Anyone worried about throwing up or passing out? - page 5

Hi, I posted this question on a different thread but I probably should have put it on here. I REALLY want to be a nurse, but I have a history of almost hurling and almost passing out when it... Read More

  1. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    When I was assisting a nurse with a dressing change for a pt. with burns on 75 % of his body I felt light headed, nausea, and I felt like passing out. I had to keep holding on to the bed, to keep from going down. I also experienced the same thing when assisting to put a cathether in an elderly women... all this yellow mucous came out from her genitals. Yuk ! but gotta love.
  2. by   gabriella86
    I am sitting here gagging after reading some of these descriptions. TMI.
  3. by   penelopelp
    I have the same fear because I have a hx of fainting whenever I feel pain. I'm not worried about vomit, I saw a lot of that when I was a teacher. I'm more worried about seeing something that looks painful, or doing something that is painful to a patient. I'm planning on wearing compression hose and eating a full breakfast. I plan on sitting down and putting my head between my legs if I feel faint. I can tell when it's going to happen--I get nauseous, hot, and sweaty before I go down.
  4. by   RNKel
    I didn't think there was any such thing as TMI when it came to nursing practice.
  5. by   gabriella86
    This is true but not when you are eating LoL.
    Quote from Mommy2ThreeSons
    I didn't think there was any such thing as TMI when it came to nursing practice.
  6. by   sweetsmile
    I had a fellow student who had to help a man wipe his butt and he was about to hit the floor. I was doing my best to help him and help the patient I told him one day that will be you needing help so take a deep breath and get in there and help.
  7. by   NeoNurseTX
    I got lightheaded and had to sit down quite a few times in NS (LPs are NOT my thing) but it doesn't really affect me anymore.

    However, if *I* get blood drawn, I'll still have to put my head between mylegs afterwards!
  8. by   PinkPeony7
    This is lame, but oh well. I have been freaked out about ostomies since learning about them in lab. A friend of mine asked me a few weeks ago about how school has been so far and if I had any advice for him (He's starting clinicals soon). I mentioned that I had yet to encounter a patient with an ostomy and that if I graduated in December without the experience of caring for an ostomy I would be a happy camper. So, the following week I start my last round of clinicals on an oncology-palliatve care floor and in three days I have had three patients with ostomies. The first patient had ovarian cancer and the ostomy was to vent gas. The smell that came out of that thing was unreal. It was like the most rancid cabbage smell I have ever known and permeated the entire room. The next patient with a more traditional colostomy was actually easier smell-wise than the first.

    Today I was helping my patient wash up. She had been caring for her ostomy independently, but it looked very full (it was not clear so I couldn't see the contents). I asked if it needed to be changed and she said she didn't think so and that it just full of gas. I figured I'd change the bag anyways. Well, she was wrong. It was chock full of poo, which started going all over her abdomen. Luckily I had a huge stack of washclothes beside me. After mopping it up I actually changed the whole appliance all by myself. The rest of the day I felt like I had conquered a fear and felt fairly confident the rest of the day.

    I totally jinxed myself with my friend, but now ostomies aren't that big of a deal to me. Once you have to confront some poop, blood, or some other "fragrant" fluid, it will be a lot easier the next time.
  9. by   obicurn
    Quote from Jaguar Boy
    It's funny, when I was a kid, I would regularly pass out whenever I was in a hospital. Now I'm ok, I must have had low blood pressure or something.

    As far as odors go, I'm ok with most odors...but I think I'll keep a jar of vicks in my pocket at all times...I'm mostly not squeamish, but watching maggot therapy will probably make my skin crawl. Getting up close and personal with vomit will take some getting used to. I know for sure, suctioning will be no problem, I used to help the nurse's aide suction my former father-in-law. I don't know why my mind does this, but when I look at a full suction container, I get this mental picture of someone drinking it...THAT makes me queasy...gotta work on cognitive redirection there!
    Oh my. Thanks for that visual. I just wretched after I read that. LOL
  10. by   allnurseid
    In the back of my mind I'm thinking I may want to be a wound/ostomy nurse. The first pt I had with c.diff I had to leave the room - almost vomited. I was surprised because smells usually don't cause that kind of reaction. I guess I'll have to carry Vicks around in my pocket too.
  11. by   ginap
    :chuckle OMG! This is great! I am on my last quarter of Medical Assistant School before I start my pre-reqs for the nursing program (if I can get in anywhere!) I was at my externship site and the doctor asked me if I wanted to watch as he removed a peice of rock from a patient's hand. SURE, why not? WOW, hearing the forcepts scratching the rock made me super queezy!!!!!!!!!!! I almost hit the floor. How am I going to handle nursing?????????????????
  12. by   ginap
    OMG! This is great! I am on my last quarter of Medical Assistant School before I start my pre-reqs for the nursing program (if I can get in anywhere!) I was at my externship site and the doctor asked me if I wanted to watch as he removed a peice of rock from a patient's hand. SURE, why not? WOW, hearing the forcepts scratching the rock made me super queezy!!!!!!!!!!! I almost hit the floor. How am I going to handle nursing?????????????????
  13. by   robynnelpnstudent
    One of the girls in my nursing skills class actually just asked that question on Thursday. Here is what the instructor told her. She said, "If you think you're going to throw up, don't worry about it, or else you will. You need to just do the procedure repeatedly and let yourself see that nothing you're doing is bad enough to where you need to be gagging or anything like that." So, anyways, I used to get lightheaded when I saw blood, but ever since working in a hospital and now being in nursing school, it doesn't even phase me anymore. It's just something that you have to deal with and work through. It'll be worth it in the long run, believe me.

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