I just need some advice on this one, and it's making me NERVOUS. - page 2

by sherabear

8,557 Views | 52 Comments

I am a new grad LPN. I started my very first nursing job last week, and have been orentating since last Wednesday. On the wing that I will be working on, I have 1 resident in particular that asks for PRN Ativan at least four... Read More


  1. 0
    Wow that's kinda harsh punishment. I've told a pt that I'm giving pain medicine when in fact I was just pushing 5cc of NS. But that was because the MD didn't want to order iv pain medicine. It was a last resort and miraculously that solved her problem lol.
  2. 0
    [QUOTE=Nurse_;7212422
    So why is she taking the Ativan? Is it for anxiety? Do you think she's anxious? If not, you have to explain to her. That's your job. If she needs a stronger dose, you have to rely that to the physician. The doctor does not know how much ativan she takes, and its your job to follow up on that. Is her anxiety getting worse? If it is, does she need a better medication to manage it?

    Just because other nurses openly admit it to you, it doesn't mean they will risk their license to openly admit that in court. You have to protect yourself because, guess what... you are the newbie, it's easier to get rid of you.[/QUOTE]

    If things go well for me, I am going to talk to the doctor about possibly scheduling it BID or TID depending on what he thinks; she asks for it like clockwork, regardless of whether or not she actually needs it, which in my honest and professional opinion, she does not. She is a higher needs resident and has her call light on at least 6-8 times per hour, which definitely indicates a need for human contact, and I have stayed in her room on more than one occasion, even making her forget that she requested the ativan, which is why I've only administered it once. I think she relies on the idea of the ativan more than the effects of it...that doesn't excuse the whole not administering it thing, I know. And I've had the last two days to have my heart pound and think about the outcome, and really regret being a lemming. I don't agree that she needs it. But like you say...it's not my call. It's the doc's and her's.
  3. 3
    Good luck with it, and thank you for posting this. I'm not a nurse yet, but seeing things like this helps me learn from the lessons of others instead of having to fall and scrape my knee myself.
    tnmarie, anotherone, and DawnJ like this.
  4. 9
    I don't know,just a thought here but why not just give it q6h if it is safe to do so. Who knows maybe after a few days her "neediness" and on the call light 6-8 times an hour will decrease. Of course I don't know this person or other assessment information re her but if its ordered and safe, why lie. At least giving q6, she wouldn't have to ask and this could free all of you up to do other things. I treat these types of meds just like pain.. Even though I can't see it, doesn't mean its' not there.
    Hygiene Queen, CrissiQ, tnmarie, and 6 others like this.
  5. 6
    what was wrong with just giving her the ativan? So unprofessional I can't believe people actually do this. No integrity.
    soxley, dream'n, Bortaz, RN, and 3 others like this.
  6. 10
    Quote from squatmunkie_RN
    Wow that's kinda harsh punishment. I've told a pt that I'm giving pain medicine when in fact I was just pushing 5cc of NS. But that was because the MD didn't want to order iv pain medicine. It was a last resort and miraculously that solved her problem lol.
    You think this is funny?

    You are proud of this?

    You think this was a right thing to do?

    I am sure your licensing board thinks otherwise.
  7. 5
    Quote from squatmunkie_RN
    Wow that's kinda harsh punishment. I've told a pt that I'm giving pain medicine when in fact I was just pushing 5cc of NS. But that was because the MD didn't want to order iv pain medicine. It was a last resort and miraculously that solved her problem lol.
    Yikes. Not good. Not only is it deceptive to the patient, but if it ever came to light that a patient claimed you gave him/her narcs, and it somehow gets discovered that they did not, in fact, get any narcs, you could be under suspicion for diversion.

    Some of the things people admit to here boggles my mind.
    tnmarie, Ruas61, roser13, and 2 others like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from klone
    Yikes. Not good. Not only is it deceptive to the patient, but if it ever came to light that a patient claimed you gave him/her narcs, and it somehow gets discovered that they did not, in fact, get any narcs, you could be under suspicion for diversion.

    Some of the things people admit to here boggles my mind.
    Look at a thread she started about a coworker and narcotic restrictions.
  9. 2
    First, please use correct grammar. You orient to a position not "orientate". It is difficult to read posts when I am not able to see past the usage of the English language.
    JessiekRN and NurseDirtyBird like this.
  10. 6
    As discussed numerous times "orientate" is actually a real word and in this case is being used correctly. It seems to be a regional thing In the US and is common across Canada and the UK.
    Gold_SJ, morte, JDZ344, and 3 others like this.


Top