ever worked for flu shot clinic???

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    i am interested in doing this , i have an opportunity to do so, but would like to know if anyone has done this, any pros and/or cons?

    thanks
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Hi, I did flu shots as volunteer work for my RN program at the Veterans Hospital and I loved it! It was fun. People line up, ask em if they have allergies or previous reactions, glove up and draw the vaccine, and shoot away.... did that to over 100 veterans. It was such a great experience that I signed up for Occuvax and the Mollens Clinic this season. Don't know what to expect since I've never actually been employed at a flu clinic and was told I might be alone a couple of days and if people call in sick. I think I'll be fine as long as I have an epi pen if someone has an anaphylactic reaction. Thats the only thing I care about, but then again hopefully its not their first flu shot or have never ate eggs cause then they wouldn't know if they were allergic! yikes! You'll have fun!
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    i signed up for occuvax also, thats the only one's i've seen in my area so far.
    just wondering how many hours are actually available doing this???
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    I would like to know also. I just applied for two of them. I don't need full-time as I have family, school, and dance. Just 16 hours is enough for me.
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    Hi, I also volunteered. After my last day of school, about 4 grads, went with one of our clinical instructors and gave the flu shots. When the H1N1 was at it's peak. It was alot of fun. You learn to give shots without being afraid. The geriatric population that seem to not have any muscle and you have to give IM, or the little 6 year old that the mom and dad have to hold down as he is screaming "bloody murder!!" Then right after the shot says, "it didn't hurt," with a smile. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did. Good luck!!
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    Flu clinics are usually fun. Some precautions are simply to remember to check how many supplies you have ahead of time, and especially make sure that you have epinepherine for emergencies. I have not seen one since I did them, but most agencies will tell you not to even start giving any flu shots if the epi isn't there. There will be hell to pay IF something happens, that there is a policy that states the nurses should have epi, but you don't.

    When the lines are long, I sometimes made a brief announcement saying that anyone who is allergic to eggs must step to the side to speak to the nurse before vaccination. I'd take them to the side and refer them to their private physician for further assessment. Met interesting people, made easy money.
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    Have done this for three different companies on four occasions. Biggest problem is lack of communication and disorganization when dealing with the employer. The clinic itself is usually not bad as long as you have some help with crowd control if you need it.
    dance4life likes this.
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    who do you contact to get in on the clinics?
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    Look in the employment websites for your area, other normal avenues for employment. Do an internet search for "flu clinics", and look on the website for employment opportunities. Some of the companies doing flu shot clinics are: Mollen Immunization Clinics, Maxim Healthcare, Vaxcare, Sutter Health, to name a few. Look at your local VNA offices and your local hospitals. Lots of employers do their own flu shot clinics.


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