Buying a car for nursing school

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    Anyone in the predicament that I am in, needing to buying a car for nursing school. Now I live Baltimore county now we do have public transportation but very un - reliable. I have used it or the past 3 years, I must walk 20 minutes to the buss stop and must leave the hours 2 hours early, to arrive my destination on time. Although I'm still attending the same school I took pre - requisites, the clinical sites are far away and will require me to be there at 6.30 am, buses don't start running until 5 am and only god knows how long it would take there. So anyways , I need to buy a car. The only debt I have is credit card , I pay that every month in full. I have been very good with that. My program is ADN, so its not expensive , my father pays for that but even decides not to pay anymore or somethings, I can still afford to pay it myself, by working full over the summer, Plus I have no rent to pay, my mother is allowing me to stay rent free, in anticipation that I will give of huge percentage of my nursing paycheck to her, ( LoL, that's not gonna happen). Anyways did you guys buy new or used? I have been looking at used car, and I have been totally disappointed in my research, all I'm looking for is something that looks decent and more importantly a car that is mechanically okay .Beaters wont work because I need something reliable. Anyways please comment your thoughts below.
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  3. 64 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Well, I DEFINITELY wouldn't suggest you buy new unless it is a very affordable car, you have good credit, and could afford the monthly payments for NO MORE than 3 years. (If you have to finance a car for more than 3 years, you can't afford it.) A used car is a good choice because they are more affordable. I currently drive a 2004 Mitsubishi gallant that has more than 270K. I don't graduate until Dec 2015 and I hope to either trade this car in after I land a job, or drive this car until it doesn't go anymore. Its dependent and it is affordable (paid for in cash so never had a car note.)

    I would even go so far as to suggest maybe purchasing a cash car. $3000-$5000 could afford you a dependable vehicle, even if it doesn't come with the bells and whistles of something brand new. You just want to get from point A to point B and not break the bank doing it.

    Whatever decision you make, just make sure it is financially sound. DO NOT get into something you wont be able to afford through-out nursing school.
    Best of luck!
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    Also, use resources such as autotrader.com or cars.com to aid you on your search
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    The local Toyota dealer here has used cars from trade-ins with <50K miles on them and gives them 1 year guarantees, but also has a relationship with another used car dealer who takes all their GOOD traded-in Toyotas that have 50-100K miles and gives them 1-year guarantees. Toyotas have excellent reliability ratings according to Consumer Reports. If you end up paying a schoche more for one you'll likely make it up in savings.

    Ask at the dealership; be frank, tell them you're not able to buy a new car YET but ask for their help in identifying a reliable used one. They'll probably see you as a future customer, if they're smart. They may also be able to evaluate a used car you might want to buy from a newspaper ad; the seller should be able to give you info on maintenance records and allow an independent eval before you buy.

    And getting an AAA membership is the best investment you can make if you have a used car-- saved me many times when I was a student (before I started buying Toyotas )
    OCNRN63 likes this.
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    Quote from Bea40448
    Well, I DEFINITELY wouldn't suggest you buy new unless it is a very affordable car, you have good credit, and could afford the monthly payments for NO MORE than 3 years. (If you have to finance a car for more than 3 years, you can't afford it.) A used car is a good choice because they are more affordable. I currently drive a 2004 Mitsubishi gallant that has more than 270K. I don't graduate until Dec 2015 and I hope to either trade this car in after I land a job, or drive this car until it doesn't go anymore. Its dependent and it is affordable (paid for in cash so never had a car note.)

    I would even go so far as to suggest maybe purchasing a cash car. $3000-$5000 could afford you a dependable vehicle, even if it doesn't come with the bells and whistles of something brand new. You just want to get from point A to point B and not break the bank doing it.

    Whatever decision you make, just make sure it is financially sound. DO NOT get into something you wont be able to afford through-out nursing school.
    Best of luck!
    Used cars aren't actually as affordable, as they use to be. Most people are selling junk for $3000 - $5000. They're money pits and require lots of mechanical work, I wont have time for that They are some new cars for $16000 - $18000, which i can afford, Plus I have cash saved. Like i said , I'm not looking for anything flashy, even I buy new ,it would probably be a base model Honda civic. Getting used car that is MECHANICALLY GOOD is hard these days especially buying from strangers, most people are selling their cars because its ******. You are speaking from experience of someone who already has a car, I don't have one at all. If you probably buying around this time, your outlook would be different
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    Quote from GrnTea
    The local Toyota dealer here has used cars from trade-ins with <50K miles on them and gives them 1 year guarantees, but also has a relationship with another used car dealer who takes all their GOOD traded-in Toyotas that have 50-100K miles and gives them 1-year guarantees. Toyotas have excellent reliability ratings according to Consumer Reports. If you end up paying a schoche more for one you'll likely make it up in savings.

    Ask at the dealership; be frank, tell them you're not able to buy a new car YET but ask for their help in identifying a reliable used one. They'll probably see you as a future customer, if they're smart. They may also be able to evaluate a used car you might want to buy from a newspaper ad; the seller should be able to give you info on maintenance records and allow an independent eval before you buy.

    And getting an AAA membership is the best investment you can make if you have a used car-- saved me many times when I was a student (before I started buying Toyotas )
    I'm not buying Toyota, although reliable, used Toyota are not cheap. The prices they want for some these corrolas or camry would probably buy a new civic. So that's not an option. Honda have much better compared to the Toyota, plus the Toyota has a high recall rate, and yes I know Honda have their own issues.
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    Quote from Bea40448
    Also, use resources such as autotrader.com or cars.com to aid you on your search
    I have used, most of them are road side dealers who post there or car posted by individuals that are overpriced
    Caribbean Character likes this.
  10. 0
    I bought a new car that was cheap--only 14k. I wanted a car that was under warranty bc I knew that while in school I wouldn't have an extra 1000 dollars laying around to fix it if something went wrong like I anticipated it might on an older used car.

    This worked well for me. I still have the car although I graduated. Now i only wish I had gotten an SUV bc I find that as an RN my schedule is totally unpredictable and I don't feel as safe in my car anymore because it's small and I'm out driving so late.
  11. 1
    Quote from Bea40448
    Well, I DEFINITELY wouldn't suggest you buy new unless it is a very affordable car, you have good credit, and could afford the monthly payments for NO MORE than 3 years. (If you have to finance a car for more than 3 years, you can't afford it.) A used car is a good choice because they are more affordable. I currently drive a 2004 Mitsubishi gallant that has more than 270K. I don't graduate until Dec 2015 and I hope to either trade this car in after I land a job, or drive this car until it doesn't go anymore. Its dependent and it is affordable (paid for in cash so never had a car note.)

    I would even go so far as to suggest maybe purchasing a cash car. $3000-$5000 could afford you a dependable vehicle, even if it doesn't come with the bells and whistles of something brand new. You just want to get from point A to point B and not break the bank doing it.

    Whatever decision you make, just make sure it is financially sound. DO NOT get into something you wont be able to afford through-out nursing school.
    Best of luck!
    I can actually afford a new car,most people that buy new cars now are paying it on average 5 - 6 years.I'm looking to buy a for reliability,something a lot of used car cant provide. I'm getting something I can afford before, during and after nursing . My income can accommodate that so even If I don't land a job after graduation( I graduate decmeber 2015) , I wont have to worry about making payments, If i was to finance it would be only for 2 years. What if you don't find a job after graduation and you car dies?
    Caribbean Character likes this.
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    Quote from schnookimz
    I bought a new car that was cheap--only 14k. I wanted a car that was under warranty bc I knew that while in school I wouldn't have an extra 1000 dollars laying around to fix it if something went wrong like I anticipated it might on an older used car.

    This worked well for me. I still have the car although I graduated. Now i only wish I had gotten an SUV bc I find that as an RN my schedule is totally unpredictable and I don't feel as safe in my car anymore because it's small and I'm out driving so late.
    Just wondering, what kind of car did you buy for 14 k, when did you buy it?


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