When the hospital cancels you for a shift... - page 3

by NanikRN 12,400 Views | 44 Comments

Lately census has been low. We take turns with cancellations. My problem is with our hospital's unwritten but absolutely expected to comply policy. If a nurse works a 12 hr shift s/he is not cancelled but "delayed". Which... Read More


  1. 0
    sounds like a lot of math at payroll time...
  2. 0
    Quote from nanikrn
    lately census has been low. we take turns with cancellations. my problem is with our hospital's unwritten but absolutely expected to comply policy.

    if a nurse works a 12 hr shift s/he is not cancelled but "delayed". which means that you have to be available or on call for the hospital in case you are needed at 3p or ll pm if nights. so it's not really like being off cause you're waiting, can't schedule other places. (many of nurses work agencies also).

    is this typical?
    ​yes, i've found it to be typical.
  3. 0
    yes. we are only cancelled at 4 hours at a time. so you can't do anything the whole day/night. dreading the call.if you want to get paid you have to use vacation days. or you can choose to go unpaid. there is not any " on call pay".....
  4. 0
    My hospital recently changed policy. There is no longer on call pay but they only expect a nurse to be available for 4 hours. I think it's a nice trade-off. On my unit we make a list of people willing to go first if there is low workload. Usually that is sufficient but if not, they go by who hasn't had it the longest.
  5. 2
    I worked at a faciility that would do that with no reimbursement. You were put on "standby" for either 4 or 6 hours, at the end of that time if they called you and said you were free then you were free.
    I had a big issue with this policy as it was happening once or more a week for a while, it ultimately left me and several others in the position of quitting. I think it's unfair when you are unable to work elsewhere and you are held to a standard of being available for them with no income.
    So it IS legal, but it's NOT reasonable.
    Hoozdo and wooh like this.
  6. 2
    I worked one place that started putting me "on call." After the first instance of being paid only $4 an hour, and coming in to find that I forfeited my time and one half pay for the last four hours of a twelve hour shift, I wouldn't answer the phone. Then I found another job and quit. My time is too valuable to have it hijacked by some idiot in the staffing office.
    nurse2033 and JZ_RN like this.
  7. 1
    We've recently switched to that being policy. We used to be "on call" and had to be available all shift for them for the high price to them of $2/hr. They decided that was too much money for them to spend, so now we're on "stand by" and have to be available all shift for them for no money at all. It gives them absolutely NO INCENTIVE to plan responsibly. And apparently since they changed the name from "on call" to "stand by" they seem to think their staff is stupid enough to think this is completely different. But nurses are a dime a dozen these days, so we pretty much have to put up with whatever policy they come up with.

    According to employment laws, it's iffy as to legality, but who wants to be the one that pushes the issue and all of the sudden have a ton of written warnings in their file and get fired?
    Hoozdo likes this.
  8. 1
    How can this possibly be legal? If you're "on call" they must compensate you for it. (and forcing you to use your PTO doesn't count)
    JZ_RN likes this.
  9. 0
    If you are "on-call" you better be getting paid for all that time. Otherwise I'd say no way and either enjoy my shift off or go work a PRN shift elsewhere if I wanted.
  10. 0
    Quote from ggunther
    sounds like a lot of math at payroll time...
    My head started spinning after the first paragraph. If there were a pop quiz afterwards am sure would get a big fat "0". *LOL*


    http://www.me.utexas.edu/~bard/Bard_...ITOE-2005).pdf


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