woman dies in ER waiting room (article) - page 5

the first few paragraphs, click link for rest of story (too long to cut/paste) interesting. says she was in for abd pain 3x in 3 days,but never what they did for her test wise, or what they... Read More

  1. by   chuck1234
    Quote from kukukajoo
    I don't think the nurse is entirely to blame here. You have to remember she was discharged by a DOCTOR only 3 hours prior!

    Also, the police were the ones who brought her to the ER in the first place to be examined. obviously they thought her complaints were warranted at some point.

    Sad, very sad for all involved. I hope whoever inspects the place in the next 6 weeks goes over the place like a toothbrush on tile grout!
    Hi Kukukajoo!
    It is you again....
    Let's go straight to the point...
    Yes, indeed, the nurse is responsible for it, and she is entirely to blame here.
    If the doctor discharged this patients a few hours ago, and based on your assessment skills; you found out the patient was not supposed to be discharged...then the nurses had to speak up....even she might have to confront the doctors. If we the nurses do not speak up for the patients, then who else is doing it for them. I hope that nurse will lose her license for good, inasmuch as she did not care about the patient, nor do I think she has the assessment skills.
    \
  2. by   Myxel67
    Quote from bopps
    okay two posts in a row. Perhaps we as ED nurses should learn spanish. Too many of out patients do not understand english and this presents a major barrier to safe and effective care. I do not get the comments regarding the poor not receiving appropriate care either. We see more "poor" people in the ED than "rich" people on a day-to-day basis. Everyone receives unbiased treatment.


    Mrs. Rodriguez was a native Californian, according to the article. Apparently, there was no language problem. The woman had her ER discharge instructions which said for her to return if she had more pain, nausea, or vomiting. She had been to the ER 3 times in as many days. The triage nurse told her she had already been seen and there was nothing else they could do for her. Perhaps if the triage nurse had bothered to take her temp....But this is exactly what I mean about ER nurses who are so judgmental. You see a person you have dubbed a frequent flyer and your normally excellent assessment skills go out the window and are replaced by "WHAT YOU ALREADY KNOW IS WRONG" with the frequent flyer.

    Of course you don't do this, but from what I've seen in my own family member visits to ER, many nurses do exactly this.
  3. by   Little Panda RN
    What a horrible, horrible story. Each and every person deserves quality care regardless of thier ability to pay.

    My husband and I have had something like this happen to us when we had no insurance. To make a long story short, I had my husband in the ER 3 times in a week for abdominal pain and sent home each time with no work -up. Just told to come back if the pain gets worse. Well it did and if it was not for a friend of mine who is a RN my husband would be dead right now from a ruptured appendix. It had been ruptured for 48 hours before anyone would listen to us. I chalk that up to having no insurance.

    I hope this family takes action against those who just stood by and did nothing.

    Just my 2 cents.
  4. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    LEOs are not doctors.

    They frequently see citizens who are agitated & histrionic.

    The police normally wouldn't remove an apparently distressed patient from the ER unless someone on the staff indicated she was ok to go & they weren't going to treat her.
    Ok, you are probably correct. I'm just temporarily biased against cops.
  5. by   GingerSue
    [quote] the nurse is responsible for it, and she is entirely to blame here.
    If the doctor discharged this patients a few hours ago, and based on your assessment skills; you found out the patient was not supposed to be discharged...then the nurses had to speak up....even she might have to confront the doctors. If we the nurses do not speak up for the patients, then who else is doing it for them. I hope that nurse will lose her license for good, inasmuch as she did not care about the patient, nor do I think she has the assessment skills.[quote]

    - did the nurse have adequate assessment skills?
    - or poor judgment?
    - the well-being of this patient is not a choice - she died unnecessarily - this is serious!

    - and what about the doctor's skills?

    The woman who died was not adequately assessed by the health care professionals.
    The health care professionals are responsible for this happening.
    They failed to meet this woman's needs.
  6. by   bopps
    Quote from Myxel67
    Mrs. Rodriguez was a native Californian, according to the article. Apparently, there was no language problem. The woman had her ER discharge instructions which said for her to return if she had more pain, nausea, or vomiting. She had been to the ER 3 times in as many days. The triage nurse told her she had already been seen and there was nothing else they could do for her. Perhaps if the triage nurse had bothered to take her temp....But this is exactly what I mean about ER nurses who are so judgmental. You see a person you have dubbed a frequent flyer and your normally excellent assessment skills go out the window and are replaced by "WHAT YOU ALREADY KNOW IS WRONG" with the frequent flyer.

    Of course you don't do this, but from what I've seen in my own family member visits to ER, many nurses do exactly this.
    Not. We have a incredably frequent flyer . She came in one day with an MI. Due to use NOT throwing away our assessment skills and not judging her even though she sometimes comes in 2x a wk and in lower income etc.-We listened to her AND SAVED HER LIVE. And yes she still visits us frequently for minor cc especially on holidays. This is not an isolated incident. Thats what makes ED nursing such an art form YOU CANT EVER KNOW WHAT IS WRONG. Because the minute you do that something will bit you in the rear badly and people will sufer. Sorry, i work in a busy ED. Im in the enviroment. I am sorry for the aparently horrible experiences you have suffered during your ED visits.Whatever you have experienced, please note it is unfair to judge us all. Thats called generalizing and I was taught NEVER to do that in nursing school.
  7. by   bopps
    Sorry for the spelling errors in the above post. I really do know how to spell.
  8. by   chuck1234
    Quote from bopps
    Not. We have a incredably frequent flyer . She came in one day with an MI. Due to use NOT throwing away our assessment skills and not judging her even though she sometimes comes in 2x a wk and in lower income etc.-We listened to her AND SAVED HER LIVE. And yes she still visits us frequently for minor cc especially on holidays. This is not an isolated incident. Thats what makes ED nursing such an art form YOU CANT EVER KNOW WHAT IS WRONG. Because the minute you do that something will bit you in the rear badly and people will sufer. Sorry, i work in a busy ED. Im in the enviroment. I am sorry for the aparently horrible experiences you have suffered during your ED visits.Whatever you have experienced, please note it is unfair to judge us all. Thats called generalizing and I was taught NEVER to do that in nursing school.
    "Generalizing....I was taught NEVER to do that in nursing school."
    Didn't Ms. Edith Rodriquez died from it...
    Last edit by chuck1234 on May 21, '07
  9. by   GLORIAmunchkin72
    "While Ms. Rodriquez was dying like a "dog," none of the nurses in that ER came out and spoke for her. What a shame!!!!"

    What about the janitor who mopped around her? It looks like the indifference was catching.
  10. by   bopps
    wait i have a feeling im going to get flamed so i guess ill go down in flames! I want you all to realize I am in no way condoning what happened to that poor pt. Its horrible, pathetic, and just plain sad. However I don't think we know the real story. Lets face it can anyone know what really happened unless they were really there? The media always(and yes i am generalizing) blows things way out of proportion. So what do we know? What really did happen that horrid night? There are always 2 sides to every story and unfortunately we will never hear the patients side. I think her death speaks louder than words. All im asking is for the pointing fingers to stop. All of you who can't stand us sorry ED nurses may some day find yourself looking up into our eyes. I pray to God it is a good experience for you. I would be proud to help you.
  11. by   TazziRN
    Bopps, I agree with you that the finger-pointing toward ER nurses in general needs to stop, however, King Drew has a bad rep for mistreating/misdiagnosing pts. It would not surprised me in the least to find out that what was reported is exactly---or close to---what happened.
  12. by   chuck1234
    Quote from GLORIAmunchkin72
    "While Ms. Rodriquez was dying like a "dog," none of the nurses in that ER came out and spoke for her. What a shame!!!!"

    What about the janitor who mopped around her? It looks like the indifference was catching.
    Janitor is not trained to do that, therefore, he/she is not responsible for it.
  13. by   TazziRN
    Janitor may not be trained to do that, but every housekeeper in every other place I've worked at will stop and ask a pt on the floor if he/she needs help.

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