Give first-aid first while waiting for the cure

  1. Give first-aid first while waiting for the cure....that's what they did in 2005...the cure even didn't come....put another first-aid...
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Give first-aid first while waiting for the cure....that's what they did in 2005...the cure even didn't come....put another first-aid...
    Sorry, but there was relief; there is no reason in the world that the US is required to open its doors for everyone that wishes to come here. Nurses actually have it much easier than most other professions and can get expedited for a green card, it does not require that you wait five years to get it. But in that same token, it also does not mean that the US must take everyone that wants to come. There will always be more that wish to come, than can.

    And there are areas in the US where there are no shortages, and you will not even find petitioning being done. So do not think that the shortage is all over. There are certain areas that have above average needs, but it is definitely not all.

    And this was never meant as first aid, there is no reason for that. It has already been documented on how many nurses that there are in the US, the issue is that some are now retiring. Those that have years of experiene will find it much easier to get placement in the first place, as well as those that hold a Master's degree.

    New grad and no experience, do not expect a ton of job offers to come dropping at your feet. Nurses that have graduated and have the OPT are even finding difficulties in getting offers at this point and they are able to start work right away with a valid document that will permit them to work.

    The US has other issues that are slightly more important than creating or re-approtioning visas for nurses. Visas available tomorrw do not solve any problems in any form. There is still the immigration process, as well as a much-needed orientation as to how we do things in the US. And they are about as different as can be from the hospitals in PI. So the nurses are not instantly available in the hospital to fill an empty slot in the schedule.

    Far from it.
  4. by   mpoova
    Quote from suzanne4
    Sorry, but there was relief; there is no reason in the world that the US is required to open its doors for everyone that wishes to come here. Nurses actually have it much easier than most other professions and can get expedited for a green card, it does not require that you wait five years to get it. But in that same token, it also does not mean that the US must take everyone that wants to come. There will always be more that wish to come, than can.

    And there are areas in the US where there are no shortages, and you will not even find petitioning being done. So do not think that the shortage is all over. There are certain areas that have above average needs, but it is definitely not all.

    And this was never meant as first aid, there is no reason for that. It has already been documented on how many nurses that there are in the US, the issue is that some are now retiring. Those that have years of experiene will find it much easier to get placement in the first place, as well as those that hold a Master's degree.

    New grad and no experience, do not expect a ton of job offers to come dropping at your feet. Nurses that have graduated and have the OPT are even finding difficulties in getting offers at this point and they are able to start work right away with a valid document that will permit them to work.

    The US has other issues that are slightly more important than creating or re-approtioning visas for nurses. Visas available tomorrw do not solve any problems in any form. There is still the immigration process, as well as a much-needed orientation as to how we do things in the US. And they are about as different as can be from the hospitals in PI. So the nurses are not instantly available in the hospital to fill an empty slot in the schedule.

    Far from it.
    wonder still CGFNS / RN are conducted at various test centers all over the world? Petitions accepted and approved? Visa fee accepted? and then no reason to welcome and so wait! The fact remains that the selected ones are as per US requirements.The issue now is not that US requires foreign trained nurses or not, The problem is the flaws of immigration laws which abruptly stoped nurses visas.
    and one can wish there will be fix for FT nurses, both band aid and permanent soon! as they can be the part of solution for years to come.
    Last edit by mpoova on Apr 8, '07 : Reason: ..
  5. by   rass
    Quote from suzanne4
    sorry, but there was relief; there is no reason in the world that the us is required to open its doors for everyone that wishes to come here. nurses actually have it much easier than most other professions and can get expedited for a green card, it does not require that you wait five years to get it. but in that same token, it also does not mean that the us must take everyone that wants to come. there will always be more that wish to come, than can.

    and there are areas in the us where there are no shortages, and you will not even find petitioning being done. so do not think that the shortage is all over. there are certain areas that have above average needs, but it is definitely not all.

    and this was never meant as first aid, there is no reason for that. it has already been documented on how many nurses that there are in the us, the issue is that some are now retiring. those that have years of experiene will find it much easier to get placement in the first place, as well as those that hold a master's degree.

    new grad and no experience, do not expect a ton of job offers to come dropping at your feet. nurses that have graduated and have the opt are even finding difficulties in getting offers at this point and they are able to start work right away with a valid document that will permit them to work.

    the us has other issues that are slightly more important than creating or re-approtioning visas for nurses. visas available tomorrw do not solve any problems in any form. there is still the immigration process, as well as a much-needed orientation as to how we do things in the us. and they are about as different as can be from the hospitals in pi. so the nurses are not instantly available in the hospital to fill an empty slot in the schedule.

    far from it.

    hi suzanne,
    thanks a lot for very good forum here.
    could i ask you:
    1. for what reasons we are posting and you are answer tons of questions here if nursing immigration is not important for you as well as for us lawmakers?

    2. i agree that there was no reason to pay a lot of money, spend thousands hours on preparation for nclex and ielts or toefl, getting visa screen if us do not need foreign nurses anymore. so, correct me please, but you suggestion is following: "you should wait as much as possible having all your papers and sertificates". i really cannot realize, what is the benefit from that waiting for us nurses like you or for us healthcare system?

    3. ok, you are worried about many low-experienced young nurses in the us hospitals. it is understandable. however, why you decided that we are all low-experienced young nurses? or many of us? i, for example, have more than 15 years of experience as well as some of my friends. we should have the results of immigration statistic in term of experience before claiming lack of experience among foreign nurses.

    thank you.
  6. by   FutureUSRN
    Good news will soon come..and as in the past , it will help us, Foreign Nurses, get immigrant visas (Green Card)...but it's just the beginning of our journey....

    Everyone started with no experience...but sooner or later, most Foreign Nurses will make it to the top than the locals. Actually, most locals are jealous of the foreign nurses who have BSN because they easily climb-up the ladder....local nurses are also threatened by the influx of foreign nurses....I don't know why....only one thing I know...we, foreign nurses, have the will to survive and the drive to succeed!!!

    Hope to hear the good news soon...but for the meantime, I still enjoy my life while still here in the Philippines.
    Last edit by FutureUSRN on Apr 8, '07
  7. by   suzanne4
    Quote from mpoova
    wonder still CGFNS / RN are conducted at various test centers all over the world? Petitions accepted and approved? Visa fee accepted? and then no reason to welcome and so wait! The fact remains that the selected ones are as per US requirements.The issue now is not that US requires foreign trained nurses or not, The problem is the flaws of immigration laws which abruptly stoped nurses visas.
    and one can wish there will be fix for FT nurses, both band aid and permanent soon! as they can be the part of solution for years to come.
    There are only so many visas in every category of work in the US, it has never been wide open and never expect it to be. You are just seeing many more nurses that wish to work in the US. It does not mean that the US must create a visa for each and every one of them.

    Same way that any other country does things.
  8. by   suzanne4
    Quote from rass
    hi suzanne,
    thanks a lot for very good forum here.
    could i ask you:
    1. for what reasons we are posting and you are answer tons of questions here if nursing immigration is not important for you as well as for us lawmakers?

    2. i agree that there was no reason to pay a lot of money, spend thousands hours on preparation for nclex and ielts or toefl, getting visa screen if us do not need foreign nurses anymore. so, correct me please, but you suggestion is following: "you should wait as much as possible having all your papers and sertificates". i really cannot realize, what is the benefit from that waiting for us nurses like you or for us healthcare system?

    3. ok, you are worried about many low-experienced young nurses in the us hospitals. it is understandable. however, why you decided that we are all low-experienced young nurses? or many of us? i, for example, have more than 15 years of experience as well as some of my friends. we should have the results of immigration statistic in term of experience before claiming lack of experience among foreign nurses.

    thank you.
    please take the time to do some reading here. and you will see where i am coming from. and who i was responding to.

    first, i have been helping foreign nurses for more than 20 years, it is not something that i have just started to do. but the issue is that if you have experience and a fair amount of it, you will not have a problem finding a petitioner for the us. those that are new grads, and with minimum clinical training in their country are finding many issues right now.

    it is always much easier to find a petitioner if the nurse has passed the nclex exam. there are agencies in the philippines that are pushing the cgfns exam, which is only required in a handful of states, and the nurse is only getting placed in a nursing home and it not getting rn salary until they are in the us and have passed the nclex exam. some agencies are not even submitting application to the state until they arrive in the us.

    this goes for foreign nurses that graduated in the us, it is always much easier for them to find a job if they have passed the nclex first. and it goes the same for the american rn as well.

    creating visas for foreign nurses does not fix anything in the us, it definitely does not address the issues that the nursing schools here are having, not enough instructors, etc. and if the nurse that wishes to come over has a master's degree in nursing, then they are in another category, the eb-2 and things get done quicker.

    waiting to have the exams completed before appying gets you a much better job selection. the training that you had in your country will make you verty marketable no matter where you wish to go.
    -------------------------
    nurses have been fast-tracked over the past few years, in the past they had to be here for five years to get a green card. nurses now jump to the head of the line. but there are still only so many visas that are issued per year, and this does not matter which field that you are in. the us does not have an open door policy.

    there are many that are going into nursing for the sole purpose of getting to the us and they never wanted to be a nurse in the first place, but are not doing it as it is a fast-track to the us, and most of those are not lasting in the profession when they get here.
  9. by   suzanne4
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Good news will soon come..and as in the past , it will help us, Foreign Nurses, get immigrant visas (Green Card)...but it's just the beginning of our journey....

    Everyone started with no experience...but sooner or later, most Foreign Nurses will make it to the top than the locals. Actually, most locals are jealous of the foreign nurses who have BSN because they easily climb-up the ladder....local nurses are also threatened by the influx of foreign nurses....I don't know why....only one thing I know...we, foreign nurses, have the will to survive and the drive to succeed!!!

    Hope to hear the good news soon...but for the meantime, I still enjoy my life while still here in the Philippines.

    Sorry, but not sure where you are getting your information from. It is way off base.

    And I am definitely not threatened by foreign nurses. Please take the time to do some more reading, and get your sources correct. Sounds like they are coming from the same politician that does not know the difference between the VSC and CGFNS Certificate.
  10. by   letina
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Actually, most locals are jealous of the foreign nurses who have BSN because they easily climb-up the ladder....local nurses are also threatened by the influx of foreign nurses....I don't know why....only one thing I know...we, foreign nurses, have the will to survive and the drive to succeed!!!
    Have to disagree with you on this. Speaking from my own personal experience, my American nurse colleagues are the ones who have kept me going through some difficult times. I have never experienced an ounce of resentment, in fact I have been welcomed with open arms.

    I'm guessing your attitude of "we foreign nurses have the will to survive and the drive to succeed" is the thing that may be causing some to feel "threatened"......sounds like you are not willing to integrate and assimilate. Please remember, we ARE foreigners, and as such, are guests in this country.
  11. by   cariad
    have to agree with you there letina, we are the immigrants over here, whether its from the uk, the phillipines or any other part of the world.
    i feel sorry for all the nurses who want to come here and are stuck in retrogression. i understand how it feels to be wanting to do something and not knowing when that will happen.
    opportunities are for everyone who wants to work over here, and to say that you are more motivated than some may be true, but thats not because of where you come from.
    i went through a period in my life where work was just something to earn money at while i raised my children.
    not everyones priorities are the same.
  12. by   MARI 1
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Good news will soon come..and as in the past , it will help us, Foreign Nurses, get immigrant visas (Green Card)...but it's just the beginning of our journey....

    Everyone started with no experience...but sooner or later, most Foreign Nurses will make it to the top than the locals. Actually, most locals are jealous of the foreign nurses who have BSN because they easily climb-up the ladder....local nurses are also threatened by the influx of foreign nurses....I don't know why....only one thing I know...we, foreign nurses, have the will to survive and the drive to succeed!!!

    Hope to hear the good news soon...but for the meantime, I still enjoy my life while still here in the Philippines.
    My Response to your comments above are:

    I am really quite surprised that you make those comments!!!!

    I have come to the USA from Canada and I would not make that type of statement. The "locals" AMERICANS are not jealous of foreign nurses, this is a country of immigrants from all over the world.
    The nurses that come with experience after orientation usually get up to speed in a reasonable amount of time. However there are many that find it difficult, most need to start in med/surg and get some experience before they can deal with places like ICU or ER... many of the new grads without clinical experience come and need more time added on to their orientations... I have heard this over and over again from RN's, HR, RN floor supervisors.
    So I would think that it would bother a nurse here, if they were getting the same pay and having to train someone for months longer than it should take. Your statement about the foreign nurses climbing up the ladder is another one that is not accurate. Any nurse that works and gets required courses completed and last but not least wants to be promoted (some people are happy being a good nurse and don't want the titles) has that opportunity in the USA. I can't say that all American hospitals are the same, however I can say everywhere I have been they promote based on merit that is earned. Is that the same where you are from????
    I also do know that if one comes to another country with an attitude that they are better and know more than anyone else, life will be a lot harder here than it needs to be. I would say the best advice I can provide you with is to wait until you live here to make statements about how Americans think and feel, also humility goes a long way. You must also learn to be assertive, not aggressive.
    The people I have met here in the USA have been wonderful, kind and welcoming to me. I have traveled to many places in this world and I never walked in thinking I am better than those who live there in each country I have been to. I respect people, their traditions, culture and language. The USA and Canada are both lands of immigrants, so there is much to learn when you get here.. you will meet and work with many foreign nurses, from all over the world. They for the most part, will be judging you on your work performance, not on what they have been told Philippino's are like.
    You might work with someone from Africa, Canada, Europe and many other places. Those people could be patients or co-workers. Each and everyone of us brings something valuable to the table. The most important lesson is to learn to respect others. As far as having a BSN...the basic requirement, I have met and worked with many Americans that have MSN, Nurse Practitioner and even PHD in nursing... so please no one is threatened by a BSN. The quality and level of the diploma nurses here in the USA is higher than other countries. They all take continueing education courses. The whole purpose of having that education is to provide the best quality of care to your patients. The patients don't ask if you have a degree if you treat them badly or well. The patients are not worried about you climbing any ladder, they need you to do your job and be there for them.

    I am planning on going to the Philippines later this year an I would never make those kind of comments without even visiting your country first and even afterwards. I have heard many horror stories... but I reserve judgement until I see it with my own eyes. I will not go there with the expectation that life in the Philippines is based on the standards that are available here in North America. There is good and bad no matter where you are in the world...
    The best thing one can do is surround yourself with good people, keep your eyes and ears open... but be slow to make remarks until you know the whole story. Having been on vacation in the USA does not make anyone an expert.

    Please keep an open mind, be willing to learn in all situations. Life is a journey and not a destination. Every day we are on this planet it is a day of learning new things.
    Last edit by MARI 1 on Apr 8, '07 : Reason: make changes
  13. by   FutureUSRN
    Now that I got all your attention....:trout:

    Can somebody tell me what's ANA's position regarding having a temporary relief and that's schedule A visa?

    Can somebody tell me what's ANA's position regarding Foreign-educated nurses and their immigration into the US?

    A friend told me that ANA is lobbying against temporary relief and I am not sure if that is true.
  14. by   MARI 1
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Now that I got all your attention....:trout:

    Can somebody tell me what's ANA's position regarding having a temporary relief and that's schedule A visa?

    Can somebody tell me what's ANA's position regarding Foreign-educated nurses and their immigration into the US?

    A friend told me that ANA is lobbying against temporary relief and I am not sure if that is true.
    Your comments above are not what this particular thread is about...
    However I will answer what you have written here...

    They do not want any temporary workers at all..

    NO.... NO... and NO again... they do not want any temporary workers coming it. Reason being... they want a permanent staff that can legally stay in the country. It takes foreign nurses at least 6 months to adjust to the cultural and work differences. Some even take longer to get through the orientation periods(especially if they have not worked in their own country). Hospitals invest a lot of time and money into training their RN's they do not want to pay for temporary staff that will need to go home. Think it through would pay for relocation, sign on bonuses etc for temporary worker.. No.... The hospitals are not going to do this and then send the employee home. Hospitals do not want to be in the business of immigration, they do not want to hire two or more people for the HR departments to handle all the paperwork involved with that, it is too costly for them. Yes there are people that work doing travel nursing... but if you ask any of them... coming to the USA and working travel right away is just insanity for anyone and next to impossible to do a good job. You need at the very least 1 year on the job to work in travel.

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