed to be clinical instructors)
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally Posted by ckben
    I think that kind of attitude is really sad. I have a bachelor's degree in nursing, and from my point of view, the ONLY thing that determines whether you are a good nurse or not is the kind of person you are. Not your education or your license, just your personality.
    I must apologize. I misread this to mean that a caregiver could be a good nurse without a license to practice nursing.

    Now I see you meant LVN/LPN/RN .

    Absolutely all nurses!
  9. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Why do so many people insist that LPNs aren't nurses? Because the ANA said so.

    It's 1965 "Educational preparation for nurse practitioners and assistants to nurses: a position paper," stated that vocational education should be for the training of "assistants to nurses".

    That position paper advocated the complete elimination of diploma programs and the removal of the title, nurse, from vocational programs.

    And, it is widely taught in nursing schools. I myself was told, in 1991, that "The role of LPN/LVN as nurses would be eliminated within ten years."

    So, thank the ANA and the Ivory Tower for this jewel of propaganda.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Unfortunately the same attitutes and divisions are prevalent within Canada's nursing organizations when it comes to LPNs/RPNs.
  10. by   moodychick
    Hi,

    I've been an LPN for 34 years; and now, at the ripe age of 56, I'm attempting to get my RN. I can tell you that for all of the 34 years of nursing at the LPN level, I always ran into someone who didn't think an LPN was a nurse. These people ran the gamut of current nurse manager to an Na or two. I have to say I've been in informal discussions with a nurse educator and several RN's only to have the nurse educator turn her back to me and address the others as if I didn't exist. It's been a long 34 years; but, hopefully, when I get my RN. I won't act the same way. I will appreciate any LPN's working with me!
  11. by   mamason
    I worked with an LPN on a cardiac floor. She pretty much pulled the same weight as the RN's did. She was a good nurse. Some of the other RN's would make snide remarks about her not being a RN. I thought it was horrible. THey thought that since she was a LPN, then she should get a heavier pt load than the RN. Didn't make much sense to me but, I was a new grad at the time. The new manager, who was a previous LPN, got rid of her on some ridiculous charge of violating an employee's privacy. It was BS and everyone knew it was. It was a shame. I recently ran into her at another facillity. She actually took care of my mother after a knee replacement. When I realized that she was in charge of my mother's care, I knew that my mom was going to be in good hands. And my mother recovered nicely from her surgery. The LPN stated that she is happy now in her new position and her company treats her well.
    So, yes, I think that LPN'S are REAL nurses.:wink2:
  12. by   walkiez
    Would the LPN'S out there consider a 'Dental Nurse' a real nurse? What defines a real nurse. It's often hierarchial; an RN of 3-4years training to obtain a degree doesn't want to be compaired with someone who attended school for <1.5 years. People want their hard work recognised.

    Not many patients even know the difference between an LPN and RN. To them, a nurse is a nurse.
  13. by   txspadequeenRN
    Im not sure what to think about this post ....If the dental nurse is a LVN or RN then yes, but an assistant then no. You cant call yourself a nurse if your not one legally. Thats kinda common sense. Everyone works hard in their nursing program whether it be 1.5 yrs or 3-4 years.. PLEASE lets dont get started on comparing the LVN and RN profession ...I dont think I have the strength




    Quote from walkiez
    Would the LPN'S out there consider a 'Dental Nurse' a real nurse? What defines a real nurse. It's often hierarchial; an RN of 3-4years training to obtain a degree doesn't want to be compaired with someone who attended school for <1.5 years. People want their hard work recognised.

    Not many patients even know the difference between an LPN and RN. To them, a nurse is a nurse.

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