Do LPNs Get the Respect They Deserve? | allnurses

Do LPNs Get the Respect They Deserve?

  1. 0 ok, well, i am a pre-nursing student. i am waiting to see if i get accepted to an lpn program right now. i later plan on finishing up and getting my degree after i have worked as an lpn for awhile. since i have made this decision i have heard nothing but horror stories about how lpns are treated by rns. <--i am clueless as to what that's all about. i have also heard it's next to impossible to find work as an lpn. i was told by an rn that there is a huge difference between an rn and an lpn....she said there are a substanitial amount of things that an lvn could not do in a hospital, therefore there was no need for them. hmmm. can someone clear this up for me? i might be a little niave, but i thought there was not too much of a difference besides pay, and a few other reponsibilities. do you feel that lpns get shafted? since i don't have any nurses in my family to talk to, i would very much appreciate any feedback you can give me. thank you in advance.
  2. 59 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  DeiDei profile page
    0
    hello truly blessed,

    this is a topic that could go on forever based upon experiences from both sides. i'll attempt to answer your question in part as i'm an lpn working toward my bsn. at any rate, some time ago a few hospitals in my area didn't hire lpn's, not to say there wasn't a need, but they preferred an all rn staff. that soon changed when they felt the crunch several years ago from the nursing shortage that wasn't nearly as bad then as it is now. today they are happy to have lpn's fill in some of the gap. we can do many things an rn can do, but they too can do things that we cannot. while we are allowed to start iv's we cannot hang any blood products or cancer products, we can place foley catheters, take verbal orders, do admissions and assessments, write care plans, supervise nurses aides, run assisted living departments, work in the er, etc, etc, etc. you just have to know what is allowed within your scope. of course there is more, but i'm a little pressed for time. i'll try and get back to you again. good luck with whatever you decide to do.



    Quote from truly_blessed
    ok, well, i am a pre-nursing student. i am waiting to see if i get accepted to an lpn program right now. i later plan on finishing up and getting my degree after i have worked as an lpn for awhile. since i have made this decision i have heard nothing but horror stories about how lpns are treated by rns. <--i am clueless as to what that's all about. i have also heard it's next to impossible to find work as an lpn. i was told by an rn that there is a huge difference between an rn and an lpn....she said there are a substanitial amount of things that an lvn could not do in a hospital, therefore there was no need for them. hmmm. can someone clear this up for me? i might be a little niave, but i thought there was not too much of a difference besides pay, and a few other reponsibilities. do you feel that lpns get shafted? since i don't have any nurses in my family to talk to, i would very much appreciate any feedback you can give me. thank you in advance.
  4. Visit  DeiDei profile page
    0
    I forgot to mention, not only is there an abundance of work for LPN's in my state, but I must add that some of those jobs pay quite well and some are average pay. The RN who said those things to you is mislead or misguided or both. Here's a piece of advice....I usually tell anyone interested in an LPN program to first consider going to a 2 year (ADN) program.....at least this way you'll be halfway to your BSN and if you don't pass your boards for THR associate RN I think you can take a test to get your LPN license.....at least that's what I heard. Good Luck!!!



    Quote from DeiDei
    Hello Truly Blessed,

    This is a topic that could go on forever based upon experiences from both sides. I'll attempt to answer your question in part as I'm an LPN working toward my BSN. At any rate, some time ago a few hospitals in my area didn't hire LPN's, not to say there wasn't a need, but they preferred an all RN staff. That soon changed when they felt the crunch several years ago from the nursing shortage that wasn't nearly as bad then as it is now. Today they are happy to have LPN's fill in some of the gap. We can do many things an RN can do, but they too can do things that we cannot. While we are allowed to start IV's we cannot hang any blood products or cancer products, we can place foley catheters, take verbal orders, do admissions and assessments, write care plans, supervise nurses aides, run assisted living departments, work in the ER, etc, etc, etc. You just have to know what is allowed within your scope. Of course there is more, but I'm a little pressed for time. I'll try and get back to you again. Good Luck with whatever you decide to do.
  5. Visit  justjenn profile page
    2
    as a lpn nursing student, i have been questioned many times as to "why aren't you going to be a rn?" or, i love it(sarcastic) when people see my name tag & ask me what spn means - when i tell them - practical nurse - they just say "oh, i thought you were a real nurse?" :angryfire

    seems like many people are against us - ana, sna, hospitals, the public in general. in my clinical experience, i have only come across a few rn's that look down on lpn's & even more so- student lpn's. most of them will spend of their time & effort & kindness teaching a rn or bsn student important nursing information (that lpn's also need to know)- while the lpn students are busy doing bedbaths & changing briefs. i have yet to see the 4 yr. nursing students in our hospital help, let alone, change a bedpan.

    i have been hit w/the hard dish of reality that, other than nursing homes & some floor nursing, there is not many places for us. originally, i wanted to work in a ltc, but i got a taste for er & pacu. unfortunately, even after i get my lic., i cannot be hired as a nurse in these areas, but have to settle for a tech.

    differences - well, i do not feel that there is much. heck, we can even learn to start iv's after taking a 3 week course after graduation. most differences, i feel, have a lot to do with medicine. lpn's are like the "jack of all trades & masters of none." rn's are a little more "tuned."

    my biggest problem is with people, especially on this forum, that state to lpn's who are unhappy w/the lack of respect "why don't you go for your rn?" this makes me soooo :angryfire :angryfire . some people do not want all the responsibilities the rn's have, or can't get into a program, or just want to be a patient nurse.

    well, i guess i can step off of my soapbox now. hope this gives you some insite. remember, be proud that you are a lpn student. and above all don't let anyone ever tell you that you are not a real nurse understand?

    justjenn
    sophiadawn7 and sparketteinok like this.
  6. Visit  NursesRmofun profile page
    2
    [font=franklin gothic medium]hi. i would like to add that a lot of what you can and cannot do depends on the state you work in, the facility you work for, and their policies.

    [font=franklin gothic medium]as for how lpns treat rns.....well, it is a sore subject gone over many times. the truth is, we all have our own experiences both good and bad. i was a lpn for years and met very few rns that were demeaning to me. many rns i worked with in certain places told me that they thought i was a rn for years! (maybe they didn't look at my badge?) now that i am a rn, i always show respect to lpns i work with. no person knows everything. i believe that theory that says that everyone you meet knows *something* more about something than you do, no matter what the difference in education may be.
    earroyo56 and momwithlicense like this.
  7. Visit  robin_mds_nurse profile page
    0
    I have been a LPN for 11 years. I have worked in a hospital, and now work in LTC. I was promoted up to an "RN" position 2 years ago, doing MDS, RAPS, and Care Plans that had never been filled by a LPN, now I was promoted again to Medicare PPS Nurse. I am working toward my RN simply because I am tired of having an RN sign off my work. I have worked with many RNs since I have started my Nursing career, and very few have I ever felt looked down on me for being a LPN. Most of the time they will say "You are so smart why don't you get your RN" Well, I am a single mother of a teenager so that is a little easier said than done. I am hoping to finish my degree with Excelsior college. Anyways, I have enjoyed being a LPN.
    I have also worked with some LPNs that were far better nurses than some RN-BSN nurses.
  8. Visit  Marie_LPN, RN profile page
    1
    Quote from justjenn
    as a lpn nursing student, i have been questioned many times as to "why aren't you going to be a rn?" or, i love it(sarcastic) when people see my name tag & ask me what spn means - when i tell them - practical nurse - they just say "oh, i thought you were a real nurse?" :angryfire

    seems like many people are against us - ana, sna, hospitals, the public in general. in my clinical experience, i have only come across a few rn's that look down on lpn's & even more so- student lpn's. most of them will spend of their time & effort & kindness teaching a rn or bsn student important nursing information (that lpn's also need to know)- while the lpn students are busy doing bedbaths & changing briefs. i have yet to see the 4 yr. nursing students in our hospital help, let alone, change a bedpan.

    i have been hit w/the hard dish of reality that, other than nursing homes & some floor nursing, there is not many places for us. originally, i wanted to work in a ltc, but i got a taste for er & pacu. unfortunately, even after i get my lic., i cannot be hired as a nurse in these areas, but have to settle for a tech.

    differences - well, i do not feel that there is much. heck, we can even learn to start iv's after taking a 3 week course after graduation. most differences, i feel, have a lot to do with medicine. lpn's are like the "jack of all trades & masters of none." rn's are a little more "tuned."

    my biggest problem is with people, especially on this forum, that state to lpn's who are unhappy w/the lack of respect "why don't you go for your rn?" this makes me soooo :angryfire :angryfire . some people do not want all the responsibilities the rn's have, or can't get into a program, or just want to be a patient nurse.

    well, i guess i can step off of my soapbox now. hope this gives you some insite. remember, be proud that you are a lpn student. and above all don't let anyone ever tell you that you are not a real nurse understand?

    justjenn

    preach ooooooon sister!!! :hatparty:
    sparketteinok likes this.
  9. Visit  Blackcat99 profile page
    0
    I usually get along well with RN"s and new graduate RN's too. However, there was this one new Rn graduate who seemed to get angry and insulted when I tried to help her. I would make helpful suggestions to help her from making mistakes. However, she acted like "How dare that LPN tell me how to do things" so I finally gave up trying to help her. When she made mistakes I kept my mouth shut. After a month she was fired for incompetency. :chuckle
  10. Visit  angel337 profile page
    0
    Quote from justjenn
    as a lpn nursing student, i have been questioned many times as to "why aren't you going to be a rn?" or, i love it(sarcastic) when people see my name tag & ask me what spn means - when i tell them - practical nurse - they just say "oh, i thought you were a real nurse?" :angryfire

    seems like many people are against us - ana, sna, hospitals, the public in general. in my clinical experience, i have only come across a few rn's that look down on lpn's & even more so- student lpn's. most of them will spend of their time & effort & kindness teaching a rn or bsn student important nursing information (that lpn's also need to know)- while the lpn students are busy doing bedbaths & changing briefs. i have yet to see the 4 yr. nursing students in our hospital help, let alone, change a bedpan.

    i have been hit w/the hard dish of reality that, other than nursing homes & some floor nursing, there is not many places for us. originally, i wanted to work in a ltc, but i got a taste for er & pacu. unfortunately, even after i get my lic., i cannot be hired as a nurse in these areas, but have to settle for a tech.

    differences - well, i do not feel that there is much. heck, we can even learn to start iv's after taking a 3 week course after graduation. most differences, i feel, have a lot to do with medicine. lpn's are like the "jack of all trades & masters of none." rn's are a little more "tuned."

    my biggest problem is with people, especially on this forum, that state to lpn's who are unhappy w/the lack of respect "why don't you go for your rn?" this makes me soooo :angryfire :angryfire . some people do not want all the responsibilities the rn's have, or can't get into a program, or just want to be a patient nurse.

    well, i guess i can step off of my soapbox now. hope this gives you some insite. remember, be proud that you are a lpn student. and above all don't let anyone ever tell you that you are not a real nurse understand?

    justjenn
    jenn, you sound like you have alot to offer the healthcare industry. i am sorry that you have had such negative experiences regarding what you choose to do as a career, but i think most people mean well when they ask about your rn status. i think you should be proud of what you choose to do. i have many friends that are/were lpn's and they experienced the same thing you have such as being denied the opportunity to work in ed and so forth. many times that forces to people to advance their education, but you should only do it if you feel it would truly benefit you. rn's do have more opportunities than lpn's and depending on what you have planned for your future that is something you may want to consider. good luck
  11. Visit  txspadequeenRN profile page
    0
    im going to try and help you out with this. i have been a lvn for years ltc nurse (older people need good care too) . in texas there are 2 things that i have run across that lvn's cant do and they must call a "real nurse". those are spiking blood (you can monitor it but you cant spike it) and pronouncing death. thats it!!! i have worked with nurse's with rnitis, and just keep my head up and move on. most people think im a rn so i dont get flack. and i cant tell you how many times a rn has pulled me aside and said "hey can you show me how to hook up a portable o2 tank". the thing is just work with everyone who cares if your a rn bsn or lvn . lets just take care of our patients the best we can. ill assure you as a hospice nurse , the hands i hold during the last minutes of life dont care what degree i have.. but i was there, and that's what matters.... good luck



    Quote from truly_blessed
    ok, well, i am a pre-nursing student. i am waiting to see if i get accepted to an lpn program right now. i later plan on finishing up and getting my degree after i have worked as an lpn for awhile. since i have made this decision i have heard nothing but horror stories about how lpns are treated by rns. <--i am clueless as to what that's all about. i have also heard it's next to impossible to find work as an lpn. i was told by an rn that there is a huge difference between an rn and an lpn....she said there are a substanitial amount of things that an lvn could not do in a hospital, therefore there was no need for them. hmmm. can someone clear this up for me? i might be a little niave, but i thought there was not too much of a difference besides pay, and a few other reponsibilities. do you feel that lpns get shafted? since i don't have any nurses in my family to talk to, i would very much appreciate any feedback you can give me. thank you in advance.
  12. Visit  SCRN1 profile page
    0
    I work with several LPNs and 2 of them, I greatly respect. (The other one's not bad, it's just that she tends to be a little lazy...personality thing, not a degree thing.) These two ladies have had tons of experience and I have even gone to them with questions before I asked another RN when I started working on this floor. As a return of favor, I always tell them to let me know whenever they need an IV push to be done, blood to be hung, care plan done, or anything else an LPN can't do. Sometimes, while I'm doing something for them, they'll do something for me while I'm doing it. That's the beauty of it all...working together!


    When I worked at another hospital in our area in Labor & Delivery, only RNs were hired...no LPNs or CNAs. On the Mother/Baby floor there, LPNs were hired, but they were used as med nurses. Also at this hospital, CNAs weren't allowed to insert foleys or do BMGs, but at the hospital where I work now, they are allowed to do both. So, I guess it depends on the individual institution what an LPN is allowed to do.
    Good luck in whatever you decide to do!
  13. Visit  Metron profile page
    0
    I noticed a big change in what I was allowed to do when I moved from missouri to Wisconsin. In Missouri, LPN's are IV certified in school (during their program) and are charge nursed in LTC. When I came to WI, I had a rude shock. It seemed like they didn't let me do anything. If someone fell, I had to go get an RN to assess them before we got them up off the floor. After a while, I learned that most of these strange rules were imposed by the facility and were not state regulations. The last few weeks I worked there, they kept assigning me (and the other LPN's) to work as CNA's. Thankfully, I have a new job at a drug/alcohol tx house for women. They are excited to have another nurse and they actually want me here. That's a nice change. I would love to work in Pediatrics - but will have to go back to school first. I used to think I would go right back to school, but I have another career (I'm a pastor) and just don't have time
  14. Visit  KaroSnowQueen profile page
    0
    It depends on your scope of practice, which varies by state which is the DUMBEST thing I have ever heard of. In the state I currently practice in, there are several things I can't do, hang blood, give IV push meds, etc.
    In the other state I have practiced in, which is 20 minutes away, I can do those things, and have never run into anything yet that I can't do. Although I will say both states have let me work in ER.
    I have been an LPN for 20 years and have had many an RN ask me "how do you do X" so I think experience and knowledge have more to do with it than your degree.

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