Write-Ups & Disciplinary Action - page 5

Has anyone ever been written-up or suspended by their place of employment? I received my first write-up today after nine months on the job. I am the type of person who can accept full... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from storm06
    You are all welcome to come and nurse in the great Land Down Under.
    I promise not to be nice to your face and then stab you in the back. I promise that regardless of any mistake u might make you will be listened to with compassion and empathy. I promise not to accuse you of breech of your nursing practice while u are away on your honeymoon. I promise not to write you up for unauthorised use of the computer. I promise not to sack u for spending an extra 10 minutes in the loo because you have worked 10 hours short staffed, underpaid, dealing with demanding paternalistic doctors, dealing with families,,,,, and you really just need to sit and contemplate why u r a nurse in the first place.
    I have never experienced nor to the best of my knowledge worked with anyone who has been written up in the way u guys describe. It sounds just awful, and my empathy to those of you who have gone though it. I made an error a few months ago. There was never any talk of writing me up or reporting me. The nurse manager and staff were very supportive, I was allowed to have a cry, explain what went wrong and then talk about ways to prevent it from happening again. I think if I had someone ranting and raving at me it would have been enough to make me quit.
    Hang in there guys. Remember if it gets to much we can always use more fantastic nurses like yourselves in Australia
    Thank you so very much for listening to our disciplinary nightmares with a compassionate ear. It means a whole lot to me.
  2. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from storm06
    You are all welcome to come and nurse in the great Land Down Under.
    I promise not to be nice to your face and then stab you in the back. I promise that regardless of any mistake u might make you will be listened to with compassion and empathy. I promise not to accuse you of breech of your nursing practice while u are away on your honeymoon. I promise not to write you up for unauthorised use of the computer. I promise not to sack u for spending an extra 10 minutes in the loo because you have worked 10 hours short staffed, underpaid, dealing with demanding paternalistic doctors, dealing with families,,,,, and you really just need to sit and contemplate why u r a nurse in the first place.
    I have never experienced nor to the best of my knowledge worked with anyone who has been written up in the way u guys describe. It sounds just awful, and my empathy to those of you who have gone though it. I made an error a few months ago. There was never any talk of writing me up or reporting me. The nurse manager and staff were very supportive, I was allowed to have a cry, explain what went wrong and then talk about ways to prevent it from happening again. I think if I had someone ranting and raving at me it would have been enough to make me quit.
    Hang in there guys. Remember if it gets to much we can always use more fantastic nurses like yourselves in Australia
    I knew there was a reason I've always loved everything Australian, especially the attitude & the cool accent!
  3. by   Plagueis
    Quote from TheCommuter
    You hit the nail directly on the head. The 2 coworkers who told on me are the facility gossips.

    I can readily admit that my actions went against company policy, but I don't think they warranted a punishment as austere as a final written warning before I'm terminated. After all, my personnel file was completely clean prior to this final written warning, with no previous write-ups or disciplinary action of any sort.
    That is a ridiculous punishment for using the Internet at work. And there were no previous write-ups? Come on! :angryfire I am surprised that you found out who told on you, since I've heard from some nurses/CNAs that when they were written up or reported for anything, they were not told who reported them. I'm sorry again that this happened to you.
  4. by   linzz
    Well I just hope that the person who wrote you up enjoys living in fear because now I'll bet you will be watching this person like a hawk. I guess these people who write up everyone for silly things think that they have an abundance of friends at work. I am so sorry for you. Hope this all ends soon. You deserve better.
  5. by   smarter
    There is a code of conduct that Nurses are to follow, state regs. etc. Use the write up and/or disiplinary action as a BIG learning experience and don't take it personally. None of us enjoy making mistakes or do it intentionally. But, THINGS happen unfortunatly. Remember, we have a liscense to get the job we have and make the money we do. Be mindful in your every day events.
  6. by   weesyanne
    Hey Commuter,
    I have been a nurse for over 20 years and got into really big trouble a few years ago for playing what was a practical joke on a fellow coworker.:trout:
    It happens to the best of us, so please hang in there and don't let them get you down.
  7. by   jeffrey_rn
    Well, I wasn't written up for the "incident" due to the fact that the patient stated I was very nice, but I was called into the boss' office after she received a complaint from an ex-pt who complained that she never received a bath during her 2 day stay. She said she was told by the nurses that they were too busy.

    I admitted that it was possible though I could not recall the pt and thus the event. However, I told the boss that I'm sure if I said it, I WAS too busy with higher priorities and could not get to it. I also told her I regret not being able to do everything for everybody all the time but I could assure her that it would most definitely (and regrettably) happen again and again and again. I then offered her my signature on whatever write-up she required so that I could get back to doing the billions of things I needed to do for my patients in the impossibly short time I had to do them in. She smiled and said, "It's ok. She said you were very nice. Get back to work." Obviously, my boss hasn't lost her memory of what it's like to be a floor nurse.

    I don't know if there are any morals to this story, I just thought this was the right forum to share it in.
  8. by   hollyvk
    Smarter,

    I believe your "chin up, make the best of it" advice is pollyannaish at best. The #1 reason people leave a job is a poor manager, and there are plenty of them to be found in nursing.

    If you work for a governmentally-related employer, you have guarantees of "due process" in evaluating and reviewing your situation. If you work under a union contract, you are usually also guaranteed a more objective process.

    But in "at will" employment anyone can be written up for anything. Yes, human resources usually requires that the manager conforms to the progressive discipline policy, but any motivated manager can work around that to make you look bad. And the only thing worse that a manager with malice towards you is the one who fails to understand the gravity of initiating the progressive disciple process and thus is prone to writing up employees for incidental, non-significant events.

    Your at-will manager can put any sort of half-truth or distortion in his/her write up on you. There really is no effective way to challenge it. Sure you can write your rebuttal, but then it's just your word against the manager's, and administration will almost always side with the manager. So even asking for a human resources review is essentially futile.

    Anyone with an at-will employment situation who feels they have been written up for something that isn't true or valid needs to give SERIOUS thought as to whether they need find another job. It can be a short trip to termination once progressive discipline has been started, and there are a ton of nurses who have found themselves terminated who thought, "It could never happen to me." And it certainly is easier to explain an invalid disciplinary report in one's file than it is a termination.

    And Commuter, why would you want to continue to work with peers who appear to want to do you harm? That's a toxic environment and I STRONGLY suggest you get yourself out of it ASAP.

    HollyVK, RN, BSN, JD

    Quote from smarter
    There is a code of conduct that Nurses are to follow, state regs. etc. Use the write up and/or disiplinary action as a BIG learning experience and don't take it personally. None of us enjoy making mistakes or do it intentionally. But, THINGS happen unfortunatly. Remember, we have a liscense to get the job we have and make the money we do. Be mindful in your every day events.
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from hollyvk
    And Commuter, why would you want to continue to work with peers who appear to want to do you harm? That's a toxic environment and I STRONGLY suggest you get yourself out of it ASAP.
    There's been a very recent update, Hollyvk. One of the people who reported me was recently arrested on an 'accessory to robbery' charge and now sits in jail awaiting trial. Not to sound mean or anything, but I feel vindicated. I don't want to work at this place, but my options are limited.

    What goes around comes around. Every person's day will arrive.
  10. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    There's been a very recent update, Hollyvk. One of the people who reported me was recently arrested on an 'accessory to robbery' charge and now sits in jail awaiting trial. Not to sound mean or anything, but I feel vindicated. I don't want to work at this place, but my options are limited.

    What goes around comes around. Every person's day will arrive.

    Ka-CHING! As the Bible says: "Judgment is MINE".
  11. by   VivaLasViejas
    As an employee, I've been formally written up only once, but have experienced a few verbal 'counseling' sessions that stung worse than anything else.

    That's probably why, as a supervisor, I use the disciplinary process very sparingly and mostly as an educational tool. Usually an informal meeting with the employee is sufficient; I'll make some private notes regarding the conversation to document what was discussed, but otherwise I don't put anything in their file. It's only when the employee doesn't seem to "get it", when the offense is particularly grievous, or worse, purposeful (no-call/no-shows come to mind :angryfire ) that I'll do an actual write-up, listing the infraction(s) and the improvements I expect.

    Sometimes I think I give people too many breaks, but then, I know what it feels like to be on the receiving end when a supervisor has had a bad day, or just doesn't like a person.
  12. by   Miss Ludie
    I have 2 "favorites". One was for using the wrong time clock. I did some research and found the clock number she accused me of using did not exist. The number was a code for supervisor entered missing registrations when the clock on our floor was out of order.

    The second was a bit more serious. It was reported that I had programmed a heparin drip for 10,000 units an hour instead of 1000.

    The night shift then sent for 2 more bags and they apparently also infused at 10,000 units an hour. The pharmacy dispensed them even though it was to be a one time/ one bag order.

    I was fairly sure I had set it right, but mistakes happen don't they?

    The patient's surgery was cancelled and PTTs were ordered. Not elevated.

    The surgeon came and talked to the staff. Another PTT was checked in case the first was in error. Not elevated.

    Surgeon looks at old chart.
    Patient is an ex-Nurse.
    Patient has been admitted many dozens of times that were finally dx as Munchausen's.

    The doc finally determined that if the patient had really received 12 hours of heparin at 10,000 units an hour, then she'd either had massive coagulopathy OR was playing with the pump & or unspiking and emptying the bag. Guess which?

    The NM wanted me to sign the write up with her comment that "situation was resolved." I refused.

    The surgeon wrote a letter absolving me to be placed in my records.
    And I tore up the write up. In my case it ended happily ever after, because I can be like a dog with a bone.......I fear many others just assume they erred and go along with the writeup.
  13. by   elthia
    1.I was written up for not hanging a second liter of IV fluids on an order that was for "one liter only then d/c". I made sure that one was torn up.

    2.I had repeatedly told this same nurse manager in person and in email for 8 weeks that I needed a day off for family court, and I provided a copy of the subpoena. So when she scheduled me to work, and I confronted her, we agreed that I would take family sick leave that day. Two weeks later I was written up for sick leave abuse. The union had that one torn up. The nurse manager didn't seem very appreciative of the fact that I had saved all those emails.

    3.Then I was written up for "unprofessional attitude" for the crime of writing an incident report about a HUC and an RN (one of the manager's favs) who both signed off on a stat EKG that was never done, I found the order 6 hours later when I came on shift. The pt ended up going to a tele unit for NSTEMI. I refused to sign that and wrote a refuttal.

    4. Lastly, one night I had two patients critical at the same time, different halls. So when one pt was being coded, the CNA came to the door and asked if I or the code team needed anything. I asked the docs and the code team twice if we needed anything. After 2 negatives, I told the CNA to check the VS on the pt who I suspected was going septic and was febrile and recieving a blood transfusion at the same time. (Mind you, I was the ONLY RN who was not in orientation assigned to that floor that shift.) I was written up for "lack of compassion, lack of prioritization, having a staff member leave a code." ( the sepsis pt later was shown to have had + blood cultures, and later developed DIC and acute renal failure.)

    Needless to say, I quit that job.
    Last edit by elthia on Dec 12, '06 : Reason: typo

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