staffing on nights - page 2

How many licensed nurses on nights for how many beds? Do you have a supervisor as well? Thanks!... Read More

  1. by   jude11142
    We have a 156 room facility. On night shift, we have 4 licensed staff. We have 5 units and our supervisor(RN)takes one unit. The other 4 are covered with either lpn or rn, many times it's lpns. One of the nurses has to work a "double unit"(60pts)and the other 2 work a 30 pt unit. I'm not quite sure how they determined to have one nurse for 60 except for the fact that those rooms are blended???

    Anyways, that is how the night shift is divided up where I work.

    JUDE
  2. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Dementia unit - 41 patients 1 RN or LPN and 2 CNA's
    Long term unit - 60 patients 1 licensed and 3 CNA's
    Subacute -41 patients 1 or 2 licensed depending on census and 2 CNA's
  3. by   steff_rn1
    We have 90 residents and work with two LPN's and usually 5 CNA's. No supervisor. I am surprised that some places have 1 nurse to 30 or less res. at noc.
  4. by   Blackcat99
    Quote from donmomofnine
    The reason I ask is that we have 90 beds, usually a census of 80, and I have two charge nurses, one supervisor and five nursing assistants. I am trying to cut back to two charge nurses, no supervisor, and am getting a lot of resistance. Our facility is very low key, a couple G tubes, nothing else complicated. They have no treatments and do no resident care, other than checking if an alarm goes off or helping turn residents. I came in on 2 11-7 shifts and saw very little action.
    Wow!!!! No treatments on nights!!! That's amazing!!!! How shocking that you allow your residents to sleep at night!!! That's wonderful!!!! :hatparty:
  5. by   HONEYBEAR
    Quote from donmomofnine
    How many licensed nurses on nights for how many beds? Do you have a supervisor as well? Thanks!

    I work in a 63 bed facility, with 3 nurses and 5 STNA'S....... This does include a supervisor.
  6. by   donmomofnine
    What kind of needs do the residents have at your facility? What do the licensed nurses do all night?
  7. by   CapeCodMermaid
    What do the licensed nurses do? It depends on the floor. On the dementia unit, they do mostly paper work and chart audits. On the long term floor-mostly paper work and chart audits. On the sub-acute floor-IV's, assessing sick patients, lots of PRN pain meds. I worked on 11-7 on the dementia unit one night. It was so dreadfully slow. One patient got out of bed for 3 minutes. The rest of the time, I ran up and down to the subacute floor to do their care plans and MDS's and summaries.
    Last edit by CapeCodMermaid on May 6, '05 : Reason: typo
  8. by   Marnaby
    I work on a 14 bed cardiac stepdown floor. When we are full at 14 we have 4 nurses at night with 1 aide. Right now the census is only at 7 with one pt filling that "stepdown" criteria (she's on dobutamine). There are three nurses at night for the rest of the weekend.

    When a nurse on the floor has a "stepdown" pt she/he can only have a 3 pt assignment (days or nights).
  9. by   night owl
    Quote from donmomofnine
    The reason I ask is that we have 90 beds, usually a census of 80, and I have two charge nurses, one supervisor and five nursing assistants. I am trying to cut back to two charge nurses, no supervisor, and am getting a lot of resistance. Our facility is very low key, a couple G tubes, nothing else complicated. They have no treatments and do no resident care, other than checking if an alarm goes off or helping turn residents. I came in on 2 11-7 shifts and saw very little action.
    On our 60 bed unit with 2 Rn's, 1-LPN and 3-4 CNA's, The Rn's and LPN do paper work, makes out assignments, assists with care, (ie) pulling residents up in bed, turning, and code browns, give PRN meds and a PRN nebulizer tx here and there until medication time at 0500. We have 2 G-tubes also, a few straight catheterizations for PVR's a couple of tx's that are done when we give the residents their meds. Nothing major, just ointment applications. Some times we work with 1 Rn and an LPN until 0600 when another licensed person comes in to assist with meds. If that person doesn't come in, then we split that extra med cart have a cart and a half to do. Having three licensed on for the entire shift really helps in emergency situations. Our nurse practicioner comes in at 0600 and she is a God send, Too bad she's leaving next week. It's pretty much low keyed though, but other nights it seems like you never stop. And when an emergency occurs, it throws you all off so that you're behind with everything and then have to stay over to finish up. We usually get OT when it happens. As far as the supervisor, he/she does the staffing, makes rounds and collects the 24 hour report from each unit, assists in emergencies, gives inservices, checks narcotics once a week on each unit with a licensed and makes rounds with the DON once a month.
  10. by   snowfreeze
    325 bed facility 9 units usually 6 to 8 nurses and 21 aids or more depending on the nurses. Personal care, 16 patients with one aid, 7 dementia units, 28 to 36 patients with 2 aids and one nurse and some can share a nurse if needed but always at least two aids. LTC 60 beds, 2 nurses/4 aids, specialty care 60 beds, 3 nurses/4 aids
  11. by   UnchainedFever
    Quote from michelle126
    48 beds....one RN or LPN. 2 cnas
    I work PRN in a local nursing home. There are 68 patients and 1 RN, 3-4 CNS's.
    It's consistently busy...Too much for 1 nurse....
  12. by   sockov
    And they wonder why there is a nursing shortage!
    I don't think I will ever work LTC again with the poor staffing! I think those residents deserve more nurses and CNA's to not only meet their physical needs, but emotional too. As always.. no time.
  13. by   Otis4DinTN
    We are a 48 bed hospital based skilled nursing unit. Our night shift staffing is currently 4 nurses (either RN or LPN) and 3 aides. We do two routine med passes (sometimes there's an oddly timed med, too) and treatments. After reading all these responses... I'm thankful for what we have!

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