Sick of it!!! - page 2

:angryfire I am desperately trying to get a job in a hospital right now. I just can't stand the NH anymore! Every shift I work, I'm disgusted at the lack of care our residents get. If you get on to... Read More

  1. by   bethin
    I had to interview with the DON and the RN giving nurse aid classes before I could start classes. They asked me questions like am I leader vs. follower, take risks vs. being safe, etc. I was very impressed.....until I actually worked the floor. I HATED HATED HATED it. I worked 3-11p shift and ALL my help from nurses to aides would leave the floor for 30 mins to go smoke. I got so pissed off that I quit and went to a hospital. The hospital also has a LTC facility and I can say those pts. get excellent care. I think the problem with nursing homes is that there are alot of pts. who need alot of care and there isn't enough people looking over them. But then again, nurses shouldn't have to baby sit CNA's. I didn't get in this career to treat other people like dirt.






    Quote from southernlpn
    Please don't ever lose sight of that. I think that the CNA hiring process ought to incorporate a personality test of some sort to help determine who's most fit for the job. I know it's a hard job, but they can't get by with just showing up and getting a check. At least they shouldn't be able to.
  2. by   bethin
    I saw "pulse" and just had to share this. Working in a hospital you think everyone would know how to take vitals with a bp machine and the old fashioned way. An aid walked into a room that had a month old infant with bronchitis. I figured she knew what she was doing since she was a nurse extern. Boy, was I wrong! The aide walked out and asked me what 60 times 4 was because that's the baby's pulse. I jumped out of my chair and on my way to the baby's room I yelled at her to get the charge nurse and peds crash cart. She stopped me and says "Ooops. I mean what's 60x2?" Better, but you still got to count for a whole minute. I cry everytime I see her. She can get into nsg. school and I can't . Hope she doesn't take care of me or someone I love someday!!! Scary.


    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    Oh, lord, I say all the time, that in AZ all it takes to be a CNA is a pulse and no felonies. And the felony thing is negotiable.
  3. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from southernlpn
    Please don't ever lose sight of that. I think that the CNA hiring process ought to incorporate a personality test of some sort to help determine who's most fit for the job. I know it's a hard job, but they can't get by with just showing up and getting a check. At least they shouldn't be able to.
    I agree, they should also receive an education on the responsibilities of the nurses they work with. I've seen it said by more than a few posters on this board that nurses should have to work as a CNA first, how about CNAs shadowing a nurse to at least have some idea of what we do.
    Just a suggestion. We used to have a night shift CNA who was HORRIBLE, would leave residents on rings of dried urine, BM that they'd fingerpainted and put on their faces at the beginning of her shift, leave residents on mattresses that had no linen, I could go on and on. The night nurse would just defend her, so the day shift nurses got the polaroid and took pictures to show the DON. Problem solved, CNA fired and reported to BON.
    Good for you Lovingtheunloved
    I think the problem with nursing homes is that there are alot of pts. who need alot of care and there isn't enough people looking over them. But then again, nurses shouldn't have to baby sit CNA's. I didn't get in this career to treat other people like dirt.
    I agree Bethin, alot of NHs are understaffed and the nurses shouldn't have to babysit CNAs. NO ONE deserves to be treated like dirt. I also hope you get into nursing school soon (big difference between 240 BPM and 120BPM in an infant), don't blame you for being frustated.
  4. by   CapeCodMermaid
    two things---in the first post you said you saw the GTUBE hadn't been flushed. Certainly you don't expect your CNAs to do that?!?
    Secondly-I work in a 142 bed facility...it's the 5th place I've worked, and without a doubt, we have the best CNAs around. Not all of them are good, but the majority of them works hard every day to take really good care of their residents. We had 2 of them "spoken to" by the head of laundry because they change the linen too many times!! Their answer:WE are taking care of these people and the sheets needed to be changed. There are good CNA's and there are quality homes.
  5. by   Nursebaby23
    I have found that the only way to get things done is to raise CANE! After you try to resolve issues diplomatically and it doesn't work, bring out the horns and show that you mean business. If you are a reputable and respectable nurse in LTC, "most" CNAs realize that. Sometimes a nurse has to build a repor and trust with CNAs before they can work together for the common goal: TAKE CARE OF THEIR RESIDENTS!!! If their is poor communication between the nurse and the CNA, it can make the job miserable. A nurse should truly appreciate the CNAs who take their job seriously and do it well. If there are CNAs leaving rings of pee and dried poo, someone should have to authority to fire them on the spot! That is pure neglect.
  6. by   CoffeeRTC
    Yikes.... if you read thru this board you will see many a post on these issues and also know that this doesn't happen everywhere.

    YOu have 2 choices, stay and decide to fight or leave and get a new job.
    They only way things will change is if you have the support of the DON or ADM. Have a sit down with them. I work weekends and hate to come in during the week, but after a few bad ones, you better believe that I make a point to come in and have a 1:1 with the DON. Short staffing is never an excuse for lack of care. Breaks dont' need to happen every 2 hrs for 15-30 minutes and your kids or husband better be bleeding out if they are calling in every 15 minutes needing to talk to you. Everyone knows that I was schooled in the science of urine rings and BM stains so don't even tell me that it just happened:angryfire
  7. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    [QUOTE=CapeCodMermaid]two things---in the first post you said you saw the GTUBE hadn't been flushed. Certainly you don't expect your CNAs to do that?!?
    QUOTE]
    No, my brain was just trying to process everything a little too fast, lol! That's definitely a nurse duty. At the time I was thinking about a resident who gets dilantin and his tube was a pretty red color half way up and the feeding hadn't yet been restarted.
  8. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    I wondered the same thing when the nurses did that, and I honestly don't know about residents being in pics as far as HIPAA is concerned, but I can't imagine there'd be a violation if the resident is not in the picture. Whatever it takes to make sure those people are given the care they deserve. What you are describing is not just neglect, it's abuse.

    And for the record, good care CAN be given when short staffed. It's called busting your ass. At least those CNAs get to go HOME after their shift. Their residents can't.
    I'm sorry but I disagree. Good care cannot be given with a short staff! Where I used to work we had to wash, dry, fold and put away linen in addition to our other duties. we had 4 wheelchairs a night we had to hand wash. In this place, the 7-3 techs did not have to get up any residents because the 11-7 techs had to do it. And guess what, if we were short WE STILL HAD TO! This was a 130 bed facility. With only two techs in the building,
    I had 43 patients to give a bed bath to and comb hair. I certainly did not have time to shave or brush teeth. All I could do was wet a wash cloth and soap it up then wash face, pits and bottoms. Then I had to take out trash and dirty linens. On the rehab hall, I had patients who could use bed pans and they stayed on them for 30+ minutes because I could not get back to them. I had was required to do this and even though there are agency's on every corner, no one cares to call them to help us. Now, I don't consider having a half assed bedbath and not getting my teeth in and all that good care. Plus I had no time to talk to these residents or answer their questions. The night after we were short, I called my DON and told her while she was sleeping, I was having a night from hell! I quit immediately. I have never had such a terrible time at work. And to top it all off, even with me having to start getting people up at 4:00 am( which I know can't be right) I still didn't give the care I wanted to, but what made it so bad is I only had 3 people left to get up, and all day shift kept saying was such and such is on the call light and for me to change people ( of course they are wet,it's 730 and I got them up at 4:00 !) They made me get up the other three people and I did not leave till 830. I'm sorry but that is a bs way of working and as I said I quit the next day. I'm sorry for my grammer, this was written after my 12 hor shift at a much better nursing home. Really, if you were short and had maybe 20 people to care for, or even 30 I'd say you could still give accetable care, but not 43 and not with no break. We are not machines!
  9. by   CoffeeRTC
    ummm that picture you just gave definatly isn't right. Why does 11-7 have to give bed baths on every one? What the heck is 7-3 doing. When did the residents sleep? That staffing ratio and list of duties is obsurd for an 11-7 shift. Cleaning a wheel chair is not a priorty over resident care and I'm sure a state surveyor would agree with me on this one....also the quality of life...sleep schedule thing. They are big time into this in our area.

    BTW...getting people washed, dresses and up at 4 am is abuse. I know you have to do what you have to do to get done, but get real...administration should have their buts in a sling over this one.
    Last edit by CoffeeRTC on Oct 3, '05
  10. by   Plagueis
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I'm sorry but I disagree. Good care cannot be given with a short staff! Really, if you were short and had maybe 20 people to care for, or even 30 I'd say you could still give accetable care, but not 43 and not with no break. We are not machines!
    I totally agree. It is impossible to give quality, time-consuming care to residents, especially if they are completely dependent on care, if the nursing home is short staffed. I don't know how you can give acceptable care to 20 or 30, especially on the 3 to 11 shift. I have had as many a 13, and I almost went over the end of the shift, in order to get them all into bed, so I can't even imagine having to put 20 to bed in the same amount of time. One CNA for 43? C'mon! The lack of staffing hurts the residents, and it seems like that many people who become CNAs don't realize that residents need care on the weekends, as well as holidays. (These seem to be the times that CNAs call out.) If they don't want to work the weekends, then lthey should look for another job that doesn't require work on those days.
  11. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I'm sorry but I disagree. Good care cannot be given with a short staff! Where I used to work we had to wash, dry, fold and put away linen in addition to our other duties. we had 4 wheelchairs a night we had to hand wash. In this place, the 7-3 techs did not have to get up any residents because the 11-7 techs had to do it. And guess what, if we were short WE STILL HAD TO! This was a 130 bed facility. With only two techs in the building,
    I had 43 patients to give a bed bath to and comb hair. I certainly did not have time to shave or brush teeth. All I could do was wet a wash cloth and soap it up then wash face, pits and bottoms. Then I had to take out trash and dirty linens. On the rehab hall, I had patients who could use bed pans and they stayed on them for 30+ minutes because I could not get back to them. I had was required to do this and even though there are agency's on every corner, no one cares to call them to help us. Now, I don't consider having a half assed bedbath and not getting my teeth in and all that good care. Plus I had no time to talk to these residents or answer their questions. The night after we were short, I called my DON and told her while she was sleeping, I was having a night from hell! I quit immediately. I have never had such a terrible time at work. And to top it all off, even with me having to start getting people up at 4:00 am( which I know can't be right) I still didn't give the care I wanted to, but what made it so bad is I only had 3 people left to get up, and all day shift kept saying was such and such is on the call light and for me to change people ( of course they are wet,it's 730 and I got them up at 4:00 !) They made me get up the other three people and I did not leave till 830. I'm sorry but that is a bs way of working and as I said I quit the next day. I'm sorry for my grammer, this was written after my 12 hor shift at a much better nursing home. Really, if you were short and had maybe 20 people to care for, or even 30 I'd say you could still give accetable care, but not 43 and not with no break. We are not machines!
    Wow. I guess my idea of short staffing is different, because the most I've ever had was 16. Apparently I'm pretty lucky. You're right, 43 is insane. And for the record, I work days, and our night shift is supposed to get up as many as they can, but for crying out loud, when you've got 16 to get up by yourself, you can only do what you can do. I appreciate the work our night staff does.
  12. by   barefootlady
    This sounds like a nightmare, 20 to 30 patients is just too much. Did you call the DON, Administrator at midnight and request them to come in and help? I would have. What did day shift do? I hope this place was reported to the state and is closed for abust and neglect now.
  13. by   Julie frm Dallas
    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    They are human beings. God made them, they deserve love and respect and dignity. How many of them were teachers, veterans, docs, nurses, moms, dads, entrepreneurs, people who have contributed to society, and deserve to live their final days as comfortably as possible. I swear, I'm going to get a BSN just to teach a CNA class.

    How true. It is so refreshing to read your post. After having most people turn their nose up at me after I tell them what I do for a living, I must admit that until recently, I've been ashamed of my job. CNAs will always have to deal with family members/administration etc. who treat us like we are the dregs of society just because our job is far less glamorous than theirs. (In their eyes) Yes, changing soiled diapers and feeding pts. is the majority of my job, but ppl don't see the other part of it - the part that makes me proud - loving these people, seeing the appreciation and thanks in their eyes after you've cleaned them up and done these little things for them. We are sustaining them every bit as much as a doctor or nurse, just in a different manner. I hope that if any CNAs read this and are having the same negative ideas about their job that I had, they will consider what I've said and realize that our jobs are EVERY bit as needed/appreciated by the residents (the ones who matter) as much as the charge nurse. I am in school taking nursing pre-req's, and forever I told myself I'd never work in LTC when I graduated, but I think I have changed my mind as of late.

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