Witnessed unsterile procedure and feeling terrible about it - page 5

by cblake4293

14,086 Views | 106 Comments

I am a new grad and have been working as an RN for 5 months. Everyone I work with is very experienced and I am definitely the newbie. Yesterday I witnessed an LPN with 30 yrs experience straight cath a male without using... Read More


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    I think the first thing I would do is read the policies to make sure that my own personal practice was in line with the policies. And then I think I would speak to your manager or educator about doing some follow up education. All you need to say is something like: "I have been observing and working on my skills with several people, and I have seen many things done different ways. Would it be possible for us to get a refresher on this? Just to make sure we're putting our patients' safety first?" The other thing is, if this is a patient that usually self caths, and they prefer not to break out the betadine and all, I would document their refusal of you providing nursing care at the "standard" per policy. They have the right to refuse care (they may need more patient education and coaching, but that's not the immediate matter of concern).

    Ultimately, if you are ever called into court, they will examine state law and facility policy. Remember that. Make your practice fall in line with your policies, and you won't have a problem with that respect. Also to think about, when a lawsuit is brought, the legal team representing your facility will sit down with the involved staff and determine if you followed policies/procedures. Just a handy dandy FYI for future reference for you. The other thing to consider is what are your responsibilities regarding delegation. You are an RN, in LTC/SNF - how many LPNs are you working with? Yeah, they have to practice to their scope, but if you are delegating, you are responsible for supervising and/or "following up" on what you've delegated... Just some food for thought.

    And the last comment the original poster wrote, your conscience will never fail you. If you have a gut feeling something isn't right, it probably isn't. It will get better. Really it does
    cindjo717 and leslie :-D like this.
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    Leslie said it well. I can stop cringing now.....
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    I also work LTC and we follow the P and P which is the same as a hospital. Yes, it is their home but as nurses we are held to the same standard of care that the hospital is. When in doubt, check your policies and/or speak with the NM. An inservice sounds like a great idea, without actually calling anyone out.
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    just maybe, the OP could discretly discuss it with the LPN before stabbing her in the back? Just a thought.....
    for the life of me i will never understand nurses loyalty to ea other, more so than their loyalty to the pt.
    it's just not right.

    no one wants to get anyone in trouble.
    but when your concerns (re standards of care) are valid and reasonable, remaining silent will not help the situation or the pt.
    this sister/brotherhood force is for the birds...when it interferes with quality care.

    leslie
    Race Mom, anotherone, elprup, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from leslie :-D

    for the life of me i will never understand nurses loyalty to ea other, more so than their loyalty to the pt.
    it's just not right.

    no one wants to get anyone in trouble.
    but when your concerns (re standards of care) are valid and reasonable, remaining silent will not help the situation or the pt.
    this sister/brotherhood force is for the birds...when it interferes with quality care.

    leslie
    This is what makes nursing such a miserable job sometimes. Nurses that wont stick together. Why can't we work together to optimize pt care without stabbing each other in the back? Discuss things as a team and work it out. The holier than thou attitude that I see a lot in nursing gets old.

    Don't get me wrong either, I'm all for providing the best possible pt care. I just don't see why that can't be done while maintaining loyalty and camaraderie with our co-workers. Sick of the whole kindergartenesque tattle tailing system
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    Quote from lilaclover6984
    I just don't see why that can't be done while maintaining loyalty and camaraderie with our co-workers. Sick of the whole kindergartenesque tattle tailing system
    Totally agree. I don't understand why people so often suggest talking to a superior before simply approaching the person involved. I'm guessing it stems from a fear of confrontation that so many women seem to have.
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    of course you should speak to the person first.
    and if that works out, end of issue.
    but if it doesn't, then it needs to go up the chain.

    leslie
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    Quote from lilaclover6984
    This is what makes nursing such a miserable job sometimes. Nurses that wont stick together. Why can't we work together to optimize pt care without stabbing each other in the back? Discuss things as a team and work it out. The holier than thou attitude that I see a lot in nursing gets old.

    Don't get me wrong either, I'm all for providing the best possible pt care. I just don't see why that can't be done while maintaining loyalty and camaraderie with our co-workers. Sick of the whole kindergartenesque tattle tailing system
    i haven't peeked at your profile lila...are you a new nurse?
    while i do share your ideals of camaraderie, nsg is more often than not, a very back-biting business.
    and it is the nurses who truly want to work as a team, are the ones who are also most often targets of other nurses' contempt.
    i for one, do believe that it is r/t working with mostly women.
    others do not share my beliefs - but to me, it is a highly back-stabbing business...
    and it is the ones who want to do right by the patient, are the ones who are often bullied/harrassed by those who have more or less become burnt out, aeb shabby habits and standards.
    not all, but many.

    i would love to work in a utopic nsg workplace, where we all hold hands and gaze at rainbows.
    but for the most part, we have a looooong way to go before even something remotely similar occurs.

    leslie
    Race Mom and elprup like this.
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    Quote from leslie :-D

    i haven't peeked at your profile lila...are you a new nurse?
    while i do share your ideals of camaraderie, nsg is more often than not, a very back-biting business.
    and it is the nurses who truly want to work as a team, are the ones who are also most often targets of other nurses' contempt.
    i for one, do believe that it is r/t working with mostly women.
    others do not share my beliefs - but to me, it is a highly back-stabbing business...
    and it is the ones who want to do right by the patient, are the ones who are often bullied/harrassed by those who have more or less become burnt out, aeb shabby habits and standards.
    not all, but many.

    i would love to work in a utopic nsg workplace, where we all hold hands and gaze at rainbows.
    but for the most part, we have a looooong way to go before even something remotely similar occurs.

    leslie
    No, I'm not a brand new nurse. I've been working as a nurse a little over 4 years now in a few different areas. Long enough to have seen the realities. Prior to being a nurse I worked in several different fields and have never seen the backstabbing that I do in nursing.

    I just can't stand the whole tattle tale mentality. What are we all 6? I have provided the best pt care I can to my Pts in my 4 years as nurse and not once have I felt the need to go running to management.
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    Follow your chain of command. I do believe it is recommended that you speak to the nurse first. You can do this casually, as in discussing the proper technique because you want to learn the best way (Ex: "I have seen so many different ways it is performed, show me how you do it"...then question if it is supposed to be sterile) I know this sounds as if you are acting "dumb", and essentially, you are. That way it will open up a discussion on the best way to do the procedure. I would avoid going directly to mgmt, and perhaps discussing it with her first. As hard as it may be, that LPN will respect you a TON more for bringing her error to her attention before she hears it from her boss...good luck
    joanna73 and BrandonLPN like this.


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