any lvns here do home health?

  1. how do you like it? what are the requirements? What do you do exactly and is there alot of paperwork? Thanks!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   TheCommuter
    Many of my coworkers do home health cases on the side, as a second job. They seem to like what they do. Since you will be the only healthcare professional in the house, the agencies around here require at least 6 months of bedside experience before hiring you. After all, you will not be able to ask a coworker or experienced nurse questions if you do not understand something during your cases.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    I did it my first year as a nurse, as a side job. If you are leery, at least visit the prospective case first while the other nurse is there and let them show you the ropes. If you don't think you can handle it, then do not accept the job. The reason why I suggest that you visit while another nurse is there (or agree not to stay too long) is because you are legally responsible for that client if something happens and you are the licensed medical worker there (alone). The nurse can orient you and enlighten you on family dynamics, which, is a major factor in home care. I visited my client, saw I can handle it and stayed for about 10 months on Saturdays, only. What made me leave were the family dynamics...they got on my nerves. Nice people, but I saw risks on my license that were not worth taking.

    I plan to go back to it once I have a bit more of med-surg under my belt. Good luck!
  5. by   Bala Shark
    I graduated last year and got a home health job (private duty)..The agency required a year experience and I had only 8 months but they hired me anyway...I see two patients a week for 40 hours..It is laid back at times..

    In my opinion, the family are the supervisors..They are the ones that are going to judge you...It is a very independent job..One of my patients that I see, I am the only one at their home, most of the time..
  6. by   caliotter3
    Off and on, even while I was working in LTC, have been doing home health for going on 15 years now and wouldn't trade it for the world. It has disadvantages as well as advantages, like all things in life, but you can't beat the up side. You can devote all your efforts to one patient. Big downside can be the family, looking over your shoulder, and getting too involved to the detriment of the patient. You have to learn how to accept their direction, be diplomatic in explaining things to them, put your foot down when it comes to the best interests of the patient, and learn how to say good-bye to the case, when you can no longer be an effective caregiver, should it come to that. A lot of your ability to handle the job well depends on the backup you get from your agency. When your agency does not treat you with respect, and back up your judgement in nursing issues, then it is time to find a new agency. Good luck to you if you decide to try home health.
  7. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from caliotter3
    Off and on, even while I was working in LTC, have been doing home health for going on 15 years now and wouldn't trade it for the world. It has disadvantages as well as advantages, like all things in life, but you can't beat the up side. You can devote all your efforts to one patient. Big downside can be the family, looking over your shoulder, and getting too involved to the detriment of the patient. You have to learn how to accept their direction, be diplomatic in explaining things to them, put your foot down when it comes to the best interests of the patient, and learn how to say good-bye to the case, when you can no longer be an effective caregiver, should it come to that. A lot of your ability to handle the job well depends on the backup you get from your agency. When your agency does not treat you with respect, and back up your judgement in nursing issues, then it is time to find a new agency. Good luck to you if you decide to try home health.
    I can certainly identify with family dynamics; it can be advantageous or detrimental, depending on the people as well as the agency. You have to also improvise when there are no supplies available. An example can be this; a diabetic patient who cannot afford to purchase good foods to maintain their diet. You can't buy it for them; the family may not be that cooperative...what do you do? Do you feed them what is available? What is your liability for doing so? I do plan to return to home care at a later date, once I get some more experience under my belt. I was only a nurse for 4 months when I got my home care case...didn't know too much, but I made sure I read about the medications and asked the agency of their protocols in case of emergencies. And, when the case got on my nerves, I cut it off like a bad habit, had no regrets and didn't look back.
  8. by   newlvngrad
    Thanks for your reply. Are you an LVN? I heard that home health is easier for LVNs because they get all the none complicated cases and they dont have all the paperwork that RNs have. Is this true? what kinds of cases have you gotten?
  9. by   CAlvn77
    I did Home Health visits. I would stay at the patients house for like 45 minutes and leave. I did my paper work while i was at the patients house! I loved it! Unfortunatley the owner closed it down to move back home to germany. The owner paid our cell phone bill and reimbursed for gas! The easiest job i have ever had. I would see 4 to 5 patients a day! Wish i could find another one like that!

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