Allowing Corpsman to Become Nurses - page 7

Watching the Presidential debate tonight and a statement by Obama made my head turn. He was relating a story when a corpsman was stating that he has treated wounded soldiers but when he became a... Read More

  1. Visit  Cro-Magnon} profile page
    1
    I was a FMF Corpsman, and have to say that a corpsman's education is vast and varied. I agree that a Corpsman should be able to hop into a RN program. Usually they are intelligent, and used to a great amount of responsibility. Personally, the idea of being a LPN freaks me out. The scope of practice makes me feel claustrophobic.
    The scope of practice for a Corpsman is difficult to define. Whatever you learn to do, you can do. You learn to assess, diagnosis and have a plan of care. If you do well enough, the Medical Officers begin to trust your judgement. You can prescribe medications, perform minor surgery, and many other things.
    Our education has some gaps in it, especially if you're attached to a marine unit. It's a specific clientele, with specific needs. It is absolutely necessary to fill the gaps in my opinion.

    Our experience on the other hand is one of a kind.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
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  3. Visit  mmm333} profile page
    1
    It gets complicated. Every SEAL and SWCC gets trained as a "medic assistant" (enough to call them combat medics) roughly at the EMT-B level + IV therapy and medevacs. The "lead medics" attend at a minimum, the NSW combat medic course which automatically allows them to challenge EMT-P. From there they can get a number of advanced courses including the 18D special forces medic course. IDC etc. NSW medics are among the most highly-trained medics in the military. However, unless becoming a Corpsman first beforehand, none of these people must be or need actually be a Corpsman prior to this! This is because SEAL (SO) and SWCC (SB) ratings were recently created for them to focus on their main skills and not get caught up in the "big Navy" details or have to study that stuff in order to advance in rank. LVN can be a mismatch with the acuity these guys are used to. However they do run sick call and clinics as well. Most of these guys are going PA or RN, not LVN, after getting out.
    They usually get the Navy to pay for that and stay in 10 more years after their badass days are over, OR they get out and use GI Bill to start a civilian career. My lead medic is the one who recommended that I become an RN before I got out (which I did using GI Bill).
    We talk about owing our vets, well- has anyone checked how much the post-9/11 GI Bill pays out for school + living expenses? It's a hell of a lot! We're doing a pretty good job of making it possible for them to become nurses, they just need the info shared with them.

    A number of schools give MAJOR ("shoe-in") preference to vets such as CSU East Bay and other CSUs. In general there is another HUGE and somewhat lesser known benefit- most schools give "priority enrollment" to vets (first seats, no waitlists to get into high-demand majors/classes/prerequisites, etc. right behind the disabled students, dates are always before anyone else can pick their classes and sign up). This allows vets to get all prereqs knocked out faster because they always get the class and schedule that they want.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  4. Visit  mmm333} profile page
    0
    Yeah it's all over the map- some medics to trach intubation/IV/IO, some don't. The have massive overlaps and some lacking knowledge in the sciences and the patho in many cases. In general they get shortchanged but once in a program they will have an advantage and then another advantage in the job hunt when people select their resumes first. I would tell any corpsman or medic to use GI Bill, knock out the prereqs, go nail the BSN, and get hired. Or wrap their PA prereqs into the very end of a BA/BS degree in health science/chem/pharmacology stuff and then go to PA for grad school (GI Bill can cover it all that if you save your money and budget everything out, pull all the strings, and go to a cheaper state to do this. I would say skip the LVN unless you can just test out and grab that right away and use it to work SNF for some money while getting the rest done.

    I think at a minimum we are going to see Obama push more states to allow corpsmen to challenge LPN.
  5. Visit  nurse2033} profile page
    3
    Mr. Obama may be many things, but he is not an authority on nursing, nor does he "run" nursing. Laws and regulations regarding nursing are written at the state level, over which the President has no authority. I am for all transition programs that allow partitioners like corpsman, EMTs, paramedics, medics and so on become nurses. These programs should assess what knowledge they have, and add to it the required nursing curriculum.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, llg, and just_cause like this.
  6. Visit  FMF Corpsman} profile page
    0
    mmm333, I think this is all good. It gives those who want to go forward on this career path, a leg up and I see nothing wrong with assisting our veterans, after they've put their lives on the line for our Country, and for you and I to enjoy the freedoms most of us take for granted each and everyday. I don't believe it gives anyone an unfair advantage over anyone else, as everyone is free to join the Military, go to a theater of war and take their chances as to if they survive their enlistment. If they aren't willing to participate, they need to simply attend the college of their choice the old-fashioned way, with student loans, after school jobs, and wait for their name to come up on the waiting list.
  7. Visit  FMF Corpsman} profile page
    1
    Britrn04, Best wishes for your husband when he finally retires, especially as a HS teacher, LOL. I can't imagine, but I guess we all have a calling. I don't know what he is currently doing for the NAVY, but most of us need some sort of bridge training in order to support a smooth transition to the civilian work force. The Military system works quite well as long as it remains within the Military, but the transition just doesn't cut it, there are gaps, whereas in the Military there are redundancies, but spread over several people. I agree that most people are not ready to sit for NCLEX-RN without additional training. If someone wishes to attempt it, they are likely simply foolish, ill prepared, and wasting their time and money. BUT, it might tell them where their strengths and weaknesses lie.
    Britrn04 likes this.
  8. Visit  realmean1} profile page
    1
    I was a Navy Corpsman from 1973 to 1977. When I got out in IL, the only thing I was qualified for was a nursing assistant and/or EMT. But, unlike some of my friends who went into other fields, I sucked it up, did the CNA thing while going for LPN, then worked as an LPN while getting my RN. Unless you were a Corpsman before 1975, which was when they changed the classes, there is no way to understand what a Navy Corpsman did. Everything that a floor RN does, Corpsman did it. Along with serving with the Marines, and as independent Corpsmen on ships. It made it alot easier getting the degree and working at the same time. President Obama doesn't have a clue what a corpsman does. Neither does the rest of the civilain population, so may as well just buckle down and get it done. I also got into the Air National Guard, which paid for books, etc for only 1 weekend a month and 2 weeks/year. Of course that pre-Iraq. Might think differently now. Have I regretted the way I did it? Only when work gets to be bear, then wish I drove a truck for a living.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    1
    Quote from realmean1
    I was a Navy Corpsman from 1973 to 1977. When I got out in IL, the only thing I was qualified for was a nursing assistant and/or EMT. But, unlike some of my friends who went into other fields, I sucked it up, did the CNA thing while going for LPN, then worked as an LPN while getting my RN.
    *** I am happy that not all states take shuch a short sighted view as IL does. Corpsmen and medics are not ready to become RNs. However they shouldn't have to repeat training and as far as I am concerned they should get a leg up when getting into nursing school. I would think advanced placement based on testing them for their knowlage and skills would be appropiate. My state, Wisconsin does recognize corpsmen & medics skills and training in it's technical college system. The University doesn't seem to though.
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  10. Visit  browns0507} profile page
    2
    Quote from Asystole RN
    Watching the Presidential debate tonight and a statement by Obama made my head turn. He was relating a story when a corpsman was stating that he has treated wounded soldiers but when he became a civilian he could not use his training or experience to count towards becoming a nurse (unknown which kind). The corpsman was upset that he had to start his education/training from the beginning.

    Obama stated that the requirements to be a nurse (assumed licensure/NCLEX requirements) should be changed to allow corpsman to become nurses (did not state which kind).

    Any thoughts?
    As a current RN,BSN and a "former Corpsman", I firmly believe that the skill's learned as a Corpsman should be taken into account. I did far more hands on patient care as a Corpsman than as a nurse. However, I also believe that more education than what a Corpsman receives in Corps school is needed to become an RN.
    FMF Corpsman and CountyRat like this.
  11. Visit  unkwm128} profile page
    0
    I think its a good idea if I can sit for the bar exam with my associates degree
  12. Visit  FMF Corpsman} profile page
    1
    mmm333, You are right, it was/is all over the map. I'm certain some of the things I did as a Corpsman back in country would absolutely curl the toenails of even some of today's Nurses, but they were only done as a last ditch effort to save the lives of my Marines. Things were much different back then, some things we did back then were actually considered pioneer techniques and procedures for things done today.
    herring_RN likes this.
  13. Visit  VioletKaliLPN} profile page
    2
    I will say this. Nursing is not just what you can do, the physical skills, but what you know. It is the entire education. Anyone can insert an IV, but do you understand what is happening within the body when it infiltrates, and what to do when that occurs?

    It is not just about what you do, the skills, but the pathophysiology and education.
    herring_RN and CountyRat like this.
  14. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    1
    [QUOTE=VioletKaliLPN;7025063]I will say this. Nursing is not just what you can do, the physical skills, but what you know. It is the entire education. Anyone can insert an IV, but do you understand what is happening within the body when it infiltrates, and what to do when that occurs? It is not just about what you do, the skills, but the pathophysiology and education.[/QUOTE)

    Judging from the number of calls I get from RNs for this very thing I would venture to say many RNs have no idea either.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Nov 10, '12 : Reason: Quote
    FMF Corpsman likes this.


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