can lpn be adon

  1. does any one know if a lpn can be adon? i live in kansas and we recently lost are don and they are thinking if it is possible of me being the adon. we are a 34 bed facility attached to a hospital and what they want to do is share the don with the hospital and ltc and the have me as the adon of ltc. does anyone know if this is possible?
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  2. 30 Comments

  3. by   BmtTXLVN
    I dont know if it is legal but i have seen 2 lpn adons here in texas
  4. by   Blackcat99
    I have had several LPN ADON and LPN DON at the LTC's in Washington state.
  5. by   jamangel
    I was an adon at a LTC facility.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    I am employed at a large 205-bed long-term care facility that has one DON and three ADONs. The DON is an RN, whereas the three ADONs are all LVNs. I am in Texas, and it is very common around here for long-term care ADONs to be licensed as LVNs.
  7. by   nurseangel31_03
    does anyone know if you have to have any special training for this?
  8. by   txspadequeenRN
    Most of the LTC's I am aware of the ADON is a LVN. It helps to know the LTC area well and be familiar with policy and procedures of your facility. My personal opinion is you need to have been a LTC nurse first and get the inner workings of the joint. Find out what your job will be cause a lot of ADON's must do staffing be on call and all that great junk.... I also would not accept a ADON job if there was not a permanent DON.
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from jamangel
    I was an adon at a LTC facility.
    Please, jamangel, share with me how you moved up as an LPN. I ask this because I was always under the impression that one had to be an RN in order to be an ADON or DON. Did you have another degree in management? And (if this is not too personal), were you paid the same rate as an RN that held the same position was? Again, if that is a personal question, don't answer...this just peaks my curiousity.

    Thanks!
  10. by   nurseangel31_03
    i have worked at this facility 2 times to total 11 years. i worked closely with the last don and helped with the policies and procedures. i have been a floor there and still fill in as floor nurse regularly when there is no one else. i know all the ins and outs of this facility as well as i can. i have been doing the schedule for the nurses and then for all ltc staff for over 3 years now. it would be better if it was me then one of the other lpn's that work there.
  11. by   TheCommuter
    I shall add that I would never want to be working as an ADON with only an LVN license because the pay is so limited. At my facility, our three ADONs receive a salary of $45,000 per year, which is not a great deal of money when one takes into consideration the enormous amount of work they are responsible for doing.

    They often work 60 hours weekly, but never receive a dime of overtime or bonus pay since they receive a fixed salary. They are on-call in case one of their nurses does not show up for work. In addition, they frequently take the fall if one of their nurses messes up. They must also be in good standing with the management clique at work, or else they'll be demoted. All three of the ADONs at my facility are LVNs with no additional education or college degrees. They simply know the facility's protocol and were promoted after 2 years of being floor nurses.
  12. by   nurseangel31_03
    well i only make about $28000 a year and am payed by the hour and i already fill in when my nurses call in. i already do alot of management stuff and know the policy and procedures. i answer to the don and administer and they back me up on anything i do and are good about helpng me out. we are a very small facility. 34 ltc beds and 12 hospital beds.
  13. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from nurseangel31_03
    well i only make about $28000 a year and am payed by the hour and i already fill in when my nurses call in. i already do alot of management stuff and know the policy and procedures. i answer to the don and administer and they back me up on anything i do and are good about helpng me out. we are a very small facility. 34 ltc beds and 12 hospital beds.
    With overtime I made $47,000 last year, which is a couple thousand more than our overworked ADONs earn. I simply do not want the responsibility of being an ADON with an LVN license. I wouldn't even think of becoming a DON, ADON, or nurse supervisor without an RN license because I want to be paid fairly for the level of accountability.
  14. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I shall add that I would never want to be working as an ADON with only an LVN license because the pay is so limited. At my facility, our three ADONs receive a salary of $45,000 per year, which is not a great deal of money when one takes into consideration the enormous amount of work they are responsible for doing.

    They often work 60 hours weekly, but never receive a dime of overtime or bonus pay since they receive a fixed salary. They are on-call in case one of their nurses does not show up for work. In addition, they frequently take the fall if one of their nurses messes up. They must also be in good standing with the management clique at work, or else they'll be demoted. All three of the ADONs at my facility are LVNs with no additional education or college degrees. They simply know the facility's protocol and were promoted after 2 years of being floor nurses.

    Based on what I am reading, I would have say that I wouldn't want to do it, either. If I wanted to deal with all of that, I would have become an RN. What I would like to know is if there are RNs working at these facilities, and if so, what is their role, if an LVN is a ADON or DON?

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