Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 16

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   caroladybelle
    As a travelor, My OCN status indicates that I have passed a test demonstrating a standard of knowledge regarding Oncology Nursing - it designates in depth interest, also.
  2. by   jlc
    I spent 5 hard years earning my BSN. Wrote more papers then I care to remember and took more tests then I care to remember. So I wear the credentials BSN on my ID badge with great pride and a better understanding of my patients and their care. It amazes me that anyone would question my right to acknowledge my achievment, maybe they are just a little intimadated. jj
  3. by   renerian
    For me it is because of the adversity I dealt with getting all three of my degrees. Has nothing to do with ego has to do with the fact I am so proud I could actually do it.

    renerian
  4. by   eagleriver
    It's wonderful to be proud of our accomplishments. We can do that even if we aren't wearing anything.

    How do we separate pride from ego?
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by eagleriver
    It's wonderful to be proud of our accomplishments. We can do that even if we aren't wearing anything.

    How do we separate pride from ego?
    I like the way you think, Eagleriver.

    Being being proud of one's accomplishments is seperate from one's competence as a nurse. RN is good enough to convey that, in my book.

    The CCRN is mine...I did that...I'm proud of it, yes, BUT I don't need to display it. I demonstrate it.

    But that's just me. Competent is as competent does.

    Gotta say this...when I see a nurse who needs to post a gazillion intials on the nametag? I think ego vs pride. I also suspect LSE and am often proven right.

    Those who hope more respect comes from more intitials often are disappointed if the self worth isn't there already.
  6. by   RN2B2005
    I think we're all missing the point of the original poster's question.

    My impression is that he's looking for validation--for someone to say, "Those (BSN, MSN, etc.) nurses are (stuck-up, incompetent, etc.) and you don't need (a 4-year degree, special certification, etc.) to be a good nurse." Perhaps he has the nagging feeling that his "military experience" is not an adequate substitute for classroom education; perhaps he just resents individuals who have worked hard to attain a higher station in life than the one he currently holds. He might find that validation here, but I hope not.

    Medic_Kev, the reason nurses (not "nurse's") wear their (not "there") degrees and credentials on their (not "there") badges is to demonstrate to patients and colleagues their (once again, not "there") professional standing.

    That, or they're (not "there" OR "their") doing it to demonstrate that they've had the education required to recognise the difference between the possessive and plural forms of a noun, and the ability to differentiate between homonyms.

    Oh, and I'm an ADN student, before anyone slams me for being biased.:roll
  7. by   frannybee
    Uniforms over here tend to tell more of a story than the name badges pinned to them - in my hospital, if you wear sky blue, you're a Staff Nurse (RN), navy blue = Sister, white with yellow epaulettes = student nurse, dark green = auxilliary nurse, grey and white stripe = specialist nurse etc. I have my first and last names on my badge due to hospital policy, with RN on the end. I would have had my letters added except they were earned in Australia and are not the same as the UK qualifications. I have a BN and WH&SO Level II and am proud of them, but since our patients know that my uniform and the letters 'RN' after my name mean I am qualified to care for them, I'll leave it at that.
  8. by   GoodEnuf
    "I would really like to see more emphasis on the need to educate the public about what NURSES DO, and less about the 'need' to educate them about the differing CREDENTIALS."
    Yes, I agree with you, mattsmom81. But I believe wearing your credentials allows pt's (or others) to question us about their meaning. That's when we have the opportunity to educate them about the hard training, education, licensing, etc. we all go thru to become nurses as opposed to some fictitious 2 week program with OJT. It not only helps remove stereotypes, but also brings a respect to the profession of nursing.
    Another point, why is it we expect and look for credentials from a doctor, but then to some it becomes offensive to see credentials from a nurse?
  9. by   eagleriver
    Thanks for your endorsement. It took me a minute to figure out what "LSE" meant.
  10. by   RED_ALERT37
    Well I think if anything it will help the patients learn their ABCs... I think its great to be able to acknowledge your accomplishments, but how many patients know what a BSN, MSN, CEN, CCRN, MICN, etc etc etc all mean ???? I think if you are providing excellent care, regardless of the degree is way more important
  11. by   eagleriver
    "Medic_Kev, the reason nurses (not "nurse's") wear their (not "there") degrees and credentials on their (not "there") badges is to demonstrate to patients and colleagues their (once again, not "there") professional standing.

    That, or they're (not "there" OR "their") doing it to demonstrate that they've had the education required to recognise the difference between the possessive and plural forms of a noun, and the ability to differentiate between homonyms."

    Rather than focus on how to make someone feel bad, why not stick to the issue.

    As with any worthwhile discussion, this one has evolved. Lets focus on insight and growth, not language or writing skills.
  12. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by GoodEnuf
    W have the opportunity to educate them about the hard training, education, licensing, etc. we all go thru to become nurses as opposed to some fictitious 2 week program with OJT. It not only helps remove stereotypes, but also brings a respect to the profession of nursing.
    Another point, why is it we expect and look for credentials from a doctor, but then to some it becomes offensive to see credentials from a nurse?
    We can educate the public about what nurses do without going into the differing credentials. I still suspect much of this credential-wearing in nurses is for ego reasons, and I've just never subscribed to that kind of thinking.

    I don't see doctors with anything but MD or DO on their coats.
    How about we do what they do...their JOB... and stop trying to brag that "I've got a piece of paper that says I know more than that nurse." (to quote another poster here)

    I just do NOT see that attitude as helpful to our profession. Those who feel higher education is the end all DO, I'm sure.
  13. by   GoodEnuf
    We can educate the public about what nurses do without going into the differing credentials. I still suspect much of this credential-wearing in nurses is for ego reasons, and I've just never subscribed to that kind of thinking.
    For whatever reason each person wears them is a mute point, I think. It only helps the profession's image

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?