Difference between nursing in the UK vs nursing in the US? - page 8

Seems everyone's legging it from the UK to the US. What's the deal?... Read More

  1. by   madwife2002
    The lack of Annual leave/sick leave in the US is a killer
  2. by   ZippyGBR
    Quote from Skwidward
    So do nurses in the UK not start IVs?
    not everyone cannulates

    my clinicla background is Emergency Department / assessment units - nearly all of us cannaulte in both those settings, same in critical care / CCU opther areas it depends, - the key facotr really is how often you are likely to use the skill

    Are you allowed to give IV push meds?
    generally yes often a preceptorship outcome if not covered pre-reg

    A couple of you mentioned that you can give angina meds at your own discretion, does this mean that you have a standing/prn order from the pt's doc or are you able to prescribe these meds yourself?
    or a patient group direction for the clinical area

    e.g. when working in the Emergency dept we had PGDs in place for
    -analgesia at initial assesmsent ( paracetamol, paracetamol/ codeine / ibuprofen, and the NPS had a few more options)
    - local anesthesia for wound closure, finger injuries and where indicated for eyes
    - aspirin and GTN for cardiac chest pain

    the Nurse practitioners had a whole further list around their practice
  3. by   ZippyGBR
    Quote from oreo75
    Starting pay for nurses in the UK is 19,166 which is staring band 5 money for a registered nurse, before you get your registeration you get paid at band 3 which is 14,037.

    Hope this helps.
    but it doesn't take account of the unsocial hours payments

    + 30% for night shifts, hours worked after2000 hrs if not part of a night shift and any hours on saturday

    +60% for sundays and bank holidays
  4. by   ZippyGBR
    Quote from RGN1
    I have no idea! It's just an old traditional thing that I think has gone on into modern nursing for no good reason. I believe that if you work on a urology ward you are allowed to train to do so, I would also expect that goes for A&E/ICU too. However, if you are on a standard med/surg ward in most places you can't catheterise male patients - so they just have to put up with the discomfort until the doc is free!

    Of course I expect things are changing, slowly, I'm sure there are hospitals now that do allow nurses to cath males but not in my area, at least not yet anyway. the biggest reason things might change though is the new cut backs on junior doc hours, I think they'll have to allow nurses to cath males in general wards or some poor blokes bladder's gonna burst!
    it's a wierd and wonderful, primarily the not has been becasue of urology docs worried aobut their patients and the difficult catheterisation that soem of their patient's pose

    most male RNs in the uk can and do catheterise Males - and it;s the unwritten rule that it's somethign that we will do and female RNs will cath females we (maleRNs ) look after , that said where i work now several of my female colleagues can and do catheterise males
  5. by   KNOV
    Hello,
    I've read through this thread recently and have a few questions. What is the nursing status now that some time has passed? Are UK grads having a hard time finding jobs/ is there a huge shortage? I am a recent nurse graduate trying to gain experience before I am able to do travel nursing. I am very interested in working in the UK I have researched several travel agencies that advertise that they assist U.S. nurses. Any recommended locations to start/live? I'm not so worried about the pay cuts that I'll endure.. just the transition from moving so far away.

    Thanks,
    Kristin
  6. by   ZippyGBR
    Quote from KNOVA
    Hello,
    I've read through this thread recently and have a few questions. What is the nursing status now that some time has passed?
    status in what sense ?

    a lot of the stuff that was seen as 'new' 4 years ago when the thread was started is more and more normal now

    Are UK grads having a hard time finding jobs/ is there a huge shortage? I am a recent nurse graduate trying to gain experience before I am able to do travel nursing. I am very interested in working in the UK I have researched several travel agencies that advertise that they assist U.S. nurses. Any recommended locations to start/live? I'm not so worried about the pay cuts that I'll endure.. just the transition from moving so far away.
    unless you are an EU passport holder you have a fairly slim chance of getting employment in the UK at present, there are only a few speciality specific roles that remain on the shortage list for getting work permits.

    pay wise things have moved on in terms of rates etc

    current pay rates

    Pay rates 2010/2011 - RCN
  7. by   sarahjones
    Can anyone help me?

    My husband has an opportunity to start work in America, which would be a fantastic opportunity for me and my three young children. The only problem that I have and which concerns me greatly is that I am currently studying my BSc (Hons) Adult Nursing, and once qualified would want to work as an adult nurse (obviously).

    However I have been on alot of forums and visited many websites that even though once I qualifiy with a BSc (Hons) Adult Nursing this would not be enough to work in the US as a nurse, which has disapointed me greatly.

    If this is the case, then what is the point of qualifying if i can't gain employment within the US as a nurse, which would ruin my dream, or do I say to my husband you cant take up the job and stay here in the UK, which would shatter his dreams .

    If anyone can help and give me proper constructive advice, such as you do a top up course in the US or it doesnt matter, as to be fair I would only be applying for jobs within the US which would be field specific, unless for example on a surgical ward (Upper GI) with the US caters for child and adults (which is obviously not the case here in the UK).

    Another point to add, i do find it hard to believe, that the BSc Hons Degree would not be recognised within the US as it is totally acceptable in other coutries around the world such as Australia, Cananda and may more.


    Please help
  8. by   Silverdragon102
    Unless your transcripts show both clinical and theory in Paeds, Mental Health, Obstetrics and Adult (know Adult will be covered) you will not meet US requirements, they are general trained opposed to the UK which is more specialised. I think you will also find that Canada requires the same in clinical and theory hours on your transcripts as the US. I know many UK nurses that had to do some top up courses or some form of assessment (SEC) and then courses to meet Canadian requirements (I also had to make up courses and I trained back in the 80's as a EN and 97 as a Rn and had plenty of separate hours in the 4 subjects.

    There are no top up courses in the UK and many struggle in the UK to find schools that will allow them to join to meet requirements
  9. by   americanrose
    STNEeotser there is something here in the UK called patient group directives which give the authorisation to give things such as basic pain relief, indigestion relief, etc with medications or treatments. I work in emergency medicine and our nurses assess patients and can go straight away to a doctor to authorise pain relief and other assessments are standard such as ECG for any chest pain, head injury, collapse/fall and so on.

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