Why aren't there more nursing programs in your State !!!! - page 4

Everyone knows that there is a nursing shortage. However, there are not enough programs designed or catered to the people who really wants to go to school for nursing. To me there should be more... Read More

  1. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from FutureNurse35
    My school would love to offer more nursing classes, but who is going to teach? The nurses can make more money working as a staff nursing in a hospital, why would they want to teach?
    This is why a change is needed. Better overall incentives for students, instructors and nurse. Only we can make such a change come about. Like Freedom42 stated, maybe alumni's need to be formed. Maybe the governor needs to be more aware of our current plight.
  2. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from JBudd
    In our local ADN program, a BSN can teach clinicals, titled "instructor". The community college won't pay nursing instructors any more than any other instructor at the CC (math tutors etc. ).

    I am working on my master's, and would take a pay cut of at least half to work there, as opposed to my ER job with my BSN.

    There have been times we had more students in the ER than staff nurses, 3 from the Airforce, 4 from CC, at least 2 from a different school. Makes it hard to give everyone one nurse to follow!
    Your first comment is very true. Currently CC's have nurses who are working on advancing their current degree ( MSN/BSN) teach clinical at base salary. There is no differential category.

    It is sad about having more students than nurses especially in the ER!!!!
  3. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from FutureNurse35
    My school would love to offer more nursing classes, but who is going to teach? The nurses can make more money working as a staff nursing in a hospital, why would they want to teach?

    I plan on working in student -nurse education some day. I also know that unless one of my other business vebtures pays off early one, I will probably never work full time for any college.

    Two shifts a week at a local college and I am near my professor salary? Sad.

    I am a vey frugal person and it certainly has never been about money for me. Fancy house, cars and designers purses are not my thing.

    Still, you need money to take care of your needs. I would also like to properly take care of my parents and older relatives in years to come. That takes funds.
    Last edit by sunnyjohn on Jan 1, '07
  4. by   Freedom42
    Quote from SA2BDOCTOR
    However, if all nurses see the importance of uniting together for better salaries, better programs, better working condition, it will make our letters have a stronger impact. After all we are just the students. We are not the nursing generation becoming extinct. (retirement age)
    Right on. Organization is the key to many of the challenges facing nursing. If nurses want to improve working conditions at any level, they've got to organize. Though I am only a student, I have been struck by how low a profile nurses have in my home state.
  5. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Freedom42
    Interesting thread. Here are my two cents:
    ....

    I disagree that there's a shortage of instructors with master's and Ph.Ds, but there is a shortage of the political will to come up with the money to pay them competitive salaries. ....

    One poster questioned why a nursing professor earns 47K and a law professor 100k. Since that's exactly the situation at the public university I attended, I did some digging. What I found was that the law school has an extremely well-organized alumni association that raises at least $350,000 a year in private contributions and that has established an endowment in excess of $2.2 million. The interest from that endowment allows the law school to offer competitive salaries. When I go back to school in January, I intend to find out if this has been considered at the nursing school and what it would take to get a similar campaign established, either by alumni, students or their supporters.

    In the meantime, I've written a letter to the governor pointing out the salary disparity and the problem it poses for students who can't get into nursing programs. I hope my classmates will do the same. The time spent is an investment in our futures.

    I agree with posters who suggest that the situation will change when the public feels the pain.
    Very interesting.

    Let me also supply another theory.

    I also believe that nursing professors are paid less because nursing is still partially seen as a "pink collar" job and nurse Phd's, MSNs and advanced degree nurses apart of 'the pink-collar ghetto'.

    Jobs are seen this way when they are dominated by women.

    Even in our progressive society this thinking exists because the public still has no real idea what nurses do. The technical skill needed to manage today's hopital patient is not translated.

    As more men enter the profession and as more people (men and women) continue to see nursing as an important professional choice professor salaries (and chances to raise huge endowments) will increase.
    Last edit by sunnyjohn on Jan 1, '07
  6. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    I am the same way. You need funds to take care of business. Tho money is not everything..you cant get very far in life w/o it.
  7. by   sunnyjohn
    Women traditional make 7cents for every $1 a man makes. I have noted informally that even male nurses tend to edge out female nurses over time with regards to pay issues.

    It's a trend you can even see on this board and in the journals.
  8. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    Very interesting.

    Let me also supply another theory.

    I also believe that nursing professors are paid less because nursing is still seen as a "pink collar" job and nurse Phd's, MSNs and advanced degree nurses apart of 'the pink-collar ghetto'.

    Jobs are seen this way when they are dominated by women.

    Even in our progressive society this thinking exists because the public still hass no real idea what nurses do. The technical skill needed to manage today's hopital patient is not translated.

    As more men enter the profession and as more people (men and women) continue to see nursing as an important professional choice professor salaries (and chances to raise huge endowments) will increase.
    I have never heard the term "pink collar" jobs before now. Did you create that :spin: term.

    I do agree tho, our society still holds the norms that men are the leaders etc. Hence as men continue to "deviate from their role" and enter the nursing profession be it as a instructor or a nurse. We might see a change financially.

    I made this comment because a nurse was always been viewed as a female role and not a male.
  9. by   SA2BDOCTOR
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    Women traditional make 7cents for every $1 a man makes. I have noted informally that even male nurses tend to edge out female nurses over time with regards to pay issues.

    It's a trend you can even see on this board and in the journals.
    Is that a factual statement " Women traditional make 7cents for every $1 a man makes" ????
  10. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from SA2BDOCTOR
    I have never heard the term "pink collar" jobs before now. Did you create that :spin: term.

    I do agree tho, our society still holds the norms that men are the leaders etc. Hence as men continue to "deviate from their role" and enter the nursing profession be it as a instructor or a nurse. We might see a change financially.

    I made this comment because a nurse was always been viewed as a female role and not a male.
    Naw, I learned it in a "Women in Sociology" class in undergrad. The professor was a older woman who started out her professional career an RN.

    She would proudly show students photos of her in her cap and regal you with stories of her days as a young RN. Her classes were always packed with students of all majors, especially pre-nursing. She was working hard to debunk the myth of women's work and always encouraged the future nurses to take pride in their profession.

    I think she considered herself a new feminist with the idea that nursing and teaching and stay at home motherhood impowered women.
  11. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from SA2BDOCTOR
    Is that a factual statement " Women traditional make 7cents for every $1 a man makes" ????
    Opps I meant 70cents.

    It's a statictic you often here. I do think the gap is closing, but there is still a gap.
  12. by   Freedom42
    Quote from sunnyjohn
    I also believe that nursing professors are paid less because nursing is still partially seen as a "pink collar" job and nurse Phd's, MSNs and advanced degree nurses apart of 'the pink-collar ghetto'.

    Jobs are seen this way when they are dominated by women.
    I agree whole-heartedly. I've been trying to confirm salary disparities among various academic specialties -- law, engineering, business, etc. -- but have yet to get my hands on a line-item budget that shows me individual wages. My gut says sexism is a factor.

    I also suspect that professors who earn significantly more than nursing professors are those who essentially teach people how to turn a profit. It's a lot easier to make a case and secure funding for university programs when the business sector is demanding well-educated employees who'll in turn generate income taxes and other revenue. Those businesses often make financial contributions to ensure that educational programs supply them with that work force.

    Does anyone know of companies (e.g., hospital corporations, pharmaceuticals, insurance) that make contributions to nursing schools? I'm looking for ideas. Another classmate is monitoring our Legislature's Appropriations Committee. We hope to advocate for our school at hearings when the budget comes up.
  13. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Freedom42
    ....
    I also suspect that professors who earn significantly more than nursing professors are those who essentially teach people how to turn a profit. It's a lot easier to make a case and secure funding for university programs when the business sector is demanding well-educated employees who'll in turn generate income taxes and other revenue. Those businesses often make financial contributions to ensure that educational programs supply them with that work force.

    ...
    VERY INTERESTING!!!

    So nurses need to be seen by hospitals as assets and not liabilites to capital.... Hmmm.... Sounds like we need and image overhaul.

    Making the case that skilled patient advocates (nurses) increase profit margins and are better for the bottom line (than say,fancy lobby fountains that sing) should not be too hard. Turn your largest employment group into a windfall.

    Competitive pay + plesant working environments + increased peer (nursing) input = Good NURSES =Increased profits $$$$

close