Why are you REALLY going into nursing? Honest answers please. - page 23

Ok, I'm a bit frustrated with all of these posts telling us that we shouldn't go into nursing because we need a job and steady income. Sure, I do like to help people, but I need a steady job even... Read More

  1. by   loulou42
    Concerning your question, honestly i do believe that it is a cetain type of person that takes on a nursing programme, you have to be above all interested in trying to maintain human life and put yourself second in the equation. People that consider money as the first issue should in my oppinion go and see a careers adviser to put there skills to better use. Nursing salary is adequate but not enough to live the high life on. Job satisfaction is the reason why i became a nurse, caring for other people and not just your immediate family. I believe that life is very preciouse and that everyone has the right to a healthy life through education and someone who has the caring ethic. Ovecourse i understand that people need to work to sustain a living for themselves and there families, but nursing is not a career that is selfless and should never be as we would then go down the road of no return.
  2. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I'm applying to yours w/o reading all of the rest b/c I liked your added comment. lol

    The only reason I have worked any at all in the last 12 years was for insurance, and my dh has insurance through his job now, so I haven't worked in several years.

    However things are getting more expensive, and the employers are getting more greedy, so hi ho, hi ho, it's back to school I go. LOL

    Actually, I have always wanted to be in the medical field. My first interest, and only interest up until my senior year of high school was to become a plastic & reconstructive surgeon. During my senior year reality hit, and I knew I could not go to school for another 10 years, and I really didn't know if I had a steady enough hand to do that.

    I thought about my options, thought about my family members being nurses, and realized that is where I belong. Heck, who knows, I may end up being an OR nurse.

    I will never be happy until I have accomplished my dream. The money is a greatly appreciated added bonus! I know my family will have a better life financially, with mom and dad working.

    Good luck to you all in nursing school. I hope to be joining you soon!!!!


    Quote from Truly_Blessed
    I need a job, and a steady income. Seriously. **Anyone who says different isn't telling the whole truth. Of course i want to be a nurse, I have wanted to do this since I was 14. But when it comes down t it, one of the main reasons I am going to school now, is for some steady income. I have a kid and I need the benefits. People complain how $30,000 or $40,000 a year isn't making enough, but to me, that's a hell of alot of money, compared to the $15,000 I was making a year at a physicians answering service. That's my honest answer. And yep, I am aware that I will earn every penny of that $30,000 I will make, and sometimes will feel like it's not enough for what I do...but it will still be more than what I had before... I know what I am getting myself into.

    ** people who need a good job because they have a family to support, and are not furtunate enough to have a spouse that makes good money.(updated for the posters getting all huffy about my statement) Chill out.
  3. by   SandraJean
    I decided I wanted to be a nurse when I was 6 years old. Sounds kind of sappy, I know, but nursing was meant for me. I love taking care of people. I don't need to work, my husband is an excellent provider, so money is not my primary motivation. However, if one does need the money, it's not a bad profession.
  4. by   NurseRock
    I have always wanted to be a nurse. I can remember dreaming of it since the age of 5. I did get accepted to the nursing program at Russell Sage College in 1978. I got confused with a five letter word....PARTY ....instead of STUDY. I did not do well and dropped out. At 43 I knew something was missing in my life..I have wonderful children and a great husband. I was working in banking at the time and I knew it was time for a career change. My husband and I talked about me going back to school part time. Thankfully after 1 1/2 yrs I got accepted into the Nursing program at SCCC. Here I am living my dream and hoping to make it a reality. I am in my first semester of the nursing program and doing okay so far. Good luck to all!
  5. by   wonderbee
    Why nursing? I've always seen myself as a nurse. I like the science behind it. It's as close to medicine as I'm gonna get. I like the different facets and opportunities that nursing offers. I like that nursing can take me anywhere in the country I want to go. Of course I like helping people but then again, so did Mother Theresa who didn't go to nursing school. I'm no Mother Theresa. I need an income. Nursing is no deep pocket but it will do.
  6. by   nurse_ange1
    I was at a point in my life in which I was ready to get a career instead of just a job. I always loved the science and math courses in school. I had wanted to be a teacher since I was in second grade, and then in high school I realized that maybe it wasn't worth the trouble for the amount of pay. Life being what it is, I took a detour in my life plans and wansn't ready to go back to school until I was 20. Since then I had had two private jobs caring for 2 different elderly individuals who required assistance with ADL's. When it came time to pick a career, I choose nursing for the following reasons
    1) I would always have a job no matter where in the world I worked.
    2) As a nurse, I would constantly be teaching my patients and family members. (and other students/nurses)
    3) I wanted a job which would provide me a means to be independent if I choose to be.
    4) Opportunities to experience the joys and hardships of the human experience in many different settings.... if I was ever bored with an area I know I can find something new and challenging.

    Did I think I would love it so much that I could no longer define myself without thinking in nurse terms? No. I love what I do, and its the small things that occur between nurse and patient that are the rewards.
  7. by   ICRN2008
    I earned my first bachelor's degree in Clinical Laboratory Science, and I am currently working as a medical technologist. Six months out of school, I knew that I wouldn't be happy with this job for the rest of my career. I didn't have any patient contact, and the only way I could move up the ladder was to go into management. I considered a number of possibilities and ruled them out because:

    1) Grad school for biology: I would be in the same situation I am now, stuck in the lab all day every day.

    2) Medical school: Too many years of school, and I would like to have kids before I'm thirty and actually be able to spend time with them.

    3) Physician's assistant: You always have to work under a physician, and there's really no place to go with your degree if you want to move up.

    4) Public health: It's difficult to find a job, and you spend a large part of your day in an office. The pay isn't great either.

    Ultimately I decided on nursing, and I'm currently in an accelerated BSN program. I plan on going to grad school to get my master's (adult nurse practitioner), and some day I might even go back for my Ph.D. I see nursing as a field where I can really make an difference in people's lives, and I'm looking forward to my new career.
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from Truly_Blessed
    I need a job, and a steady income. Seriously. **Anyone who says different isn't telling the whole truth.
    Sure I want a steady income. But that is why I am not going into nursing. I do not think nursing pays well anyway (for what you do and how hard you work). I have been a CCMA-C for over three years now. I went into it so I could see if I liked the medical field without spending 4 or more years getting there to only find out I should have gone with my second choice, law. I love the medical field. I love helping people and making a difference in their lives; even if it is a small one. I knew after working less than a year I wanted to go into nursing. The doctor I was working for was always telling me "you would make a great nurse, don't waste your tallent here" even before I was able to afford to go back to school. When I saw my mother-in-law give birth to her twins, I fell in love. I started reading books on midwifery and birth story books containing midwife deliveries. I did get a "calling". I want it so bad I would do it for free, and plan to do some home birth for simple trade work for Amish and Mennonite women. I want to be able to help women inside and outside the hospital. I am passionate about birth and want to have the goal of helping woman to trust their bodies to know to do what they were designed to do. I do not see how any one can go into nursing for the money and last…or at least be happy.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from BSNDec06
    I considered a number of possibilities and ruled them out because:

    3) Physician's assistant: You always have to work under a physician, and there's really no place to go with your degree if you want to move up.
    And as a nurse you don't work under a physician?

    Even if you're an NP, you often have to practice under an MD's license to some extent in most states.

    Not sure I'm following your logic here.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Oct 15, '05
  10. by   wonderbee
    Quote from lizz
    And as a nurse you don't work under a physician?

    Even if you're an NP, you often have to practice under an MD's license to some extent in most states.

    Not sure I'm following your logic here.

    I hope I'm not working "under" a physician. In the hospital setting, I work with physicians, physical therapists, respiratory therapists, etc. as part of a team. Maybe in a doctor's office a nurse would work for a physician. In Florida, a nurse practitioner practices under his/her own license and no other.
  11. by   ICRN2008
    Quote from lizz
    And as a nurse you don't work under a physician?

    Even if you're an NP, you often have to practice under an MD's license to some extent in most states.

    Not sure I'm following your logic here.

    In my state, nurse practitioners can practice independently.
  12. by   xxlilkacixx
    The whole truth of why I'm becoming a nurse is because I want to help people. Not only that, I am good talking to people and I feel that with patients having to go through some uncomfortable situations I will be able to make it just a little bit easier for them. Of course the salary and job security is a great perk, but it's not a good enough reason to motivate you through 2-4 years of schooling and a life long career. Also, it's unfair to a patient to have a nurse that isn't truly interested 100% in their well being.
  13. by   shyone2005
    i was in it for the money of course and also helping the elderly.. now, i;m not even sure if it's all worth it... i wish i took a different path... i just started and i feel like quitting already... is that even a normal feeling?? did anyone in here feel like this too when they just started??? it is a secure job however, but i would rather do something else than this.. but now, i feel like i have no choice because too many people are depending on me... otherwise, i would have called it quits...

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