Question re Sliding Scale Insulin

  1. Mr. Brown is on sliding scale insulin as well as NPH insulin. His morning dose of NPH is 60 units. At 1130 he was given 10 units of Toronto insulin. You have just been informed by the CNA that Mr. Brown did not eat any of his lunch today and is looking pretty lethargic. You enter Mr. Brown's room to find him slumped over in bed and unresponsive. What should you do?

    a) call a code blue
    b) check for breathing and a pulse
    c) check his blood sugar
    d) all of the above
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    Which choice are you favoring?
  4. by   LPN_of_BC
    I have never had this experience before as LPN but for me I will check first for breathing and pulse then his blood sugar and if the breathing/pulse is so weak and BS is lower the limit I will notify the charge RN and she/he will decide for a code blue. In our unit RN will call for a code blue. This question is part of the course for LPN who will start sliding scale insulin admin for the very first time. I need your opinion please which is the best answer......thanks.
  5. by   ninfanp
    Quote from jaycee
    I have never had this experience before as LPN but for me I will check first for breathing and pulse then his blood sugar and if the breathing/pulse is so weak and BS is lower the limit I will notify the charge RN and she/he will decide for a code blue. In our unit RN will call for a code blue. This question is part of the course for LPN who will start sliding scale insulin admin for the very first time. I need your opinion please which is the best answer......thanks.


    Of course you should check patient's breathing & pulse as a first response
    but why Code Blue???Patient went Hypogly Dextrose 50%
    fast drip as emergency response the Rn/nurse supervisor
    can manage this case.Check BS,Calling for Code blue is not the priority
  6. by   LPN_of_BC
    Thanks ninfanp. That's the reason why I'm a little bit confuse. So the right answer should be (b) check for breathing and a pulse?
  7. by   DDRN4me
    YOu should Always check for breathing and a pulse first ( think ABC..Airway Breathing Circulation.
  8. by   ninfanp
    Exactly,thats the only choice referring to ABC
  9. by   LPN_of_BC
    Quote from DDRN4me
    YOu should Always check for breathing and a pulse first ( think ABC..Airway Breathing Circulation.
    THANK YOU !!!
  10. by   LPN_of_BC
    Quote from ninfanp
    Exactly,thats the only choice referring to ABC
    THANK YOU !!!
  11. by   pagandeva2000
    Yeah, I would have checked respiration and pulses, immediately obtained a fingerstick, and then called a code. ABC...the way to be. You need to have this information when you call the RN, supervisor, physician or code, anyway.
  12. by   scallywags
    I remember reading in stratagies that it is always patient before equipment, so I would check the patient first.
  13. by   smk1
    Quote from jaycee
    Mr. Brown is on sliding scale insulin as well as NPH insulin. His morning dose of NPH is 60 units. At 1130 he was given 10 units of Toronto insulin. You have just been informed by the CNA that Mr. Brown did not eat any of his lunch today and is looking pretty lethargic. You enter Mr. Brown's room to find him slumped over in bed and unresponsive. What should you do?

    a) call a code blue
    b) check for breathing and a pulse
    c) check his blood sugar
    d) all of the above
    The answer is "B". If someone is unresponsive you go into CPR mode and check the ABC's. You will also check the blood sugar, but if CPR is needed you can't wait to get that started. You will only call a code blue if there isn't a pulse or he is not breathing etc... So based on what you find you may not need to call a code so the answer shouldn't be all of the above.
  14. by   armymom5
    d in coma

close