When do they get a return on investment? - page 5

by hiddencatRN 7,217 Views | 59 Comments

I recently started a new job working part time. I'll skip the details, but basically, it's not going to work out for me to stay here. I feel bad to be planning on leaving so soon, and would feel a bit better if we can guesstimate... Read More


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    And if you leave a job in only a couple months, you just don't put it on your resume. Everyone knows that. Just say you took time off for a family issue or something.....
    TiddlDwink likes this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    And if you leave a job in only a couple months, you just don't put it on your resume. Everyone knows that. Just say you took time off for a family issue or something.....
    ...and if they find out you are lying (as is likely to happen in a smaller community or specialty facilitity), you will be automatically fired with no chance of rehire -- which could make it harder to get future jobs.
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    I have been reading this thread with my mouth open in disbelief but when I came upon this gem I nearly spit my beer all over my phone.

    All I can say is....What the ? what planet are you ???? huh?

    To the OP-ever seen Kill Bill? remember this line : you don't owe them $#!%

    It is a job, you do work to get money, so you can buy stuff. What could you possibly owe them? You are the one providing the service, which is why you are getting paid. If the scenery sucks, change it. It is your right.

    To others on this thread who seem to think orientation is free education- I beg to differ. I received my education from a University. I paid them for that. My employers provide orientation (and even as a new grad at the height of demand I never heard of a six month long orientation) in order to ensure I am competent to perform my duties to their specifications while meeting various regulatory requirements. They are not doing anything for me that they do not do for all employees in order to be in compliance with various and sundry regulations from the governmental and accrediting agencies that oversee the facility. Its not that big a deal.

    Finally, with all due respect, I do not have to divulge every job I have ever had to a potential employer unless I am 1) applying to work at a nuclear facility (which I did, and got the job, and KEPT the job) or 2) applying for a high security government position. The HR nimwits at most private facilities cannot scry on me nor do they have a crystal ball. I include the jobs on my resume which apply to the position I am seeking. I have different resumes on my computer depending on the potential employer. I do not include my job at the nuclear power plant because it is irrelevant to nursing, I do not include my first job at a company that no longer exists, and I do not include the jobs I was fired from. HOWEVER, when I worked at the nuclear power plant, enlisted in the military, and when I apply for corrections positions, you bet your sweet pie I list every job because they actually have the ability to look that stuff up.

    I have never heard of anyone being fired for omitting an irrelevant position from their resume. It is extremely common practice, even expected.

    Quote from llg
    ...and if they find out you are lying (as is likely to happen in a smaller community or specialty facilitity), you will be automatically fired with no chance of rehire -- which could make it harder to get future jobs.
    SE_BSN_RN and TiddlDwink like this.
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    Quote from llg

    ...and if they find out you are lying (as is likely to happen in a smaller community or specialty facilitity), you will be automatically fired with no chance of rehire -- which could make it harder to get future jobs.
    Not including a job on a resume isn't a lie. Resumes aren't supposed to be comprehensive job histories but targeted marketing documents specialized to the position you're applying for.
    SE_BSN_RN, gypsyd8, and TiddlDwink like this.
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    I just recently quit a job after 2 months, it was not a good fit for me. This is what orientation entails, your employer puts you on 90 day probation and if they think you're a good fit they will lift the probation and you become an entitled member of the staff but if you fail the expectations then you are let go. it should be 2 way, if you don't think they fulfill your professional or personal needs then you fire them. You don't owe them anything, Of course there has to be a plan b to fall on like lining up a new job before you quit.
    SE_BSN_RN, BrandonLPN, and gypsyd8 like this.
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    I retire in 23 days.

    Once in my career I had a job that I knew from day 11 of orientation (my first day actually on the unit) was not a "fit" for me. So I went to the charge nurse and told her. I also asked if she wanted a 2-week notice, which I was willing to work. She said that there was no reason for that, and to just go to HR and tell them. I did.

    I do not include that job on my resume, because I was never a real "full time" employee at that hospital. I was an orientee.

    Now, that has been almost 20 years ago. It has never come up or been mentioned.
    SE_BSN_RN, DizzyLizzyNurse, and gypsyd8 like this.
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    Quote from TiddlDwink
    I retire in 23 days.

    Once in my career I had a job that I knew from day 11 of orientation (my first day actually on the unit) was not a "fit" for me. So I went to the charge nurse and told her. I also asked if she wanted a 2-week notice, which I was willing to work. She said that there was no reason for that, and to just go to HR and tell them. I did.

    I do not include that job on my resume, because I was never a real "full time" employee at that hospital. I was an orientee.

    Now, that has been almost 20 years ago. It has never come up or been mentioned.
    TiddLDwink, but when you started there was no such thing as signing a contract. Here in South Florida, they want you to sign on the dotted line and if you do not fulfill it they make you pay for orientation. The dilemma that the O/P is facing.

    After reading this post, I asked my friends who have graduated since 2008 and all of them had to sign a 2 year contract (I thought it was 1 year so imagine my surprise ), and the one that actually got hired in 2008 (some did not until the years following), got a bonus as high as $7K (half after 90 days, the other half at then end), she still had to sign on the dotted line though. Bonuses it apppears do not exist down here anymore.

    A classmate of a friend who graduated in April 2012, got hired at a hospital in Oklahoma and they gave him a bonus plus moving expenses, and he is a new grad....sheesh, is it not freezing up there...LOL. I mean I like cold, but freezing my bouteee not so sure

    This post has made me ponder about my prospects now even more.

    CONGRATULATIONS on retiring though. Celebrate and have a margarita on moi
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
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    Quote from SENSUALBLISSINFL
    TiddLDwink, but when you started there was no such thing as signing a contract. Here in South Florida, they want you to sign on the dotted line and if you do not fulfill it they make you pay for orientation. The dilemma that the O/P is facing.
    No, it's not. My dilemma is that I feel bad about leaving the job so soon after starting it and was interested to know how long an employer feels they need a new hire to stick around for it to have been "worth it."
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    Quote from hiddencatRN
    No, it's not. My dilemma is that I feel bad about leaving the job so soon after starting it and was interested to know how long an employer feels they need a new hire to stick around for it to have been "worth it."
    Ooops, sorry for the misunderstanding.
    General concensus seems to be, you owe them nothing...I stand by that, but do the responsible thing, advise the nurse manager is not a good fit for you, hey, you may even be transferred to a unit that may be best suitable for, who knows. If not, be professional (you appear to be by your querry), give your two weeks notice and say ciao.....I have always felt this way >> leave the front door with your right foot out and head up, the world is small, you never know when it detours you back to square one

    Good Luck.
    SE_BSN_RN likes this.
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    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Not including a job on a resume isn't a lie. Resumes aren't supposed to be comprehensive job histories but targeted marketing documents specialized to the position you're applying for.
    But job applications often ask you to list all of your employment for the last X number of years. An omission there would be a lie -- and cause for immediate termination at any hospital I have ever worked at. (And I have worked at several in different parts of the country -- and I have personally known people to be fired for leaving out pertinent details on their applications.)

    Just because it hasn't happened to you personally, doesn't mean it doesn't happen.
    Altra likes this.


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