I've Been Arbitrarily Dismissed By My Instructor From The Nursing Program... - page 2

I am a fourth semester student set to graduate in May (2007). Just today, my instructor dismissed me from the program for what she claims was "unsatisfactory" performance in clinicals. I've had her... Read More

  1. by   tencat
    Don't forget to document with whom you've spoken, the time you spoke with him/her, and the jist of the conversation. I agree that this sounds like a miscommunication error.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from moongirl
    the types of questions you should be asking? "Please show me documentation of where I failed to meet standards" " what are your grounds for dismissal" " I would start there. Why wont the director of the prgram talk to you? I find it hard to believe that they could toss you this close to gradaution without a valid reason.

    you must always follow the chain of command. You did go to the program director, now the next step is the Dean, and they should have to set you up with a meeting of the appeals committee, which will include the Director of your program being in attendance.


    Good advice.

    I'm finding it hard to understand you didn't get any reasons why other that "you're out of here, goodbye".

    Surely you're entitled to an explanation.

    Good luck.
  3. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from adoremi125
    thanks for the replies! this particular instructor seems to have a history of this. what she has done to me is not unprecedented. i've gone to the director of nursing. she won't even look into it. i have to do something. i just don't know what. is anyone familiar with educational codes or an instructor? how is being arbitrary about this type of situation right? what types of questions should i be asking? please advise!!
    it sounds like you did not talk to the instructor... i understand that you are frustrated and angry, but if i am correct this was a big mistake. i believe if you had spoken to him/her first, you may have a leg to stand on.

    most instructors inform everyone that he/she will fail a student and documents the reasons for failing the student. so it does not surprise me that the director did nothing because he/she probably knew of your case before you walked into the door.

    talk to your instructor asap and ask him/her why you were failed and to please give you the documentation with feedback. i am sure the director has already seen the paper work and agrees with your instructor because they believe that there is a valid reason for your failure. in the case you were failed for an invalid reason, then you can talk to the director or whomever above them with documented proof.

    by the way, i do not know your pain but i know that there is hope! there are many many many threads on this board of people who have failed, tried to fight the system, and who are no longer nursing students (and have little hope of ever becoming nurses). on the other hand, there are people who accepted the failure, fixed his/her problems, and were able to return the following semester or year. today they are nurses or on his/her way like nursedaddy2006 who hangs out on the male nursing student forum. maybe you can pm him and show him this thread and get some advice from someone who has gone through what you are going through now! gl....
  4. by   Leda
    All accredited nursing programs are required to have published and accessible grievance/complaints and appeal procedures. Therefore this information should be available to you in your student handbook. As suggested in an earlier post you need to find this policy and follow it to the letter. If you are having difficulty accessing this contact your academic advisor for help with this process. You have the right to file a grievance and appeal this decision. If you are denied this right by the nursing program, take it up the appropriate college chain of command. As a last resort contact your board of nursing, they approve the nursing program and my sense is they would not be pleased to find out the nursing program does not allow student due process.
  5. by   AirforceRN
    I know you are getting a lot of different opinions here and I hope this gets figured out for you. Of course...I'm going to give my opinon too...
    Follow the chain of command. Going right to the very top of the school is going over people's heads and people with power HATE that. Work your way up until you get a response you are satisfied with.
    In my school we have to be told we are going to fail, fill out a learning plan with our instructer and then have at least 2 weeks to correct our problems before they can fail us. Makes sense to me...
  6. by   CRNI-ICU20
    I would not hesitate to put down in writing all the events of that meeting.
    Then I would request a meeting with the Dean of Students, and maybe the Chancellor of the school. If this school receives federal funding for higher education, I would research whether or not they followed their own policies....ie gave you adequate grievance avenues, etc. They cannot take a studen't money, ie via federal grants and loans, and then right before you finish, say, "oh oops...you just don't make the grade." This professor? has to document your progress...has to have written and verbal interventions all documented, and co-signed by you that says you will comply or improve or whatever....what she did holds some very serious repercussions....I do think there are instances where students have successfully been re-instated and allowed to graduate. If you get nowhere with the Dean....I would contact my State Senator, or even the US Senator from your state.
    If the school did not follow their own policies on your dismissal from school, then they are liable....and could lose funding and their accreditation.
    I hope you are able to reconcile this....
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    you need to act quickly because rejecting the right to take a test your grades will reflect that
  8. by   jjhorta
    Hey..sorry to hear about this. It actually happened to a few friends of mine this semester. Your nursing program should have saved your clinical evals from previous semesters. You should be able to review this and see if there is anywhere that it is documented your "unsatisfactory" clinicals. Definately appeal it. I went to the head provost of my college when I was having problems in the program.
  9. by   jill48
    I would go to the Dean's office; state my case. But I would not be surprised if they take the instructors side. Sorry.
  10. by   Charity
    You may have to give an attorney a call. A call from an attorney to a school often does wonders. I know more than one person who had to go this route while in nursing school.
  11. by   kenzy
    Not Surprised, and have seen this done on the last day of clinical and the day before graduation. The whole point here is time is of the essence for you, and you must act quiclky. I agree with following the chain of command 100%, but unfortunately sometime this does not work and a few toes must be steped on to get this to the right person in a timely manner. If you have already gone over your Instructers head then I would not go back to her, did you go to the chair of your department? or did you go directly to the head Dean? Either way at this point you must demand an appeal ASAP! I would also demand that you be able to attend class, as well as clinicals until this is dealt with so that you do not lose time, I know a girl who was denied the right to attend, she contacted an attorney and he advised her to go anyways and she did, wow were they ever surprised, but said nothing. Of course she was not allowed to perform in clinical because they would not cover her under their license but lost no time. Obviously they feel they are justified in dismissing you so you must go into this appeal prepared. I would have prepared -all of your grades (test, projects,care plans, papers etc. anything that shows your academic progress), all of your evaluations(from past & present Instructors , I would know your attendence history (absences, tardiness, etc). I would also have a copy of any verbal or written warnings. If there was any one incident that you can think of which may have lead to this, document this and have it on hand, along with any reprimanding that followed. If at all possible I would try to get a letter of recommendation from any site that you have done a rotation at, any preceptor to whom you have worked under at those sites, along with any other Instructor that you have done clinical under. I would also know your student handbook inside and out. Stated in this hand book there must be a list of procedures that they must follow, verbal warning, written warning, anything they have done to rectify the situation, academic probation etc. The only way I know of them dismissing someone on the spot is if they placed there Pt. at risk for harm, then that dismissal should have taken place right then, that day until a full investigation had followed. If that was not the case have your ducks in a row and be prepared to fight. They must be justified in a decision like this, and as much as you feel that you are being singled out believe me you are not, this is not the first time they have faught this battle and they definitly know what their doing or hopefully attempting to do. I'm not saying you dont have hope in this matter, but the point is you need to try to figure out why and be prepared. If you are as good of a student as you say you are then fight the system. At this point, So close to graduation I myself would be very professional when presenting this, but would contact ANYONE to whom I thought could help. Also you bet I would contact an Attorney right now if no one was giving me the time of day. Regardless someone has got to talk to you about this at the school its their job, you just need to find whose job it is. Act quickly and good luck to you. Let is know! My prayers are with you!!!
  12. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Keep us updated.
  13. by   llg
    Quote from mba2brn
    by the way, i do not know your pain but i know that there is hope! there are many many many threads on this board of people who have failed, tried to fight the system, and who are no longer nursing students (and have little hope of ever becoming nurses). on the other hand, there are people who accepted the failure, fixed his/her problems, and were able to return the following semester or year. today they are nurses or on his/her way like nursedaddy2006 who hangs out on the male nursing student forum. maybe you can pm him and show him this thread and get some advice from someone who has gone through what you are going through now! gl....
    having served as a student representative on a school's committee for appeals, i whole-heartedly agree with you. if a student enters the discussion with the attitude that "you failed me for no reason," it is usually an indication that they did not understand the reasons and were unlikely to be able to view the situation (and their performance) objectively. if a student entered into discussions with an acknowledgement that there were some performance issues that needed to be addressed, the faculty was usually willing to give them a second chance.

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