I'm not going to lie... - page 3

Some people genuinely annoy me on here, I'm ALL for furthering education but dreading those of us who choose to start with our ADN is complete disrespect. Had my mother been healthier (she has RA and her pain is becoming... Read More

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    Quote from Ackeem
    No difference in practice? no supervision from BSN RNs? are you serious? Not even in salary?
    You might see a somewhat negligible difference in salary (for my area, only a $1-3/hour difference), but that's it. You might have ADNs supervising BSNs. There isn't a difference from a clinical standpoint. We take the same NCLEX, get the same license. There is also not a massive difference in the number of semesters in school, either, depending on what programs you have access to locally. Where I am, there is a 2-3 semester difference. Where the REAL difference comes into play (in the educational respect) is the cost. An ADN where I am would have cost me less than half what the BSN is costing. If there were no pell grants and student loans, I'd be an ADN student right now. (Well, that and the aforementioned support of my husband, who has made all of this possible.)

    I'm curious-- where are you from?
    heartsgal and Orange Tree like this.

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  2. 1
    I also want to say that I've been learning recently that our local ADN grads have historically had better clinical skills, whereas the BSN grads have a better NCLEX pass rate and critical thinking application. I found that an interesting tidbit. So it would seem the community college is presenting real world nursing where as the university is presenting NCLEX nursing.
    stefonee356 likes this.
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    Quote from ixchel
    I also want to say that I've been learning recently that our local ADN grads have historically had better clinical skills, whereas the BSN grads have a better NCLEX pass rate and critical thinking application. I found that an interesting tidbit. So it would seem the community college is presenting real world nursing where as the university is presenting NCLEX nursing.
    Real world nursing doesn't involve critical thinking?
    sharpeimom, KelRN215, and GrnTea like this.
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    Quote from Ackeem
    No difference in practice? no supervision from BSN RNs? are you serious? Not even in salary?
    ADNs take the same test as BSNs. Do your research.
  5. 0
    Quote from BostonFNP

    Real world nursing doesn't involve critical thinking?
    lol no fair taking it that way!
  6. 0
    Quote from QuarterLife88

    ADNs take the same test as BSNs. Do your research.
    I'm going to assume you didn't read the whole thread and respond by saying that this poster said in an earlier post that where they are from there are no ADNs. They only have 4-year programs.
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    I couldn't agree more. I'd also like to point out that an ADN is not "just a 2 year degree" anymore. I still had to take English, math, 2 psych classes, sociology, chemistry, A&P 1-2, micro and a communication course before I could start clinicals. I am all for higher education and I believe everyone should eventually get their BSN, but there is nothing wrong with having an ADN. Most of the ICU nurses at the hospital I work at are ADNs. Yes, it was always better to have more education but ADNs are more than capable of being great bedside nurses. I don't get offended at the idea of higher education. I embrace it. I get offended when people basically say that ALL BSN nurses are going to be better than their ADN co workers and that an ADN makes nursing look bad. I'm working hard for my degree. Just as hard as my bf is working for his BSN. I started at a 4 year university, did all the pre reqs for my BSN but wasn't accepted into the program. The only other BSN schools around would have made me take another 1.5 years of their pre reqs and I would have easily been 60,000 in debt. After I finish my ADN I will have my BSN within a year because I only need 6-7 classes for my BSN through my previous university. I will have my BSN at the same time I would've had it had I gone straight for it, and for a lot less money. So it made sense for me personally. Sure I would've loved to go straight for the BSN, however not everyone can shell out the money
    heartsgal likes this.
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    Oh, and in my area ADNs are still regularly hired in hospitals.
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    I know it's not a popular thought but....I am a firm believer that new entry to practice should be a Bachelor's. I have absolutely no problem with current ADNs; just change the entry of practice for future nurses.
    ♪♫ in my ♥, KelRN215, and GrnTea like this.
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    I too started off with an Associate's (in Science not Nursing) when I decided to go back to school and pursue a BSN. I was a pharmacy tech before I went back to school, so I had the opportunity to save a good chunk of money and I have a good family support system as well. I do not see anything wrong with the way you are thinking, I think it is actually a good way to go and I plan on doing the same route when I decide to get a MSN, as in, I'll wait a bit, work as a BSN for some time, then get it later.

    As for people who think they are better because they have more education under their belt, well they should think about this aspect, becoming a nurse in and of itself, whether ADN or BSN is a hard road and a grand accomplishment, plus, no matter what route you take, there is always an opportunity to get a higher education.

    Good luck to you.
    Last edit by Beautiful Mind RN on Feb 8, '13


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