Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 3

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   ANnot4me
    I spent alot of time and money getting a college degree. I get so offended when people ask me about "nursing school." It's demeaning. I politely inform them that I didn't go to 'nursing school', I went to college." It makes me sick when I think about the fact that alot of people don't even realize that colleges offer degrees in nursing.

    I'm not a snob, I have a college education -- I didn't go to nursing school and I'm tired of being demeaned by other nurses because I chose to enter nursing through a university. If nothing more, nurses who wear "BSN" on their name tags are educating the public.
  2. by   NicuGal
    Sounds like you have a problem with "nursing school".....hate to break it to you, but we all went to college, but to the general public, if you are a nurse, you went to nursing school. I would have to tell you to get over that little problem....I'm sure you get a lot of eye rolls at your response and I'm really sure your patients don't care.
  3. by   nurs4kids
    Lol, chicgap..perhaps attitudes like yours is where this whole issue stems. Last time I checked, all nurses are required to attend college. Doctors are asked where they attended medical school. Do you think this offends them? I believe in order to sit for the nclex, one must have satisfied required curriculum from an accredited COLLEGE. I agree with nicugal that you probably get a lot of eye rolls and laughs. Then you leave the questioner thinking you have some feelings of inadequacy. A much more appropriate response would be, "I attended ___ University". This would provide the info requested AND let them know you went to COLLEGE. We're a little backward down south, but all of our colleges and university have subdepartments that ARE called "The School of Nursing", so in essence we DO go to nursing school@___ University.
  4. by   prmenrs
    Well, actually, there are a few of us dinosaurs left out here who did NOT go to college! Like me, who went to a diploma School of Nursing. I don't seem to remember a problem getting into the room to take my "Boards" (2 full days of testing!). And I waited about 7 weeks for the results!

    I think you should be able to have any and all initials you want, and have earned, placed on your name badge.
  5. by   Nursz-R-Awsm
    There are so many good responses on this one. I am not allowed to have my BSN included on my badge where I work. I was disappointed because I worked hard for it and was proud of my accomplishment.

    Personally, I think everyone should be allowed...for many of the same reasons that have been mentioned, like educating the public. I also think that no matter what degree (or diploma) we earn to become a nurse, we should be allowed to wear it because it represents the hard work, long nights of studying, sacrificed family time and social life which brought us to that point of improving our education.
    Just my opinion!
  6. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by kellyray
    [B]I think that Fiestynurse hinted at a very important reason to wear your credentials on your nametag:

    "Patients have a right to know who is taking care of them and what credentials this caregiver has. Since nurses don't have offices where their diplomas, degrees, or certifications can be displayed for patients to see (such as doctors who have their walls covered with this stuff) being able to display this on our name badges is important. "

    The job descriptions and responsibilities between a staff RN who has received their education through a two, three or four year nursing program are the same. In the twenty years as an LPN, I've yet to be able to see the difference in nursing care based on education. I see no reason why a nurse would require more the RN on their name badge.

    Last night, we sat at work looking at our state board of nursing news letter which containted recent board results from our state. The results showed the associate nurses programs had a higher percentage of students passing their state boards upon graduation then the nurses who had received a BSN. We currently have many new graduate nurses on the floor I work on and so far the only person that unfortunately did not pass her state boards was a nurse who received her BSN. I question what type of nursing program these private and state colleges have here since students pass the state boards in the eighty percent range while the community colleges are in the high ninties. I wonder what is lacking in their program that is reflecting in the board results.
  7. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by NicuGal
    Sounds like you have a problem with "nursing school".....hate to break it to you, but we all went to college, but to the general public, if you are a nurse, you went to nursing school. I would have to tell you to get over that little problem....I'm sure you get a lot of eye rolls at your response and I'm really sure your patients don't care.

    I totally agree with your message. Patients want a nurse who is able to give safe care and a college education is not a sure thing this will happen.
  8. by   Q.
    And I guess my next question would be...

    Why shouldn't nurses wear their credentials on their badges?


    I've had patients who were shocked that ALL nurses didn't have a 4 year degree.
  9. by   NICU_Nurse
    Just a short comment here... 'nursing school'? I have never heard a doctor, when asked about his education, choose to say 'So-and-so University' rather than point out with pride that they went to 'MED SCHOOL'. If anything, those two phrases are in the SAME SENTENCE! (I.e., 'I attended Med School at Blabbityblah University...'). In fact, other professions use the same verbal shorthand; what about LAW school? I am very proud to be an almost graduate of NURSING; I would hope that my fellow almost-graduates feel the same way. I don't find that demeaning at all; in fact, I believe it would more likely be the person SPEAKING the words rather than the words themselves that would possibly bother me. In the end, it is the fact that we are ultimately nurses that should make us proud of ourselve and each other; how we got here makes little difference in the long run.
    Last edit by NICU_Nurse on Aug 28, '03
  10. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K
    And I guess my next question would be...

    Why shouldn't nurses wear their credentials on their badges?

    It surprise that this is an issue with some nurses. I don't see the necessity of wearing your education on a name badge. Identifying the type of licensed nurse you are, or if you are a supervisor, should be sufficient. To me, all I've seen in messages here with the nurses who feel they should have BSN on their name badge, have a need to show how they've sacrafice to receive their degree. Is that really necessary and again the patient's priority is safe care which is achieved more through years of experience in nursing and not the number of years in the classroom.


    I've had patients who were shocked that ALL nurses didn't have a 4 year degree.
    What is your point? Did this patient feel that if a nurse did not have a four year degree, she was inadequate? I've worked in hospitals and a nursing home and I've seen many associate and diploma nurses who I would choose as a supervisor/team leader over a nurse who had a degree in nursing. Organizational skills are more important today in nursing and this is where I see a nurse suceed or fail in handling a patient assignment and supervising others.
  11. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by chigap
    I spent alot of time and money getting a college degree. I get so offended when people ask me about "nursing school." It's demeaning. I politely inform them that I didn't go to 'nursing school', I went to college." It makes me sick when I think about the fact that alot of people don't even realize that colleges offer degrees in nursing.

    Diploma nursing programs are less seen today so nurses are generally educated through a community, state, or private college. I really question if the general public doesn't realize that nursing programs are in colleges today. I think most people understand that a college or an univeristy setting is where nurses receive their education.

    I'm not a snob, I have a college education -- I didn't go to nursing school and I'm tired of being demeaned by other nurses because I chose to enter nursing through a university. If nothing more, nurses who wear "BSN" on their name tags are educating the public.
    The public or patients want nurses who are able to educate them about their disease or illness, a procedure and many other areas when they are under our care. I doubt many patients would ask you to tell them about your eduational history, but rather have you tell them about what to expect during a procedure, what they need to know when they go home, or giving them information about a new medication to name just a few examples.
  12. by   mcl4
    as an evolving profession vs. a stagnant "vocation".

    In regard to the statement, "Personally myself being a military man I find the position you hold carries more clout than your degree" I believe that a prerequisite of a commissioned officer in the Navy Nurse Corps (as well as the Air Force and Army), is a bachelor's degree in nursing. Clearly, the U.S. military recognizes the importance of education and rewards its soldiers with "higher positions" accordingly. Additionally, if commissioned officers are recognized with salutes from the enlisted soldiers (regardless of the enlisted position) and are addressed as "Sir" or "Mam", (as well as the ensigns on their uniform), then a nurse wearing BSN, or MNSc on his/her badge would seem very appropriate to say the least.


    This is comparing apples to oranges by showing how the military recognizes education. A RN who graduates from any type of nursing program, takes the same boards and many times has the same job description regardless with the fact that they received an ADN, diploma or BSN. Job responsiblities should and does distinguish a nurse. One way this is done is by listing on a name badge whether you are a staff RN, a supervisor, nurse manager or DON. What differentiates a RN is their position and increase job responsiblities. Many supervisors do have their bachelor or master degree in nursing, but several don't in the hospitals and nursing home I've work or have worked at. I hope we don't come to adopting the military's way of showing their educational achievements by having others salute and call them sir or mam.
  13. by   nurs4kids
    prmenrs.. I apologize. I DID overlook the diploma programs. It's ashamed those programs are not as prominent as they used to be. I have never worked with a diploma nurse that did not have the best knowledge base on the unit. You guys are the backbone of nursing as we know it today.

    I have to agree with susy k's comment...WHY SHOULD NURSES NOT WEAR THEIR CREDENTIALS ON THEIR BADGES??

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?