Why are Newbies Such Whiners? - page 4

catchy title, eh? right up there with "why are nurses such backstabbers" (assuming that all nurses are backstabbers) and "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses so mean?" i don't know about... Read More

  1. by   blueberrybon
    Quote from adrienurse
    if i had the time and energy to teach 1:1 it wouldn't be a problem, but i can see how my stress can be interpreted as hostililty.
    first of all, i think this statement hits the nail on the head. the stress of being a newbie or even a student, combined with the over-taxed nurse having to successfully deal with job and teaching at the same time, is an equation who's answer is probably almost always in the negative column.

    then, of course, this site is a good venting venue. being able to voice frustration with problems, dislikes, etc. helps the ventor get through the difficult situation. not unlike the start of this thread actually.

    therefore, there are probably way more thankful newbies out there than whiners, but they just don't post as often. shame though, isn't it?

    so to all of you nurses who have to deal with this... i just have one thing to say: thank you so much!

    blue (newbie)
  2. by   RNHawaii34
    pls. remember not all " newbies" are whiners. what i don't like as a newbie is hearing the 'oldtimers' backstab other nurses....not a good example. tsk, tsk, tsk..
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from rnhawaii34
    pls. remember not all " newbies" are whiners. what i don't like as a newbie is hearing the 'oldtimers' backstab other nurses....not a good example. tsk, tsk, tsk..
    that is exactly the point of this thread - not to make generalized stereotypical statements.

    steph
  4. by   Medic_Nurse
    Hi all,

    I'm a newbie to Nursing, but I'm certainly not a newbie to healthcare (paramedic for 11 years), and I am afraid I kind of have to agree with the "whiners" comment.
    I absolutely hate the majority of my classmates--and we're only in second year!! They whine, *****, moan and complain about every single thing that is said, done, or expected of them, and they totally give the Nursing proffesion a bad name. (there's 22 in my class)The only common denominator these girls have is a number of first year instructors that literally "held their hand" thru every procedure. (I transfered in)They have no self confidence or self motivation. My paramedic instructor was like a drill sergent (God Bless you Marley!! ) and she really made us aware of our capabilities. I can not imagine going through this program without that kind of background. I wish we had more instructors who were firm and kind. People need to believe in themselves, and they need to realize that the real world is a helluva lot tougher than the classroom.
    Allright--thanx for the rant.
  5. by   burnay76
    I think the story here is the exception, not the rule. Most new nurses come equipped with the ability to be professional and the sense not to break down in front of a patient and divulge all your problems. The fact still stands that the 1st year turnover of nurses leaving the profession is ridiculously high. Something is wrong. I think the average nurse is a great patient educator, but it is an entirely different skill set to teach peers (I say this as a past professional educator myself, with some knowledge of education techniques). I am not certain many nurses possess the ability to effectively teach peers. I am relatively new and know that my preceptors have all been excellent nurses - but could learn a lot about peer instruction. This will result in hard feelings and disenfranchisement with the profession (believe me, I battle with these feelings myself). Think back to all the teachers you have ever had. Some of them were aweful, right? Chances are they were very knowledgable, just poor educators. You probably felt very poorly of them and frequently felt you were treatred unfairly or they "had it out for you". Nursing instruction is very specialized, with very little general education or instructional training (unless you happen to be a BSN, which I am not by the way - but have BA in other field) - there's just no time in the curriculum to prepare nurses to be adepts at peer education. Thus, when a nurse takes on this role they are really woefully unprepared, and relations suffer.

    If these forums can act as an outlet for that frustration , then so be it. Better here than in front of a patient. "Why are newbies such whiners" is an inflammatory as "Why are preceptors mean, and eat their young" and will only serve to solidify some peoples image of experienced nurses as being disconnected from and uncaring regarding the incoming generation.

    To really do something about it I think we should all commit to finding a way to become as skilled at peer education as possible. Then we can truly be part of the solution.
  6. by   GrnHonu99
    I'm a newbie. I've never been eaten. All the seasoned nurses around me are wonderful. They mentor me and I am open to constructive criticism. I'm new there isn't anything I can do about that but just keep on truckin through. Wisdom comes with experience and for that, I respect the seasoned nurses on my floor. Of course they know more than me, theyve been doing it a lot longer. I'm not defensive, if they tell me something, i'm incredibly greatful for their help. I'll take a word of wisdom from anyone who is willing to give it...RN, Pct/HUC..etc.

    Preceptee/Preceptor is a working relationship. Each person has to be receptive and do their part. I can't stand whining or excuse making. If I did something wrong it certainly wasn't on purpose so why should I get defensive? if my preceptor corrects me, that is why she is there, to mentor me! I just lack experience and if someone corrects me, thank goodness!

    I had the greatest preceptor ever! She was patient, smart and a great mentor. On the other hand I was open to criticism, never talked in front of a patient and worked with her to make the most out of the experience. It was such a positive experience.

    However, wanting to give an antihypertensive to a pt. with a sysbp less than 80? well that kind of seems like a lack of critical thinking rather than experience...I mean come on......
  7. by   PANurseRN1
    It may be inflammatory, but I think one of the reasons the OP posted it was out of sheer frustration for the pounding experienced nurses take here from new nurses. On amost a daily basis a new nurse starts a thread or posts about "eating our young." For the most part, however, experienced nurses here remain silent on the very real frustrations they often have with new nurses.

    The thread brings up some very good points: new nurses are not all angels, older nurses are not all "young eaters," and new nurses do need to take some responsibility for their learning, as well as learn how to accept criticism.
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from batman24
    i didn't mean to offend the op or the other poster cited in their opening paragraph. i apologize if it came across that way.
    [font="comic sans ms"]i did mean the title to be a little tongue in cheek -- and to point out the silliness of assuming that all nurses are mean, backstabbing evildoers who eat their young. and i wasn't offended. although i do get really tired of reading thread after thread entitled "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses such backstabbers," etc. i get really tired of people who blame all of their negative interactions on the other person!
  9. by   TrickieTam
    I'm a newbie also and one thing I learned while in school was "listen to your patient". If your patient refuses a medication its usually a good and lifesaving reason. Thing is, new nurses are told throughout their entire time in school that they are supervisors, so when someone tells them what to do they think someone is trying to boss them around. I work with nurses who have been in the field nearly their entire life and I take note to everything they do. You learn best just by listening.
  10. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]i did mean the title to be a little tongue in cheek -- and to point out the silliness of assuming that all nurses are mean, backstabbing evildoers who eat their young. and i wasn't offended. although i do get really tired of reading thread after thread entitled "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses such backstabbers," etc. i get really tired of people who blame all of their negative interactions on the other person!
    there are two sides to every story. sometimes, one side is just that the person is a bitter, difficult person. but not every time and that goes both ways.

    i like the phrase, 'in the trenches' to describe nursing. the war analogy is apt. just like war, the 'newbies' are sometime treated with some level of cynicism, a need to 'prove themselves'. when lives are at stake, the consequences are large and so is the need to get on your feet. the interactions in the trenches are just as high as the stakes involved.

    perspective is everthing. chalk it up to being 'eaten', or chalk it up to the occupational hazard of the job you chose.

    in any case, you can never affect the actions of others more than you can affect your own actions. the key action you can influence in any interpersonal exchange is your own.

    ~faith,
    timothy.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Although I do get really tired of reading thread after thread entitled "Nurses Eat Their Young" and "Why Are Nurses Such BackStabbers," etc. I get really tired of people who blame all of their negative interactions on the other person!
    It's easier to blame the other person for some, since the other person isn't here to tell their side of the story.
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    It's easier to blame the other person for some, since the other person isn't here to tell their side of the story.
    Very true . . . . .

    Attitude is a choice . . .

    No one can take advantage of you without your permission. At least after the first time . . . sometimes we are a bit naive.

    steph
  13. by   anne74
    I was eaten alive by some really poor preceptors - and I've always been nothing but thankful and respectful them. I admire every nurse who has more experience than me, and I seek and appreciate chances to learn from them. I totally agree with the other poster who stated that there are many wonderfully experienced nurses who are poor educators.

    I also think part of the problem is that nursing schools are terrible at preparing new grads these days. Most older nurses got much more clinical time in school, so when they graduated, they could hit the ground running (especially those diploma nurses!) So older nurses are comparing their experience as a new grad to the new grads of today.

    Now we get hardly any clinical time, then are thrown into highly technical situations with very ill patients. Honestly, I feel like new grads of today get the vast majority of their nursing skills during their first year of nursing. So consider us learning from scratch and have some patience! (My mother is a diploma nurse, and she was flabbergasted with the pathetic amount of clinical time I got in my BSN program - even worse, she was shocked with the amount of technology and body of knowledge I was expected to handle, with such little training.)

    The new grad examples the OP mentioned are unfortunate, but seem to be in the minority - at least from my experiences. There are always some bad apples who come out of nursing school with poor attitudes. But I think it's much more prevelant to see an eager new nurse being shredded by an experienced, yet jaded, impatient nurse.

    Many times if you see a new nurse being defensive, it's because they've experinced a long history of being beat up, ridiculed and belittled. In fact, I had so much anxiety from poor preceptors, I started making stupid mistakes and became even worse! Most new grads try very hard and want to be good nurses, but when our confidence gets shot down, it's very hard to crawl out of that hole and improve.

    By the way - I transferred to a new unit, had wonderful preceptors, and now I'm actually becoming a decent nurse! So that's my validation that good preceptors can make - or break - our new generations of nurses.
    Last edit by anne74 on Jan 8, '07

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