Worked twenty years as a nurse and still at the bedside-- - page 2

We were discussing career options at work over the weekend, and one of the nurses commented that in her humble opinion, "nursing is the only career I know of that people don't "move up the ladder." ... Read More

  1. by   semstr
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Exactly Jenny.

    Even with my own career, I can take option A which is more of a "career" move, or option B, which would still be fun and challenging, but more of a role which allows me to live life. I've learned early on to make career choices to fit my life, not fit my life around my career.

    Again, that's what I love most about nursing. The ability to do that.
    ^5 to that Suzy!!
    I've been in the "nursing field" now since 1978 and I've worked all kind of different fields, from med/surg to OR to dialysis to (now) educating.
    I had to learn a lot to be able to work all these different areas, but hey, without learning you stay put where you are now.
    My next job will be different again, since I just heard about a hour ago, I GOT IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! YEAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH!
    That job will be more into the organizing of things and management of others.

    For those, who decide to stay on the ward, or bedside care, great! We need experienced nurses there, and I would never say, you didn't want a career. You made a career by staying with the patients and the very complicated, holistic care they need.
  2. by   llg
    I entered the nursing field knowing that I did not want to be a bedside staff nurse for very long. I viewed my nursing education as the first step in a long career in "health care" but not really sure of the exact job I wanted. I knew there are lots of varied opportunities, not just straight management -- and like SuzyK, it was that flexibility that attracted me to nursing in the first place.

    With a little time and experience, I found that I liked supporting nurses -- through teaching, research, and a little administration. So, that is where I have spent the vast majority of my career -- in a variety of CNS and Staff Development roles.

    llg
  3. by   ceecel.dee
    So many career oportunities....with one degree!

    We picked the RIGHT one.....run with it, jump with it, climb with it...the choices are endless!
  4. by   cindylouwho
    my goal as a bedside nurse is to NEVER move up to management or administration....I have no desire to do paperwork or the rest of what they do....my desires are to get my hands on those little babies I take care of and that is it....always...
  5. by   ceecel.dee
    Originally posted by cindylouwho
    my goal as a bedside nurse is to NEVER move up to management or administration....I have no desire to do paperwork or the rest of what they do....my desires are to get my hands on those little babies I take care of and that is it....always...
    Oh yeah...you've gotta love the babies! :kiss
  6. by   Disablednurse
    I don't think any nurse should start a sentence that "I am just a ..." A nurse should proudly say "I am a ..." JUST A is not the beginning of any nursing job.
  7. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by semstr
    My next job will be different again, since I just heard about a hour ago, I GOT IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! YEAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH!
    That job will be more into the organizing of things and management of others.
    Congrats on the new job, Renee!
  8. by   shrinkyrn
    Originally posted by Jenny P
    [



    When I first graduated from nursing school, the only stethescope on the floor was on a shelf with the fold up mercury BP machine at the end of the hall, all nurses HAD to have bandage scissors and a tri-colored ink pen, we assessed a patient's learning and home needs, never their hearts and lungs (that was the doctors' domain!); and I could go on and on.


    [/B]
    OMG!!!! I remember those B/P machines, and I also remember charting in three colors-- blue for days, green for evenings and red for nights!!!! A pt. asked me the other day if I knew how to take a B/P without the automatic(Dynamap) machine, I laughed so hard 'coz I thought about how much things have changed over the past 30 years. I told him that when I went into nursing they didn't have those machines out on the floor( I don't remember if they had them on the Critical Care areas or not , but I don't think so)

    I've done alot of different things over the past 29 years since I've graduated---- all in Psych...........Yes, there are different areas of Psych.........I've always felt that the changes kept me from burning out and getting stale, I've learned so much(and I continue to learn so much). Just made another change about a month ago. I've done the management thing! On two different occasions. I missed the patient contact. My only aspiration, of late, has been to make a difference in someones life. I realize that I can't change the lives of everyone, but I hope I can reach someone. (once in a while, I hear that from a patient)
  9. by   New CCU RN
    Charting in three colors?????????? WOW.... ya know, there is a nurse on my unit that still uses those change color pen things.. ya know, green, black, red, blue. I wonder if it dates back to that!
  10. by   RNforLongTime
    When I worked in a LTC facility back in 98, we used that three color charting. Black/blue for days, green for evenings and red for nights! Now, most of my charting is comoputerized so I don't need a pen for too many things. Love when the drug reps come around for the freebies!!!!!!
  11. by   CseMgr1
    I did bedside nursing for 30 years, before my mind and body started arguing with me...and I went into Case Management. While it isn't the job to end all jobs, it pays the bills..and still gives me the opportunity to use my experience to help others, which is what I've always wanted to do, since I was seven years old!
  12. by   cindyln
    I have been a nurse for 20 years now and I must say that in my experience bedside nursing is a step up from the other roles. I have been a nurse manager and worked in a clinic but my latest job on a mother/baby unit has been my most rewarding. I have been recruited twice in the last couple of years to go back to management but I turned it down. I love my patients and don't see me leaving this role until I retire.
  13. by   imenid37
    I don't consider being at the bedside something to be ashamed of. I've done this for 16 years and it's a necessary and vital service that I'm providing to society. What i do take issue w/ is the pay. I have lots of expertise, certifications, and experience. I am reliable and a resource to others. PAY ME FOR IT! I do this because I like it and I am good at it. I don't want administration or advanced practice right now (sometimes I dream of being a CNM), but I'd love to see a clinical ladder that paid and recognized me for the knowledge, education, experience, and dare I say, responsibility that I have. That's one thing really wrong w/ nursing we need to reward longevity at the bedside. Nurses shouldn't have to choose between better wages and leaving the bedside, since that is where they are most needed today. Just being a nurse is like just saving someone's life. No small task indeed The lack of respect that we get from some patients and physicians (esp. when we save their behinds time after time) appalls me.:angryfire
    Last edit by imenid37 on Apr 12, '03

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