Why are Newbies Such Whiners? - page 3

catchy title, eh? right up there with "why are nurses such backstabbers" (assuming that all nurses are backstabbers) and "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses so mean?" i don't know about... Read More

  1. by   AuntieRN
    I am a newbie and I not only had the most awesome preceptor both during school and now on my job...but I have the most awesome coworkers. I can ask anyone anything no matter how dumb and they answer me without sarcasm or treating me like I am stupid. I also know that when I feel like I am over my head any one of them will help me out. Even when it is something I probably should know or be able to handle. I just finished my second week off orientation...and I just want to say...Thank you to all the wonderful preceptors out there..
  2. by   kishah
    whatz
  3. by   Julie_Bean
    Quote from maryloufu
    Ummm... newbie- or semi-newbie here. From my view- those nurses who supposedly eat the young also eat their peers. Some people just suck and there is no getting around that.
    I think this is the case.
    I just graduated in december though and was lucky enough to have made it through all of nursing school with out interacting with this type of 'eat the young' nurse. I have unfortunately heard the expression around though.
  4. by   Batman24
    Quote from critterlover
    i think ruby meant for the title of this thread to be a little tongue-in-cheek

    at least, that is the way i took it.
    i didn't mean to offend the op or the other poster cited in their opening paragraph. i apologize if it came across that way.
  5. by   Roy Fokker
    I am a newbie and I not only had the most awesome preceptor both during school and now on my job...but I have the most awesome coworkers. I can ask anyone anything no matter how dumb and they answer me without sarcasm or treating me like I am stupid. I also know that when I feel like I am over my head any one of them will help me out. Even when it is something I probably should know or be able to handle.
    :yeahthat:

    From my view- those nurses who supposedly eat the young also eat their peers. Some people just suck and there is no getting around that.
    :yeahthat:

    Quote from traumaRUs
    no one expects the novice to have the knowledge level of the experienced preceptor.
    Something that my wonderful, supportive co-workers are quick to point out and remind me.

    Constantly giving me reassurance when I don't tape report or finish charting because of a crazy night that: "it's ok. You'll get the hang of it soon!"

    Makes me feel less of a 'slacker' :spin:
    Last edit by Roy Fokker on Jan 8, '07
  6. by   UM Review RN
    I don't get many real whiners. Most are just plain overwhelmed and plenty scared.

    I try very hard to teach them the basics and at least once a shift, if we get a calm, "teachable" moment, I'll try to focus in on an area where they might be a little weak or just need to enhance a skill.

    I enjoy teaching the obvious things that students and new grads need to learn, but the more subtle elements of professionalism and respect toward all coworkers (and I mean from the housekeepers on) is also conveyed by my comments and my actions.

    Some grads will roll their eyes at the assignment or what another nurse did, and I feel it's my job to teach them that yes, this is the usual assignment, and yes, we finish what gets started on the other shifts without complaining because it'll happen to us too, so best accept those facts gracefully.
  7. by   lauralassie
    i agree i get sick of it too. but then, i really think new nurses are more stressed than we were (i too have been a nurse that long). the reason being, i think most nursing schools don't train a nurse for what their work will be. there is too much focus on book work and theory rather than application of theory ,ie...working!. (young nurses don't get me wrong, we got the same background on theory you did , it's just that we worked under the watchful eye of a nursing instructor much more time than most schools seem to now days. ) i work icu, er. when a nursing student comes in the nursing instructor is usually around "some where". our instructors were breathing down our backs. i had a nursing studet come in and say. "i'm only allowed to watch the vent today".. the nursing instuctor was no where to be found. ( this is typical by-the-way) i started going over the asessment with her, she said i'm not to do that today, i'm only doing the vent. so i pulled a chair up in front of the vent and i told her to come get me right away if the bellow stopped going up and down, or if a pretty red light comes on. or if the vent makes a wha, wha sound run like the wind. i later found the instuctor, and she said," yes that's her goal today. to observe the vent. " what! i went in and asked the student about the vent, o2 tissue diffusion gradient,vt, abg interp. etc.. she was lost. now can you imagine how stressed she is going to be as a new grad trying to figure out how to manage 8 pt.s and corralate lab, pt asessment etc. feel bad for her really. she is paying a tremendous amt of money for her education and is getting none.
    Last edit by lauralassie on Jan 8, '07
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"] the orientee was supposed to be almost ready to be on her own -- and she scared me to death! wanted to give my antihypertensives when my bp was 82/50, wanted to give my hctz when i was dehydrated from vomiting, npo, and my iv rate was only 50cc/hour and a few other things indicating (to me, anyway) poor judgment. when i refused to take the meds and outlined my rationale, she ordered me to take them anyway so she wouldn't get into trouble.

    another time, i heard a preceptor tell her orientee not to give my antihypertensives if my bp was less than 100/systolic. (it was.) newbie comes in to give my antihypertensives anyway. (different newbie.) i refuse. newbie goes to get preceptor. preceptor and i discuss my bp and agree not to give antihypertensives. later, i hear preceptor calmly explaining to newbie that giving an antihypertensive to a hypotensive patient can cause problems. (they're out in the hall, evidently close to my room, and i didn't hear anyone else around, so i'm assuming there was at least an illusion of privacy for this discussion.) newbie got defensive and started lying. preceptor remained calm and reiterated her position. newbie continued to be defensive, escalating the volume. later, i hear the two newbies commisserating about how mean their respective preceptors are.
    as a newbie who's done my share of complaining about preceptors, i definitely see your point here. while i've certainly made my share of mistakes, we were taught to always check the bp before giving anti-htn meds going back to first semester and, obviously, holding the meds if the bp is low.

    quite frankly, i don't know how anyone graduates from nursing school without knowing these basics. this is stuff they should have been learning the first day they started giving meds.

    if this is what preceptors are dealing with then, there's a major problem here not just with the newbies but, probably, the nursing program itself.

    it's one thing for a newbie to make mistakes from lack of experience. it's a whole different matter if they don't know the basics of what's taught in most nursing programs.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 8, '07
  9. by   oldiebutgoodie
    Quote from lauralassie
    But then, I really think new nurses are more stressed than we were (I too have been a nurse that long). The reason being, I think most nursing schools don't train a nurse for what their work will be.There is too much focus on book work and theory rather thanapplication of theory ,ie...working
    Bravo!! I thinkyou hit the nail on the head. When I came out of school 2 years ago with my BSN, I could hardly do anything. As I have mentioned in a previous thread, we did not learn phlebotomy, starting IVs, and most other procedures were done on a plastic dummy in lab. I didn't really start IVs, draw blood, or drop NG tubes till I was working, and it was pretty much amateur night. We complained in our program about lack of skills training and were shot down, stating that our first job would teach us that, and that we needed to learn CRITICAL THINKING.

    Well, that's all fine and good, but it's a little hard to think critically when you can't even do the basic skills.

    However, that being said, I still feel (based on having worked in 2 other professions) that there is far more gossip, backstabbing, tattling, and "young-eating" in nursing than I have ever experienced in my 30 years of working.

    Oldiebutgoodie
  10. by   buddiage
    "the floodgates opened, and she started complaining about what a terrible place it was to work, the lousy pay, the horrible hours and how all the experienced staff were mean to her. (the preceptor came back into the room in time to hear that.) totally unprofessional! the preceptor didn't say anything in front of me, and calmly took her off to "plan the rest of our day"

    i'm a student nurse, and i gaurantee you that nobody in my group at clinicals (there are 8) would never consider saying anything like that, and each of us would've gotten your vitals before giving meds like that.

    we also loved the people that were helping us, and gave them genuine thank-yous.

    sometimes, i have no clue where all these students are going to school at, because that experience is not like mine at all.

    i don't even get how a newbie wouldn't even know those things, and i'm only on my second semester of nursing school!
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    Ah Ruby - thanks for this thread.

    I usually chime in and say that "nurses" don't eat their young - it is simply people who do it and it happens in all walks of life . . . heck I've known stay-at-home moms who are very rude . . . .

    I'm always amazed at how one person will perceive a situation and take offense . . . . I mentioned on another thread about a new to our facility nurse (not a new nurse) walked out of report because she thought I didn't like her because I was not looking at her . . . keep in mind we sit at a counter that faces the wall and I'm looking at my notes and MAR. I told her she was imaging things and went on with report.

    steph
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    Bravo!! I thinkyou hit the nail on the head. When I came out of school 2 years ago with my BSN, I could hardly do anything. As I have mentioned in a previous thread, we did not learn phlebotomy, starting IVs, and most other procedures were done on a plastic dummy in lab. I didn't really start IVs, draw blood, or drop NG tubes till I was working, and it was pretty much amateur night. We complained in our program about lack of skills training and were shot down, stating that our first job would teach us that, and that we needed to learn CRITICAL THINKING.

    Well, that's all fine and good, but it's a little hard to think critically when you can't even do the basic skills.

    However, that being said, I still feel (based on having worked in 2 other professions) that there is far more gossip, backstabbing, tattling, and "young-eating" in nursing than I have ever experienced in my 30 years of working.

    Oldiebutgoodie
    I guess it depends on the school - I graduated 9 years ago and I did do IV's and phlebotomy, etc., although I will admit NO NG tubes and I still have only put in 3 and they scare me.

    However I will have to say in my experience in working in all kinds of different fields, there are gossipers and backstabbers and tattlers and "young-eating" folks everywhere.

    One of the worst was a computer company I worked for in the 1980's - not only all of the above but the affairs among staff who were married!~!

    steph
  13. by   squeakykitty
    Quote from ruby vee
    catchy title, eh? right up there with "why are nurses such backstabbers" (assuming that all nurses are backstabbers) and "nurses eat their young" and "why are nurses so mean?" i don't know about the rest of us "seasoned nurses", but i'm getting rather tired of all the threads busting on us for being "mean" to new nurses, students, etc. it seems to be an underlying assumption on most of the threads of the ilk that nurses are mean, evil backstabbers who live to humiliate someone with less experience.

    i've had the opportunity lately to observe some newbies and their preceptors from the patient's perspective. granted, i've been a nurse for 29 years and have been both an orientee and a preceptor -- most recently an orientee. so i do have some experience from pretty much all sides now.

    i was a patient, flat in bed after my spinal surgery. the orientee and preceptor introduced themselves, outlined the plan for the day, and then the preceptor left for a short while to sort out another patient who was screaming the screams of the totally demented, leaving the orientee to do my assessment and am care. the orientee was supposed to be almost ready to be on her own -- and she scared me to death! wanted to give my antihypertensives when my bp was 82/50, wanted to give my hctz when i was dehydrated from vomiting, npo, and my iv rate was only 50cc/hour and a few other things indicating (to me, anyway) poor judgment. when i refused to take the meds and outlined my rationale, she ordered me to take them anyway so she wouldn't get into trouble. i asked her how long she'd been in this job, and was it her first nursing job, or where had she worked before. the floodgates opened, and she started complaining about what a terrible place it was to work, the lousy pay, the horrible hours and how all the experienced staff were mean to her. (the preceptor came back into the room in time to hear that.) totally unprofessional! the preceptor didn't say anything in front of me, and calmly took her off to "plan the rest of our day."

    later that day, i overheard the orientee telling someone (i'm assuming on her cellphone) how totally mean her preceptor was, and how the preceptor was "out to get her." she said "all i was doing was bonding with my patient who is a nurse, too, and the ***** (preceptor) just totally humiliated me. she told me i was unprofessional! i thought you were supposed to be nice to your patients."
    sounds like she doesn't like to be corrected. if she does that, maybe she won't be a safe nurse because she can't learn from her mistakes.

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