Anyone else decide to not to go on to RN and stay an LPN?

  1. 10
    Hello fellow nurses,

    I have been an LPN for going on 11 years; worked in LTC for MH/MR, LTC for the elderly,hospital setting and currently homecare. I have always debated and even started at one time working on prereqs for an RN program. I love learning new things and I do love being a nurse,mostly..lol . LPNs will be around forever and I already make a pretty decent pay and only need to work PT(and if ever needed I can work Ft). I love my life;kids raised, great marriage, awesome doggies and it just is pretty relaxing overall....I will continue to learn and take if ever needed CEUs or any classes for knowledge, but I seriously may be done with the RN option. Has anyone else come to this conclusion? Thanks:-)
    JacknSweetpea, lindarn, rena86, and 7 others like this.
  2. 25 Comments so far...

  3. 5
    I have been an LPN for 23 years and I love it. I am so over being treated like I'm less than a nurse because I don't have RN next to my name. You should hear what some of my patients have to say about the "real nurses" and their bedside manor. I too have raised my kids, have a hubby , a home and a life... two cats and piece of mind.
    SeattleGirl, CNA1991, ChristinP, and 2 others like this.
  4. 5
    unfortunately, there would always be those people who would look down on lpns because they are ignorant to what an lpn is. if you are content with being an lpn, there is nothing wrong with that. at least you know what you want. you should only do the rn for you and not for something else. unfortunately, i do get more respect now that i am an rn. i don't know why when i knew most of the stuff i know when i was an lpn.
    Errin1, Julie19, JacknSweetpea, and 2 others like this.
  5. 0
    As a nurse with a bachelors who knows of *several* shall I say sweet positions that I don't qualify for because I am a RN and not an LPN I can understand the appeal. If you become an RN, your role is overwhelmingly pushed towards bedside nursing in a hospital setting. I actually think it is easier to leave the bedside as LPN (since they don't want to hire you in hospitals anymore).

    I always hear nursing students (RN) that come on my floor talking about how they just want to work in a doctors office. I have to remind them that Doctors are cheap and aren't gonna pay for a RN if they can get a LPN or God forbid a 'Medical Assistant' (who have exactly what kind of license, since most are barely HS grads?).

    Anyway back to my point. At my old job there was a position on a long term forensic unit that was super easy. But I couldn't work there full-time cause I was an RN, and they were only required to have a LPN (go figure). Was not like they pay bad either.
  6. 4
    Quote from Borntobenurse?
    God forbid a 'Medical Assistant' (who have exactly what kind of license, since most are barely HS grads?).
    Not responding to the actual question in thread but am responding to comment regarding the "God Forbidden Medical Assistants".....I sure hope that perhaps you are specifically talking about the medical assistants that may not be certified because I will have you know that they are manyyyyyyyyy medical assistants that are CERTIFIED.....me being one of them. In regards to "barely HS grads"...not only am I a HS grad but college grad and hopefully soon to be a student in an ASN-RN program (finding out first week of April), 4.0 GPA, 3 kids and a husband . I have worked at DUKE as a CMA. I did more work than the RN'S!!!!! For that very reason I was driven back to school....why should I do all the work while the RN's sit and do almost nothing....(I'm sure there will be those RN's that have something to say about that last statement)

    So please be careful not to demean others by broad generalizations that do not have real merit. The same way a RN would not like my previous statement regarding sitting down doing less than a CMA the CMA does not appreciate statements that make them out to be uneducated individuals. So let's all try to support one another while we all work for the benefit of our patients..
    Errin1, JacknSweetpea, caraj829, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    i've said it 100s if not 1000s of times i love being a lpn! and darn it i'm good at.
    the only reason i am pursuing my rn is because of the job market only. it's getting harder to find a job other than in ltc which means there is not enough jobs to hire us all.

    i recently applied for a nurse intake position with a homecare agency. i was disappointed when the manager told me that the state requires a licensed person to do this so we give it to the lpns rather than have them see patients.
  8. 7
    Hi there. I know you may not like this, but I want to encourage you to get your RN license. I got my LVN (California) in 1993. I started in the Newborn Nursery and got into Case Management in order to have stable hours to spend more time with my daughter. When I started in Case Management in the 90's, positions for LVN's in various settings were plentiful. Now, there are only 4 LVN's in my whole hospital. They took the LVN's off the floor and told them to become transporters or find other jobs, which is terrible. Administration decided to phase out LVN's as they strive to achieve "Magnet Status" which all the hospitals across the country are doing. Have you heard of "BSN in 10?" This is also a push for Magnet Status and they want all RN's to have BSN in 10 years, which will ultimately do away with ADN programs in the future. There was an article posted by my school about New York being the first state to officially announce that they are doing away with LPN's. So I disagree...LPN/LVN will NOT be around forever. I felt like I had to apologize for not having gone the distance and secured an RN license among my peers that were RN's. Nursing is changing; and while I, like you, wanted respect for being an LVN, it just wasn't happening. Opportunities on and off the floor are becoming fewer, except maybe in nursing homes. I took NCLEX-RN this past Saturday and passed. So now my hospital has 3 LVN's left. I did the RN program while being a full-time employee and though it was tough, I'm happy for the opportunities my new license will afford me. The good thing is you can always keep your LPN license if you want, but get the RN so you will always have a career, just in case. Better safe than sorry. Good luck.
    SharkLPN, caliotter3, xoemmylouox, and 4 others like this.
  9. 2
    For as long as I can remember I have always spent my life thinking about the next step. Always trying to challenge myself, accomplish one thing and then move on to the next thing and then the next and the next. So it seems obvious that once I got my LPN the next step would be to get my RN.

    But circumstances have made that impossible up to now. And although I have had some profound regrets, there is a lot to be said for stopping the train and enjoying the feeling of being comfortable with where I am, feeling confident in what I know, and just committing to one thing without always thinking that this is going to be a temporary stop until the next step.

    I'm an experienced nurse now, I fought hard to get to this place in my career and my life; I want to spend some time being content with my life for a change.

    So yes, I want to go on for my RN, if it happens that's fine, if it doesn't then I'll be OK with that.
    juzme and zorabanks like this.
  10. 0
    Quote from myjgang
    Not responding to the actual question in thread but am responding to comment regarding the "God Forbidden Medical Assistants".....I sure hope that perhaps you are specifically talking about the medical assistants that may not be certified because I will have you know that they are manyyyyyyyyy medical assistants that are CERTIFIED.....me being one of them. In regards to "barely HS grads"...not only am I a HS grad but college grad and hopefully soon to be a student in an ASN-RN program (finding out first week of April), 4.0 GPA, 3 kids and a husband . I have worked at DUKE as a CMA. I did more work than the RN'S!!!!! For that very reason I was driven back to school....why should I do all the work while the RN's sit and do almost nothing....(I'm sure there will be those RN's that have something to say about that last statement)

    So please be careful not to demean others by broad generalizations that do not have real merit. The same way a RN would not like my previous statement regarding sitting down doing less than a CMA the CMA does not appreciate statements that make them out to be uneducated individuals. So let's all try to support one another while we all work for the benefit of our patients..
    so true..
  11. 1
    Quote from myjgang
    Not responding to the actual question in thread but am responding to comment regarding the "God Forbidden Medical Assistants".....I sure hope that perhaps you are specifically talking about the medical assistants that may not be certified because I will have you know that they are manyyyyyyyyy medical assistants that are CERTIFIED.....me being one of them. In regards to "barely HS grads"...not only am I a HS grad but college grad and hopefully soon to be a student in an ASN-RN program (finding out first week of April), 4.0 GPA, 3 kids and a husband . I have worked at DUKE as a CMA. I did more work than the RN'S!!!!! For that very reason I was driven back to school....why should I do all the work while the RN's sit and do almost nothing....(I'm sure there will be those RN's that have something to say about that last statement)

    So please be careful not to demean others by broad generalizations that do not have real merit. The same way a RN would not like my previous statement regarding sitting down doing less than a CMA the CMA does not appreciate statements that make them out to be uneducated individuals. So let's all try to support one another while we all work for the benefit of our patients..
    I'm not sure what DUKE is or what it has to do with anything. Is it better than other facilities? Are you better than other CMAs because you worked there? Is this a competition? I'm not understanding your point.

    However. If you do not like people making broad generalizations about you and the work you do, you might start by not making broad generalizations about the work that other people do.

    If you feel that an RN -- or LPN or anyone -- might be offended by a statement, then by making that statement you have offended with intent. Perhaps you should start your future nursing career off by taking the high road, and refrain from making offensive statements.
    caliotter3 likes this.


Top